Ghost Child Could Be Responsible For Letterbox in Thames


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Hum

A letterbox bizarrely located in a very hard to reach location is proving a mystery which has got even mind-reader Uri Geller baffled.

The master illusionist and mind-reader admitted he had "never seen anything like it," after spotting the small post box on a buttress of the bridge in Sonning-on-Thames, Berkshire.

Spoon bender extraordinaire Geller, 66, has lived in the picturesque home counties town for 33 years, yet there is no clue about where the inconveniently located post-box comes from.

Recent images of the same section of bridge show it without any sign of the red letterbox, fueling the mystery.

Geller, who has a reputation as a psychic, told BBC he suspected it may have been placed there by the ghost of a small girl which reputedly haunts the bridge.

"This is a very unusual village," he revealed. "There are many sightings of a ghost child that walks on the bridge. Maybe it was the ghost of a mischievous little girl."

Equally clueless about the mystery was Royal Mail itself, which is responsible for the country's 115,000 letter boxes.

Spokesman Val Bodden said: "The recent appearance of a postbox frontage on the side of the river bridge at Sonning is a mystery to us.

"It is certainly not an operational posting facility and we have no knowledge of how it arrived at this location."

source

post-37120-0-24626200-1378947142.jpg

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-T-

Of course it wasn't, now go back to obscurity and pretend to bend spoons

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mudslag

Holy retarded idea Batman....this is someone's prank or art project.

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papercut2008uk

'ghost of a small girl which reputedly haunts the bridge.' PA HA HA HA HA,  Uri Geller's a nutter.

 

some joker got ahold of the front of an old letter box and glued it to the bridge. 

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Growled

I guess they haven't heard of boats and pranks where he lives. He needs to get out more.

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Hum

Maybe the ghost is lonely and wants us to write to her ....

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Crisp

It was a mermaid. I know, I'm a mind reader as well.

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NJ Louch

For crying out loud.  Geller has been debunked time after time, very publicly too.  Why do people still give him the time of day.

 

This will end up as a prank or art project.  It's will be a stick on frontage.

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Hum

^ How about you wade out into the Thames, and get us a close-up photo ... ?

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NJ Louch
^ How about you wade out into the Thames, and get us a close-up photo ... ?

 

After you, seeing as this is your story.

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Aergan

Ghosts? Nah, Dynamo did it whilst out for a stroll. /s

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Hum

After you, seeing as this is your story.

I did not write it.

 

And you live relatively close by.

 

Guess you're afraid of the ghosty ! :laugh:

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Haggis

Uri Geller is a complete idiot lol

 

This was in the paper a few days ago, quote interesting that no one seen or heard anything at all lol

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Hum

^ Maybe Uri made a letterbox out of wood, painted it up, and glued it to the bridge.

 

"My career is over -- I need some publicity!"

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  • 2 weeks later...
Growled

^ Maybe Uri made a letterbox out of wood, painted it up, and glued it to the bridge.

 

"My career is over -- I need some publicity!"

 

It wouldn't surprise me one bit.

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Shiranui

Geller, who has a reputation as a psychic, ...

No, he has a reputation as a prick.

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KingCracker

So this ghost broke into where ever the hell they store those letter boxes and then put it on the bridge? LOL yeah right. 

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NJ Louch
Guess you're afraid of the ghosty

 

I ain't 'fraid of no ghost!

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