Outlook.com Review


Recommended Posts

]SK[

This review is from nearly two years ago...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
Jack W

Outlook.com is a great service - the only issue I've ever had, is sometimes it will say "Something went wrong on our end", which can be annoying when sending emails.

Link to post
Share on other sites
TPreston

lol @ people complaining it didn't support imap which hasn't been updated since the 90s, avoid it like the plague.

The biggest advantage of outlook is Exchange.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+InsaneNutter

lol @ people complaining it didn't support imap which hasn't been updated since the 90s, avoid it like the plague.

The biggest advantage of outlook is Exchange.

 

Sadly unless anything has changed IMAP is still the only way to access Outlook.com using desktop email clients on OSX and Linux.

You only get Exchange ActiveSync with Outlook.com, not the full Exchange experience.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 years later...
PGHammer
On 19/09/2015 at 05:45, InsaneNutter said:

 

Sadly unless anything has changed IMAP is still the only way to access Outlook.com using desktop email clients on OSX and Linux.

You only get Exchange ActiveSync with Outlook.com, not the full Exchange experience.

Actually, Outlook.com has supported POP3 from the beginning - as has Outlook the desktop e-mail client - the latter gained IMAP4 with Outlook 98.  You are likely thinking of educational e-mail accounts - and Google's GMail and GoogleMail services that use IMAP4 as their defaults.  In other words, it's not an Outlook.com flaw, it's an e-mail client flaw (in Linux, for example, I use KMail - which supports POP3 just fine).

 

The complaint that was true with the first two versions of the Outlook desktop e-mail client was the lack of IMAP4 support - because of educational e-mail services, which were - and still are - based on IMAP4 - not POP3 - which was something that Outlook 98 fixed.  (Outlook 98 for Windows was an out-of-order release, in that there was no Office 98 for Windows; there was, however, an Office 98 for OS X; also, Outlook 98 was the first version of the Outlook e-mail client to be given away to all and sundry; you had to be under a rock to NOT get Outlook 98 for Windows on a CD that year - it was as bad as AOL CDs.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

OMG, @PGHammer, this thread is 7 years old, with the last post 5 years ago.

 

Cut it out.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By indospot
      Outlook on the web is getting text predictions
      by João Carrasqueira



      Microsoft's Outlook e-mail service is getting a couple of major features this month, according to the company's feature roadmap for Microsoft 365 (via Windows Latest). The first of those features is text predictions, which is pretty much what it sounds like. Outlook will be able to guess the rest of a word or sentence based on what you're typing, and users can press the Tab key to automatically enter the predicted text. A separate support document details how the feature can be used.

      If that sounds familiar, that's because it's the same feature that Google rolled out to Gmail two years ago under the name Smart Compose. Gmail's feature equivalent has actually gone past the web version of the service, and made its way to mobile devices a few months later.

      The other important addition is a "Send later" feature, which lets users schedule when they want a specific message to be sent. This can be useful if you don't want people to know you're sending e-mails in the middle of the night, for example. This capability has also been a part of Google's e-mail service for some time, so it's good that Microsoft is matching it.

      Looking at the roadmap, there are a few other features coming to Outlook this month. Suggested replies are expanding to more European countries with support for French and Italian, and the Microsoft To Do integration is getting some improvements with support for rich text formatting. Outlook for Windows is also getting a notable new feature - the ability to save app settings to the cloud so they sync across devices.

    • By indospot
      November updates to Microsoft 365 include dark mode for OneNote 2016 and more
      by João Carrasqueira



      We're nearing the end of the month, and that means it's time for Microsoft to once again highlight the changes made to its Microsoft 365 products over the past few weeks. There actually wasn't a blog post for October, so this is the first time we're getting a feature roundup of this kind in a couple of months.

      Many of the changes in this month's updates were actually announced at Ignite earlier in the month. For example, OneNote 2016 has been brought back to life, and it's now getting a new dark mode that's already available for all Office 365 subscribers. Another previously announced feature is Sheet View in Excel, which lets users filter and sort lists in spreadsheets without affecting other users in real-time co-authoring.

      One thing that's new is that users who create quizzes using Microsoft Forms can now allow respondents to upload files. Microsoft is also announcing an upcoming Outlook.com integration with Sticky Notes, which will let users see their notes in their inbox. This will be rolling out to everyone next month.



      For IT managers, there are other updates this month, but they were also announced back at Ignite. These include a new Endpoint Manager, which brings together features from Intune and System Center Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr). Microsoft has also made Intune licensing available to ConfigMgr customers. There's a new Productivity Score feature that lets organizations get insights into how productive its teams are and what factors might be affecting productivity.

      Finally, Microsoft is announcing that Cloud App Security and Azure Advanced Threat Protection are now available for U.S. Government GCC High customers, bringing additional security capabilities to the public sector.

    • By indospot
      Microsoft is testing Gmail integration in Outlook on the web
      by João Carrasqueira



      Microsoft seems to be testing a new integration in Outlook.com which will bring Google services into the experience. The capability was first spotted by Twitter user Florian B, who pointed out that not only is it possible to add a Gmail e-mail inbox, but you can also attach files from Google Drive into e-mail messages, as well as access your Google Calendar on Outlook.com.

      As it stands, the feature seems to be very limited in terms of availability, and it doesn't seem to be available for us just yet. This might be because it's still in early testing, as Florian points out that switching between Outlook and Gmail accounts refreshes the entire page, and you also can't add more than one Google account (via The Verge).

      Otherwise, the integration seems to be much like what you find in the Outlook apps, which already let you manage accounts from a multitude of services. The Mail and Calendar apps on Windows 10 can also integrate e-mail and calendar from Google, but you can't attach Google Drive files as easily, so this could be an improvement for desktop users.

      It's currently unknown when the feature will be more widely available, but we've reached out to Microsoft for more information, and we'll update this article if there's anything new.

    • By indospot
      Outlook on the web can now show your calendar and tasks next to your inbox
      by João Carrasqueira

      The web version of Microsoft's Outlook service has been updated recently to add a new capability, which lets users view their calendar or tasks from the To Do service next to their e-mail inbox. Until now, the Outlook inbox had links to both calendar and To Do services, but they would open in a different page, taking users away from the inbox.

      As seen in the image above, the integration can be accessed through the calendar icon on the top menu bar, next to the Skype button. In this split view, the calendar can only be seen in a weekly or daily view, but you can still view and create new events.

      The Tasks view also has limited functionality, but it can work in a pinch, You can also drag e-mails from the inbox into the task list to create a new task, which will include a link to the message itself so you can see it later.

      In addition to this change, Microsoft recently added the ability to use different themes while in dark mode, and there have been minor tweaks to the look of the page, such as a redesigned "New Message" button.

    • By Sszecret
      Dark mode themes show up for Outlook.com, seemingly on a staggered rollout [Update]
      by Florin Bodnarescu



      Back in August of 2017, Microsoft announced that its Outlook.com email service would get a fresh coat of paint, as it kicked off the beta for the new UI. The beta concluded last year, and a couple of months ago, Microsoft stated that the new experience was ready to roll out to everyone. However, Dark mode, one of the more interesting components of this release, was still incomplete.

      For the entirety of its existence, Outlook.com's nighttime-friendly mode sported a disclaimer that some themes were simply unavailable to use if you chose the dark gray variant over the default light one. The "some" really meant that all options but the default shade of blue were unavailable to use, a decidedly Henry Ford approach to customization.

      This seems to have been rectified, as Dark mode now allows you to choose from the same selection of themes as Light mode - including the recently released rainbow-inspired ones. The caveat however is that this experience doesn't seem to be available to everyone, and it's unclear currently how Microsoft plans to approach this rollout. We have reached out to the company for further clarification.

      Do you like Outlook.com's Dark mode? What's your take on the colour options? Sound off in the comments below.

      Update: The rollout of Dark mode themes will be in accordance to the timeline outlined in this support article.