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Extending Wi-Fi From the House, to the Garage


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ncc50446    73

Hey,

 

My dad needs to get his wi-fi signal extended from the house, out to the garage. It's a detatched garage, and quite a ways from the house. If the door is open, and you stand right at the door, you can sometimes get 1 bar (If you're lucky).

So he needs a way to be able to get wi-fi out there, near the back of the garage, when the door is closed (As the Stark's say, 'Winter is coming').

What are some good, but hopefully not too expensive options?

 

Thanks :)

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TAZMINATOR    12,430

Get a router or an extender from this company.

 

That will expand the coverage to your garage instead of house only.

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betasp    57

Can you just run a cable? Some cheap plastic conduit, a shovel and Ethernet cable.

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ncc50446    73

Get a router or an extender from this company.

 

That will expand the coverage to your garage instead of house only.

Thank you, I'll take a look :)

 

Can you just run a cable? Some cheap plastic conduit, a shovel and Ethernet cable.

That's a lot of trouble..lol Plus, they have a deck in the way, and things like that too, so was hoping for something that required less work

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ncc50446    73

I use this

Thanks, I'll take a look at those as well :)

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ncc50446    73

Your cheapest solution will be to buy a cheap router and set it up as an AP.

 

Read this thread and pay attention to Budman's posts - http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1091099-boost-wireless-signal-with-ethernet-connection/

I have an extra router (Think I still have it..), and I have setup an accesspoint before..But don't I need to run cable to it? Setting up the access point in the garage, I would need a cat6 cable going from the house, to the garage?

 

The Range Extenders don't seem to be too expensive...About 70$ for a low end one that should be more than strong enough to extend the Wi-Fi to the garage.

 

I'll give him the options, and see what he decides to do.

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Tha Bloo Monkee    591

Get a router capable of running DD-WRT and use it in AP mode.

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betasp    57

I have 3 aps in my home alone. 2 bridged because of the 23 wireless devices. Bridging will work fine but the further away the less performance.

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remixedcat    2,780

One thing to note about range extenders: They halve your bandwidth. They do that because they have to both send and receive at the same time. 

 

One thing to note about homeplug adapters and access points, in this case. However using a homeplug adapter in a garage might not be a good thing becuase of all the line noise from power tools, etc would degrade the signal, thus decreasing your B/W and performance. 

 

Sometimes even having a phone charger or laptop plugged into the same outlet as the homeplug adapter degrades the connection rate and performance. Many manufacturers adivise against that.

 

In your case you would have to decide for yourself. Deal with half B/W from the extender or deal with potential line noise and bad electrical from homeplug type setup. 

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ncc50446    73

One thing to note about range extenders: They halve your bandwidth. They do that because they have to both send and receive at the same time. 

 

One thing to note about homeplug adapters and access points, in this case. However using a homeplug adapter in a garage might not be a good thing becuase of all the line noise from power tools, etc would degrade the signal, thus decreasing your B/W and performance. 

 

Sometimes even having a phone charger or laptop plugged into the same outlet as the homeplug adapter degrades the connection rate and performance. Many manufacturers adivise against that.

 

In your case you would have to decide for yourself. Deal with half B/W from the extender or deal with potential line noise and bad electrical from homeplug type setup. 

I hadn't thought of that..That is something to think about, and something I'll have to tell him about..

 

I have 3 aps in my home alone. 2 bridged because of the 23 wireless devices. Bridging will work fine but the further away the less performance.

That's a lot of wireless devices lol 

 

Get a router capable of running DD-WRT and use it in AP mode.

That's what I used to setup my first AP not that long ago, was fairly simple to setup, and worked pretty good too. Only used it for a month, but worked fairly well.

 

 

Thank you all for your responses, given me a lot to think about :) 

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remixedcat    2,780

I currently have 9 wireless and 3 wired devices and my amped does good. I do TONS of streaming and gaming and working with remote desktops and servers and stuff.

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ncc50446    73

I currently have 9 wireless and 3 wired devices and my amped does good. I do TONS of streaming and gaming and working with remote desktops and servers and stuff.

Thanks for that info :)

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remixedcat    2,780

You're welcome!

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helpifIcan    45

POWER LINE ethernet adapters, you can get a pair for under 50.00. Buy them from a reputible source so that if they don't work (not likely) you can return them without a hassel. Only plug them directly into  an out let or EXTENSION cord no power strip or surge protector.

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farmeunit    699

Ubiquiti NanoBridge.  They're about $80/ea. and you'll need two of them, but they work well and will go several miles with line of sight.

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ncc50446    73

POWER LINE ethernet adapters, you can get a pair for under 50.00. Buy them from a reputible source so that if they don't work (not likely) you can return them without a hassel. Only plug them directly into  an out let or EXTENSION cord no power strip or surge protector.

Wow, those look interesting! Never heard of them before, had to look them up on newegg, and they look pretty interesting, might have to look into those. However...Will they work on separate breakers? The garage has it's own power box, so would that still work?

 

Ubiquiti NanoBridge.  They're about $80/ea. and you'll need two of them, but they work well and will go several miles with line of sight.

A little more expensive than was hoping for, but I'll et him know about that option as well :)

 

Thanks again for all the responses :)

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blade1269    86

I say get a apple AirPort Extreme.

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ncc50446    73

I say get a apple AirPort Extreme.

He does like Apple products, so that is a possibility...Though I can't find anywhere on its range..Needs to easy reach the garage.

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helpifIcan    45

They will work across breakers just not accross the power line like from the pole to another panel.

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ncc50446    73

They will work across breakers just not accross the power line like from the pole to another panel.

Thanks :) I'll have to ask him how he has everything setup then

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