Recommended Posts

Hum

Like many mothers, Rajeshwari Karnan was delighted when she gave birth to a son. The 23-year-old farm labourer and her husband, Karnan Perumal, 26, already had a two-year-old daughter, but like many in the state of Tamil Nadu, they considered a boy a particular blessing.

So when Rahul arrived in May, they were especially delighted.

However, just over a week later, their joy turned to misery.

One afternoon, says Rajeshwari, she was washing her daughter when she suddenly heard Rahul screaming from inside the hut. She ran towards him, but before she could get there, a neighbour shouted to her the words she will never forget: ?Your baby is on fire!?

?There was a flame on his belly and his right knee,? Rajeshwari told the New York Times last week, ?and my husband rushed with a towel to put it off [sic]. I got very scared.?

The couple immediately took their son to hospital, but the doctors were mystified.

Later, the parents returned home, hoping this bizarre and disturbing occurrence would not repeat itself.

But it has done so ? three more times, according to the couple. The last incident took place one afternoon last month, with their little boy suffering first and second-degree burns. As a result, the family have now been forced to move from their village, due to their neighbours? fears that the baby could cause a serious fire.

This month, the couple took the child to be examined at a hospital in the city of Chennai, where the doctors are equally baffled.

Foul play appears to have been ruled out, with Karnan Perumal saying that he and his wife would never be ?crazy [enough] to burn our own baby?.

Some people are saying the flames must be the work of a deity, while others suspect the use of combustible phosphorous in the  materials used to build the couple?s home.

But the doctors are now considering whether baby Rahul is a victim of one of the strangest and most mysterious of phenomena said to affect the body ? spontaneous human combustion.

?We are in a dilemma and haven?t come to any conclusion,? says Dr Narayan Babu. ?The parents have held that the baby burned instantaneously without any provocation. We are carrying out numerous tests. We are not saying it is SHC (spontaneous human  combustion) until all the investigations  are complete.?

Is it really possible for a baby to burst suddenly into flames? And if so, how on earth does it happen ? and could other infants elsewhere in the world fall victim to the same extraordinary circumstances?

Although spontaneous combustion has been written about for centuries, there are many who are sceptical about its existence. All too often, when presented with the grisly image of a pile of human ash with only the legs remaining, the doubters will insist that the victim probably died from falling asleep with a cigarette, or was sitting too near a fire.

Such explanations may seem reasonable, but they ignore the fact that human bodies are extremely hard to burn. We are composed largely of water. And the bits of us that aren?t damp ? especially our bones ? require a huge and  sustained amount of heat to reduce to ash.

Crematoriums use at least 30 cubic metres of gas, along with 600 cubic metres of pre-heated air, to incinerate a corpse. If it only required a small log fire or a cigarette to burn a body, then such places would be put out of business.

In fact, it is more absurd to  suggest these mysterious fires are caused by an external heat source rather than some as-yet- unexplained bodily function.

Human combustion has been gaining acceptance. In 2010, a coroner in Galway in Ireland recorded it as the cause of death in the case of 76-year-old Michael Faherty, whose charred corpse had been found lying on the floor of his living-room.

So, if we acknowledge that the phenomenon does exist ? how does it happen?

 

 British research biologist Brian J. Ford has shed new light on the mystery. In two recent articles, one of which appeared in the New Scientist, Professor Ford explains that spontaneous human combustion may be caused by a chemical called acetone that is produced naturally in the body.

Many women will recognise the smell of acetone, because it is often used as a solvent in nail-varnish removers. In healthy humans, acetone is normally disposed of through urine, but when people suffer from certain illnesses, acetone levels can build up in the body, and can even be smelled on the breath ? which is another way in which the chemical leaves us.

Indeed, the subject has been discussed on the popular website Mumsnet, where one poster wrote that her young daughter had ?acetone breath?, and that ?apparently children have higher than normal acetone levels?.

Professor Ford has noted that many of the people who have combusted spontaneously were unwell at the time, and as a result, may have developed a condition called ketosis, in which acetone in the body increases.

Ketosis can have a range of causes, including alcoholism, diabetes, a high-fat diet, and even, in babies, teething.

Furthermore, acetone infuses itself well into human fat. And ? this is crucial ? it is also  extremely flammable.

 

His theory certainly looks convincing ? though last week the doctors in India released the test results on poor little Rahul. They showed that the levels of acetone in his blood were not high. :iiam:


full story & video

post-37120-0-39917500-1377785770.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

But the doctors are now considering whether baby Rahul is a victim of one of the strangest and most mysterious of phenomena said to affect the body ? spontaneous human combustion.

 

I've heard of it but was never sure I believed in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
freak180

Flame on!!! Its a hidden gift the parents dont know about...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Lingwo

I don't know if the Mythbusters could air that episode.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

I can't wait until the kooky science-skeptics come out and claim the baby was smoking in bed after a night of drinking. :laugh: :rofl:

Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeChipshop

At title i was ... lolssssssss

At story i was like... Ohhhhh

At picture i wa slike... "poor little sh**"

 

There's not been a modern day report of spontaneous human combustion and you know why? Because it's to hard to fake in modern times. Far more than it was back when it was 'fashionable'.

"acetone infuses itself well into human fat. And ? this is crucial ? it is also extremely flammable" This has already been proven false and even if it was true, it's also been proven that the amount of Oxygen in tissues and fat isn't enough to allow for combustion.

This is a pure accident.

 

I don't know if the Mythbusters could air that episode.

 

:rofl:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bryan R.

At title i was ... lolssssssss

At story i was like... Ohhhhh

At picture i wa slike... "poor little sh**"

 

There's not been a modern day report of spontaneous human combustion and you know why? Because it's to hard to fake in modern times. Far more than it was back when it was 'fashionable'.

"acetone infuses itself well into human fat. And ? this is crucial ? it is also extremely flammable" This has already been proven false and even if it was true, it's also been proven that the amount of Oxygen in tissues and fat isn't enough to allow for combustion.

This is a pure accident.

 

 

:rofl:

I'm not convinced it's completely natural either but there have been reports in recent years. I've read them here on Neowin most likely from Hum.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
_dandy_

> Is it really possible for a baby to burst suddenly into flames? And if so, how on earth does it happen ? and could other infants elsewhere in the world fall victim to the same extraordinary circumstances?

 

Won't somebody PLEASE think of the children?

 

No, seriously, I'm not aware that age has ever been singled out in any spontaneous human combustion case discussion.  "Could other infants [...]" reads like something you'll hear from an announcer on CNN.  What, the rest of the population is irrelevant?

Link to post
Share on other sites
HawkMan

S they ruled out the parents faking it because no parents would be crazy enough to set their child on fire...

Errr yeah... Except crazy people aren't only that crazy they can beat lot more crazy than that.

This could be anything from Munchausen to psycho paranoid parents.

Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeChipshop
 

 

I'm not convinced it's completely natural either but there have been reports in recent years. I've read them here on Neowin most likely from Hum.

Well **** me i am worng.

Cheers chaps.

It's always fascinated me, i just didn't realise there was any modern day examples.

Link to post
Share on other sites
NJ Louch

It's always fascinated me, i just didn't realise there was any modern day examples.

 

 

I watched a documentary (BBC show called QED) as a kid, it explained some possible reasons and then debunked them.  One being ball lightning.  Scared the living hell outta me ;)

 

Edit:

 

Believe this is it:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeChipshop

I watched a documentary (BBC show called QED) as a kid, it explained some possible reasons and then debunked them.  One being ball lightning.  Scared the living hell outta me ;)

 

Edit:

 

Believe this is it:

Oh jesus i remember that program!

I was a kid at the time and freaked me the hell out. I was adamant it was going to happen to me in my sleep lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
yakumo

keep the kid in hospital for its own safety, with full time camera observation, then we'll see it's unaided.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

I watched a documentary (BBC show called QED) as a kid, it explained some possible reasons and then debunked them.  One being ball lightning.  Scared the living hell outta me ;)

 

Cool video.

 

Apparently that is the same narrator as in A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Moon documentary. (also on YouTube)

 

Arthur C. Clarke covered many of the same stories on his Mysterious World.

Link to post
Share on other sites
majortom1981

what did they use to have light in their hut? what do they use to cook ? I think the explanation is probably easier then people think.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Slugsie

SHC has been examined many many times, and pretty much always demonstrated as something like a 'human candle' type effect. It's a telling fact that in almost every circumstance there is an open flame/source of ignition of some sort in the room. That has in fact been demonstrated under controlled circumstances with pig carcasses. That is not to say that that explanation is the only one however. But no-one has ever explained how a body can just ignite by itself - not saying it can't, just saying that to my knowledge no-one has demonstrated it can.

 

Unfortunately, in this instance however, I'm going to plump for the simpler explanation. Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy. It's much more likely that the parents are abusing their child to get attention than the child is just bursting into flames. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan

Unfortunately, in this instance however, I'm going to plump for the simpler explanation. Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy. It's much more likely that the parents are abusing their child to get attention than the child is just bursting into flames. 

 

Exactly what I was thinking when I read the article.  That child needs to be urgently removed from his parents "care" before they kill him.

Link to post
Share on other sites
M_Lyons10

Wow.  I've never heard of such a thing (And I'm really not sure I believe in it)...

 

I'm not sure what to think...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

Exactly what I was thinking when I read the article.  That child needs to be urgently removed from his parents "care" before they kill him.

Even by some weird happen chance that the parents aren't abusing him, he needs to be removed to figure what exactly what is happening.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

 I think the explanation is probably easier then people think.

If it was, this would have never made the News. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
HawkMan

If it was, this would have never made the News. ;)

 

Hi, welcome, you must be new to the world. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
The_Decryptor

The fact that the doctors are considering SHC, shows that the kid needs better doctors as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
cork1958

Exactly what I was thinking when I read the article.  That child needs to be urgently removed from his parents "care" before they kill him.

 

No doubt about it!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Jefferson Mangubat
      Samsung Galaxy S20 Fan Edition goes on sale in India
      by Jefferson Mangubat

      Samsung's Galaxy S20 Fan Edition, or FE, is now available to purchase in India for ₹49,999 (approximately $680). The handset was first unveiled at Samsung's "Unpacked for Every Fan" event last month.

      The company has announced the phone's availability in the country via Twitter and touted some benefits up to ₹8,000 (roughly $109).

      The Galaxy S20 FE comes in Cloud White, Cloud Navy, Cloud Lavender, Cloud Red, or Cloud Mint color options. It sports a 6.5-inch FullHD+ Infinity-O display with 120Hz refresh rate and a small punch hole for the 32MP front camera.

      At its back, there's a triple camera setup comprising a 12MP primary sensor camera, 12MP ultra-wide shooter, and an 8MP telephoto camera. The camera also features 30X Space Zoom that combines 3x optical zoom and 30x super resolution zoom to let you "zoom from one side of the room to the other."

      The Galaxy S20 FE is powered by an Exynos 990 chipset paired with 8GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 1TB via a microSD card slot. Its battery is 4,500mAh with 25W fast charging support. It can be had through Samsung's online store.

    • By eRajesh
      Xiaomi launches the Mi 10T and Mi 10T Pro in India
      by Rajesh Pandey



      A couple of weeks after its European debut, Xiaomi has launched the Mi 10T and Mi 10T Pro in India. The Mi 10T series is Xiaomi's flagship handset lineup for the second half of 2020 featuring a 6.67-inch 144Hz LCD panel. The Mi 10T and 10T Pro are similar to each other, with only the camera setup on the Pro model being slightly superior.

      Both Mi 10T variants are powered by a Snapdragon 865 chipset, feature a 6.67-inch FHD+ resolution LCD panel with 144Hz refresh rate, up to 8GB of LPDDR5 RAM, and 128GB UFS 3.1 storage. They are powered by a 5,000mAh battery with 33W Dual Split fast charging technology. Other specs of the devices include stereo speakers, X-axis vibration motor, side-mounted fingerprint scanner, Gorilla Glass 5 panels at the front and back, 5G, Bluetooth 5.0, and USB-C.



      One of the highlights of the 144Hz display is that it features Intelligent AdaptiveSync and it can automatically adjust the display refresh rate between 30Hz, 4Hz, 50Hz, 60Hz, 90Hz, 120Hz, and 144Hz depending on the content that is being displayed. Xiaomi says this helps increase the battery life on its devices by 8-10%.

      The Mi 10T Pro features a 108MP primary shooter with OIS. This is paired with a 13MP ultra-wide shooter and a 5MP macro shooter. The regular Mi 10T sports a 64MP primary camera, with other camera sensors remaining the same. The phones also house a 20MP selfie camera at the front. The Mi 10T series is capable of recording 8K videos and comes with six different long exposure modes, Dual Video, and more.

      Coming to the pricing, the Mi 10T is priced at Rs 35,999 for the 6GB/128GB variant, while there's another variant with 8GB RAM and 128GB storage for Rs 39,999. As for the Mi 10T Pro, it is priced at Rs 39,999. Xiaomi is also offering a cashback of up to Rs 3,000 on the Mi 10T series for a limited time. The devices go up for pre-order starting October 15th in the country.

    • By Abhay V
      OnePlus' updated Messages app with categorization features now in the Play Store
      by Abhay Venkatesh



      OnePlus today announced via a blog post that it is bringing its Messages app to the Play Store. The company also announced a design revamp for the app that brings message categorization – segregating messages into transactional, promotional, and one-time passwords (OTPs), in addition to the standard conversation view. Important messages, such as bank transactions, will also be served in a “concise card format” and the app can offer to auto-archive OTPs to reduce clutter.

      Google also is known to be working on a revamp for its hugely popular Messages app, bringing similar functionality aimed at helping users better manage messages and conversations. Such categorization capabilities are not new to messaging apps and have been present in offerings such as Microsoft’s SMS Organizer for a while now. However, for those that prefer first-party apps, OnePlus’ solution would be a welcome addition.

      The option to let the app automatically categorize transaction-related messages and OTPs makes it easier to find the desired conversations and easily clear or archive unwanted temporary OTPs. The concise information cards will also negate the need to look for the most recent messages when it comes to bank transactions.

      The OnePlus Messages app will currently be available in the Play Store only for users in India. Though the store listing has been live for a few weeks now, it is only now being made available for download. Availability is also currently limited to the OnePlus 7 and 7T series of devices. However, the company does promise to bring the “stable version” to more devices in the month. It is not clear when these capabilities for the Messages app will roll out to more regions.

    • By Abhishek Baxi
      Azure Red Hat OpenShift goes live in India to fuel hybrid cloud development
      by Abhishek Baxi



      Microsoft and Red Hat have announced the general availability of Azure Red Hat OpenShift in India to fuel hybrid cloud development in the country. Co-engineered with Red Hat, Azure Red Hat OpenShift brings the industry’s leading Kubernetes platform on Microsoft Azure.

      Azure Red Hat OpenShift enables organizations to use Red Hat OpenShift in their data centers and extend workloads to use the power and scale of Azure services. Businesses can expand resources with public cloud infrastructure while maintaining existing on-premises investments.

      The partnership allows Microsoft to provide a production-ready public cloud foundation that will help businesses in India to create a hybrid environment that meets their current as well as future business needs, including agility, scalability, and efficiency.

      Azure Red Hat OpenShift is jointly operated and supported by the two companies and customers will have the integrated experience, including unified sign-up, on-boarding, service management, and technical support.

      Source: Microsoft

    • By eRajesh
      Google defers Play Store's 30% commission on IAPs until April 2022 in India
      by Rajesh Pandey



      Google updated its payment policy for the Google Play Store last week to make it mandatory for developers to use Play's own billing system for IAPs and pay Google a 30% fee on sales. While this rule was there from before as well, Google never strictly enforced it, which is what changed last week. This led to quite a bit of uproar in India where over 50 startups and companies expressed their unhappiness with the 30% fee. This even led to rumors of the Indian government working on its own local app store alternative.

      Following the backlash though, Google has now decided to defer the 30% commission on IAPs and sale of digital goods from the Play Store in India until at least April 2022. For the rest of the world though, the changes will come into effect from September 2021. By giving Indian app developers such a long period of time before the transition, Google wants to make sure that it does not put them under any undue stress. The time can also be utilized by all the parties involved talking to each other to find a solution to the problem.

      Sameer Samat, VP of product management at Google said the company is "not discussing a change in the model per se but I do feel that we can engage and hear discussion on billing but also other topics they would like to discuss. We can find ways to grow together."

      The executive justifies Google's commission on the sale of digital goods through the Play Store with the number of services it provides to customers if something goes wrong or if an app does not work properly. This is also the reason why the commission is only applicable to the sale of digital goods and not physical goods. Google will also set up listening sessions with Indian startups to understand and alleviate their concerns about this policy change and how they can work together to resolve the issues.

      Samat noted that the policy only affects around 3% of the global developers on Google Play, with around 98% of them already using the Play Store's billing system. However, since the company received a lot of questions from developers from across the globe, it has issued more clarification on this move.

      Source: Economic Times