Plants Vs Zombies 2 Finally Coming To The App Store Tomorrow


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Crisp

Plants Vs Zombies 2 Finally Coming To The App Store Tomorrow

 

pvz2-640x640.jpg

It?s about time. Seriously.

 

In a clever Facebook status update, the App Store posted a picture of a zombie hand, thrusting upward through the dirt. The caption reads, ?It?s about time. Guess what game is coming tomorrow??

 

That game can only be PopCap?s Plants vs Zombies 2, the highly anticipated sequel to smash hit Plants vs Zombies, a lane-based castle defense game that?s since appeared on every gaming platform known. PVZ2 was supposed to release last month in July, but was delayed here in the US.

 

Tomorrow, then, is the big day, and we?re excited.

 

 

Plants vs Zombies 2 takes the basic concept of the bizarre variety of combat-enabled plants defending a home base against hordes of wacky zombies. The new game adds several layers of depth to the gameplay, including variously themed eras of history, like Ancient Egypt, Pirates, and the Wild West.

 

PopCap?s new Plants vs Zombies 2 will be free to play, exclusively on the App Store, for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Brains!

 

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Growled

It sure has been a long time coming. 

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Elliot B.

As usual, they've skipped out on Android for the time being.

 

Carmageddon came out 7 months after the iOS release, and Batman: Arkham City Lockdown came out 1.5 years after the iOS release.

I miss iOS gaming :(

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GotBored

As usual, they've skipped out on Android for the time being.

 

Carmageddon came out 7 months after the iOS release, and Batman: Arkham City Lockdown came out 1.5 years after the iOS release.

I miss iOS gaming :(

 

Don't stress too much PvZ 2 isn't really any good, the original is much much better.

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Elliot B.

Don't stress too much PvZ 2 isn't really any good, the original is much much better.

It wasn't really my point.

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GotBored

It wasn't really my point.

 

I know, your point was that everything is released to the Android ecosystem much later than the IOS one. I was just being nice.

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PurpleHaze420

So. this question coming from somebody who's never played the original...

 

Can somebody explain to me why PvZ 2 is free and PvZ is still a paid for app.? Have they added micro payments into the 2nd one or something to offset the price cost.?

 

I downloaded it yesterday purely because it was free, seems ok I suppose. Shrug.

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Elliot B.

So. this question coming from somebody who's never played the original...

 

Can somebody explain to me why PvZ 2 is free and PvZ is still a paid for app.? Have they added micro payments into the 2nd one or something to offset the price cost.?

 

I downloaded it yesterday purely because it was free, seems ok I suppose. Shrug.

They do indeed use a microtransaction payment system.

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The Teej

I honestly don't get why its exclusive to iOS, it's not like they're making money from keeping it exclusive?

 

I'd gladly play this on Android but I guess they don't want my money. Oh well.

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Elliot B.

I honestly don't get why its exclusive to iOS, it's not like they're making money from keeping it exclusive?

 

I'd gladly play this on Android but I guess they don't want my money. Oh well.

Because there isn't as much money involved in Android gaming, so they developed it for iOS first.

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ZakO

I honestly don't get why its exclusive to iOS, it's not like they're making money from keeping it exclusive?

 

I'd gladly play this on Android but I guess they don't want my money. Oh well.

It's not exclusive to iOS, they've already said they're working on other platforms. iOS brings in significantly more money than Android though, and it's easier to develop for (i.e. you don't have to test a million different devices with different screen sizes, resolutions, hardware configurations, operating system versions, etc.) so it makes sense to release it first.
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Elliot B.

It's not exclusive to iOS, they've already said they're working on other platforms. iOS brings in significantly more money than Android though, and it's easier to develop for (i.e. you don't have to test a million different devices with different screen sizes, resolutions, hardware configurations, operating system versions, etc.) so it makes sense to release it first.

Perfect answer :)
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The Teej

It's not exclusive to iOS, they've already said they're working on other platforms. iOS brings in significantly more money than Android though, and it's easier to develop for (i.e. you don't have to test a million different devices with different screen sizes, resolutions, hardware configurations, operating system versions, etc.) so it makes sense to release it first.

 

PopCap?s new Plants vs Zombies 2 will be free to play, exclusively on the App Store, for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Brains!

 

 

I'm just going by what the article says to be honest

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ZakO

I'm just going by what the article says to be honest

 

 

Yeah, the article is misleading (well, it is CultOfMac so they usually pretend other platforms don't exist), the original Popcap blog post gives additional details:

 

Plants vs. Zombies 2 is free-to-play and initially available exclusively on the App Store for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, with more platforms to be added later this year and beyond. That?s the official line. To say it in plainer English: If you have an i-device, you know what to do and you?re welcome. If you don?t, don?t worry. We promise we haven?t forgotten you. We?d rather eat our own brains than not have you play the game too.

http://blog.popcap.com/2013/08/15/plants-vs-zombies-2-available-now/
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Andrew

I've downloaded it but yet to try it. From what I've heard though it's been spoiled with iAP.

 

Looking forward to Garden Warfare a lot more tbh.

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