Elementary OS Luna released today


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sanctified

I believe you should be able to return to the precise packages with: sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-lts-precise.

 

I think the raring backports were just added to the repos very recently, maybe not all the 32 bit versions of those packages have not been uploaded yet (I remember this exact same problem happened when the quantal backports were first added to the repos, it caused 32 bit apps like steam to not be able to install). I think ubuntu 12.04.3 (which will use these packages by default on the iso) it due for release tomorrow, so maybe the issues will be sorted out by then. If not I'd report a bug on launchpad, because it sounds like there is some deps missing in the precise repos. Either that or those apps have hardcoded deps for certain versions of xorg for some reason, which would be pretty silly.

 

You could try the quantal packages instead: sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-lts-quantal

 

Its also possible to use just the backported kernel, I think its called linux-image-lts-raring or something like that.

 

I managed to fix it but it was a little more complicated. Reinstalled xorg core, that left me with a xserver without drivers, then via CLI reinstalled the precise xorg, then reboot again, then finally reinstalled wine and kingsoft.

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Azies

f*ck, I decided to install it thinking I could install Wine and kingsoft later and now I cant install Wine! :/

 

Wine is available in the App Center, got it installed and running here that way.

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AJerman

Anyone get this working with VNC yet?

 

x11vnc works fine!

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Freelancer1111

Found a cool icon on Deviantart for eOS Luna some time ago, just FYI :)
 
gLDS02q.png

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iron2000

Does the boot logo stay if you use the Nvidia drivers?

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AStalUK

Just loaded Elementary in to a new VM.  Quite like it, seems fairly sleek.

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AStalUK

Here is a site to help you setup your new OS:

 

http://www.elementaryupdate.com/

Nice site. Wingpanel Slim looks good, already have my browsers installed. I need to install LibreOffice is it better to go via the manager or get 4.1 directly from the LibreOffice site?

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x-scratch

does ubuntu tweak work with this?

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Growled

does ubuntu tweak work with this?

I doubt it. They have an elementary tweak, however, that does much the same thing.

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McKay

 

Here is a video I recorded tonight

 

 

 

Wow man that's your Youtube? Wow I stumbled upon your "Retro Gaming Room" video room years ago, had no idea its you  :D

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BobbyJobs

Seams bad I don't like that they put $10 automatically into the donation box. 
 

As for is being better than mint i would not say so, mint has been tested extensively and the team that make it know a thing or to they are not new to the game. And as for GUI its not that good its something that you can achive on any Linux with a few basic commands. 

Kali Linux FTW! :P

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Aergan

Installed it in a VM (Painful), installed it on baremetal (Worse). After getting it to recognise either VMware Video or Radeon X1700, it ran like a dumbed down version of Ubuntu but with an OSX theme pre-set which does nothing for me.

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+warwagon

Wow man that's your Youtube? Wow I stumbled upon your "Retro Gaming Room" video room years ago, had no idea its you  :D

 

Ah so you were 1 of the 219 people :D

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martin88

Wow, it's sleek and beautiful. I also like the default wallpapers. I guess I'll go the Linux route once support for XP and Vista ends.

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+Zlip792
  • The web browser is dreadful, it'll occasionally become unresponsive for no reasons that I can discern.

 

Its default browser is Midori based on WebkitGTK+.

File bugs here if you want them to fix: https://launchpad.net/midori

 

I don't know about Elementary OS variant because I tried it on Windows, and it does not have DFG JIT JS engine (codenamed) enabled, and it still uses Webkit API not new Apple Webkit2 API.

Because of no JIT, if you open few JS heavy sites, it will start to wobble down and become unresponsive and it also consume way higher memory than any other browser.

Just wanted to share few bits otherwise I didn't try that OS at all. I am till Windows guy not sure about future.

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Growled

Wow, it's sleek and beautiful. I also like the default wallpapers. I guess I'll go the Linux route once support for XP and Vista ends.

Yes, it is beautiful but it's also built on old technology. That is one reason it doesn't appeal to me. Ubuntu 12.04 is almost 1 and 1/2 years old now.

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Karl L.

Yes, it is beautiful but it's also built on old technology. That is one reason it doesn't appeal to me. Ubuntu 12.04 is almost 1 and 1/2 years old now.

 

Ubuntu 12.04 might not be the newest technology, but if it does everything you need what difference does that make? Is there some feature you need in Linux 3.10 that is not available in Linux 3.2? Or does MESA 8.0 hamper your experience in some way that MESA 9.1 would not? The Elementary OS team picked the latest Ubuntu LTS release as their base because it is a stable platform upon which they can build the technology they care about. I think sometimes we, as technology enthusiasts, are too concerned about having the latest version because it is the latest version, not because it solves a practical problem we are having. I'm not advocating using ancient technology by any means, but it hardly seems fair to classify an OS that is less than 2 years old and still receiving full security, stability, and bugfix updates as ancient. By your standard virtually every version of Windows is ancient before its successor is released!

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Growled

. By your standard virtually every version of Windows is ancient before its successor is released!

I don't think it's fair to compare the Windows and Linux ecosystems. They are completely different.

 

Is there some feature you need in Linux 3.10 that is not available in Linux 3.2?   

 

My laptop won't boot with 3.2. Plus, it lacks a lot of drivers the more up-to-date kernels have.

 

The Elementary OS team picked the latest Ubuntu LTS release as their base because it is a stable platform upon which they can build the technology they care about. I think sometimes we, as technology enthusiasts, are too concerned about having the latest version because it is the latest version, not because it solves a practical problem we are having. I'm not advocating using ancient technology by any means, but it hardly seems fair to classify an OS that is less than 2 years old and still receiving full security, stability, and bugfix updates as ancient.

 

I think the LTS has it's place. I wouldn't run anything else in a commercial environment, or on any production machine for that matter. As a hobbyist at home I don't want to run old software. I am trying out Manjaro Linux, because I like being up to date. It's just a personal preference.

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Karl L.

I don't think it's fair to compare the Windows and Linux ecosystems. They are completely different.

That is fair. I was trying to make a point about support and lifetime, but they have different enough development cycles that I concede your point. Since both GNU/Linux and FreeBSD are developed as open-source projects, does FreeBSD make a better point of comparison? Each major FreeBSD release (i.e. 8, 9, 10) would be considered ancient before its successor was released if we judged it purely by the age of the base system after two years. The major difference between GNU/Linux and other major operating systems, including FreeBSD, in this regard is that GNU/Linux effectively has many, sometimes divergent, upstreams whereas everyone else has a single, authoritative point of origin. Still, I don't think its fair to measure longterm releases of major Linux distributions by a different meter altogether.

 

My laptop won't boot with 3.2. Plus, it lacks a lot of drivers the more up-to-date kernels have.

Your point about hardware support is well taken. That is a very reasonable and understandable reason to require a newer kernel, especially if the lack of hardware support in an older version of Linux prevents your system from booting altogether. Although drivers are updated on a regular basis, unless newer features or bugfixes are required for your hardware to work properly - which certainly seems to be true in your case - I would still put "more up-to-date" drivers in the nonessential category.

 

I think the LTS has it's place. I wouldn't run anything else in a commercial environment, or on any production machine for that matter. As a hobbyist at home I don't want to run old software. I am trying out Manjaro Linux, because I like being up to date. It's just a personal preference.

That is another very good point. If you like to live on the bleeding edge, that is okay. However, although your preference essentially precludes you from using Elementary OS, it does not discount Elementary OS as a solid Linux distribution in any way. I get the sense that we agree in principal, I just took your original "built on old technology" comment as much more accusatory than you intended it to be.

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ACTIONpack

Don't like it. Feel incomplete like most Linux OS.

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Mindovermaster

Don't like it. Feel incomplete like most Linux OS.

 

Care to tell us what isn't?

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medhunter

can I get some eye candy features from this version and inject into Vanilla Ubuntu LTS?

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Karl L.

can I get some eye candy features from this version and inject into Vanilla Ubuntu LTS?

 

You can add the Elementary OS PPA to Ubuntu and pick-and-choose whichever packages from it you want.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:elementary-os/stable
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