Ford Explorer Stuttering - Too Much Gas?


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So there's a backstory as to how this is all my fault, but it's kind of embarrasing so here's the end result.  I have a 2006 Ford Explorer XLT.  As the result of something I was experimenting with there was some severe damage to the air intake system (An explosion that destroyed most of the plastic parts).  I've replaced just about everything under the hood, but I still have an issue with the vehicle, and here are my symptoms.

 

- If the engine is cold, it starts right up with no problems.  However, if it's hot outside, or if I've been driving recently and I try to start the engine, it tries to die unless I slap the gas.  It will stutter for 5-10 seconds and eventually even out.  After it evens out it runs great.

- When I fill up the gas, it doesn't want to start, it's the same as when the engine is warm, but much worse.  When I fill up, I have to hold the starter and hold the gas down.  Then, once it starts, I hold the RPMs at around 2,000 for about 10 seconds, and when I let off it will run just fine.  If I let off the gas too early once it starts, it will just die.

- If I drive for a really long period of time without stopping, it doesn't want to shut off.  For example last September I ended my contract with the Army and drove back to Kentucky from Washington.  I would put in about 700 miles a day, and would fill up every 350 miles or so.  I didn't usually stop between fill-ups, I would just stop at a truck stop or something where I could also eat and everything.  When I would stop after driving for 300+ miles without stopping, when I would turn off the engine and remove the key, the engine would continue to sputter and crank for 3 or 4 seconds, as if it had an excess of fuel that was being burned off.

- Gas mileage does not seem to be affected, at least not very noticeably anyway.  I was getting about 20 mpg on the highway before the damage, and am getting about the same now, depending on terrain.

 

I really don't want to spend thousands of dollars replacing every little piece it could possibly be in hopes of finding the right one early, so any advice or suggestions you could offer to help me eliminate this problem would be greatly appreciated.

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when you turn the vehicle off, the ecu shuts off,so the fuel injectors shut off, there cant be extra fuel being pumped,normally, therefore i suspect its an electrical issue where electrical current is still flowing for some time,either to the ignition switch,or the fuel injectors. looks to me like either a grounding issue, or the alternator is bad.

 

as for the vehicle not turning on properly when warm, could be multiple things. usually,you need spark, compression and fuel pressure for the engine to turn on.get the compression test done,and check your plugs. if all is well, then it could be the coolant temp sensor.

 

get your vehicle scanned for codes,this gives you so much information. i think alot of car shops and part shops will scan it for free. call them up and ask. i always read about autozone doing these scans for free. i just saw this on their website

 


Don't buy a part you don't need. AutoZone will test your car's parts for free. We can test your car's battery, alternator*, starter* and voltage regulator* while they're still on your car. We can also give your car a complete starting and charging systems test. You can also take your alternator, starter or battery into our store and we'll test it. In most stores, we can also test voltage regulators, control modules, coils, throttle position sensors (TPSs) and other engine management components.

 

dont know if its available in your area.

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Find the idle air control valve, and either replace it or clean it. Since it runs fine when you give it gas, its bypassing the IAC and going straight into the intake. My wife's car did the exact same thing.

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So there's a backstory as to how this is all my fault, but it's kind of embarrasing so here's the end result.  I have a 2006 Ford Explorer XLT.  As the result of something I was experimenting with there was some severe damage to the air intake system (An explosion that destroyed most of the plastic parts).  I've replaced just about everything under the hood, but I still have an issue with the vehicle, and here are my symptoms.

 

- If the engine is cold, it starts right up with no problems.  However, if it's hot outside, or if I've been driving recently and I try to start the engine, it tries to die unless I slap the gas.  It will stutter for 5-10 seconds and eventually even out.  After it evens out it runs great.

- When I fill up the gas, it doesn't want to start, it's the same as when the engine is warm, but much worse.  When I fill up, I have to hold the starter and hold the gas down.  Then, once it starts, I hold the RPMs at around 2,000 for about 10 seconds, and when I let off it will run just fine.  If I let off the gas too early once it starts, it will just die.

- If I drive for a really long period of time without stopping, it doesn't want to shut off.  For example last September I ended my contract with the Army and drove back to Kentucky from Washington.  I would put in about 700 miles a day, and would fill up every 350 miles or so.  I didn't usually stop between fill-ups, I would just stop at a truck stop or something where I could also eat and everything.  When I would stop after driving for 300+ miles without stopping, when I would turn off the engine and remove the key, the engine would continue to sputter and crank for 3 or 4 seconds, as if it had an excess of fuel that was being burned off.

- Gas mileage does not seem to be affected, at least not very noticeably anyway.  I was getting about 20 mpg on the highway before the damage, and am getting about the same now, depending on terrain.

 

I really don't want to spend thousands of dollars replacing every little piece it could possibly be in hopes of finding the right one early, so any advice or suggestions you could offer to help me eliminate this problem would be greatly appreciated.

A few things I'd try, would be a higher octante rating of fuel, Get your CEL codes checked. It could be a bad IAC or Idle Air Control Valve, If it has a Mass Air flow sensor, That's probably what I'd check first.  Afterwards I'd do a tune up (spark plugs)  and do a sea-foam intake fogging.

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To the AutoZone thing been with the company seven years, all we test is starting, charging, and battery. Asking as you don't live in California you can have them scan your vehicle for free and get a printout of power train codes. Also of I had to guess I'd try a fuel pressure regulator.

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