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Hum

BUTTE, Mont. -- Butte-Silver Bow officials told NBC Montana multiple employees are under investigation after a motion-activated camera was discovered at the Health Department.

According to the county, the employees were reportedly trying to catch paranormal activity. The incident has raised concerns about potential privacy violations.

A trail camera is reportedly the type of camera found at the Health Department. It is used for scouting purposes, is motion activated, and takes pictures in the day or night.

NBC Montana first learned about the camera set up in the Heath Department from an anonymous letter sent to our studio. It alleged that multiple employees had put at least one camera in an office.

"The location of the camera that was recovered was in an unoccupied area where patients or clients were not entering," said Chief Executive Matt Vincent.

Vincent told us the county's human resource office is investigating the matter, and they are taking it very seriously.

"Because it was at the Health Department," explained Vincent, "there's HIPPA requirements, Health Information Privacy Protection Act, that certainly raises it to a much higher level of concern."

Vincent said it doesn't appear that the camera was placed in the department maliciously or criminally.

"It's totally unprofessional and inappropriate," he said. He called it a foolish decision that puts the Health Department and the local government in a compromised position.

We wanted to know more about these types of trail cameras.

"When anything walks by it will snap," said Donald Bromley, a Bob Ward's salesman. "They're like a normal camera, motion triggered. They will take night pictures."

He explained that some of the newer versions of these cameras can capture audio and video, but most just take still pictures.

Vincent explained the police are investigating whether the found camera captured any audio or video, and that they are still getting the details.

"There will be appropriate measures taken depending on what we find when the investigation is concluded," Vincent said.

 

source & video

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compl3x

lol wtf?

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Hum

Unless the camera was mounted in the restrooms, I don't see any big deal.

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adrynalyne

Unless the camera was mounted in the restrooms, I don't see any big deal.

 

 

How about confidential information being seen on forms?

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Lord Method Man

Didn't think that one through, did ya?

 

How about confidential information being seen on forms?

 

The forms are all electronic and therefore already spied on/datamined by Google anyway. :laugh:

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adrynalyne

The forms are all electronic and therefore already spied on/datamined by Google anyway. :laugh:

Well played, sir.

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compl3x

Unless the camera was mounted in the restrooms, I don't see any big deal.

 

 

Except for employees wasting time and taxpayers money (I assume this is a govt. health department) playing ghost hunter?

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Hum

How about confidential information being seen on forms?

I doubt the resolution is that good.

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Growled

Now for the really important question....did they catch any ghosts? :P

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Hum

^ The ghosts reported the camera. ;)

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Growled

^ The ghosts reported the camera. ;)

 

Little snitches. :D

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adrynalyne

I doubt the resolution is that good.

That you doubt means you don't know.

We can all speculate, but unless we know, it is just your speculation.

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