Ghostly vortex appears to damage policeman's car


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Hum

When a strange phenomenon blew through the Hartford Police department's parking lot and damaged an officer's personal vehicle, police turned to NBC Connecticut to help them solve the mystery.

Surveillance video shows a ghost-like wisp of wind whirling around the car, ripping off the mirror, tossing it around a bit and then dropping right back beneath the door.

"At the end of his shift, he went out to his car and found his rear view mirror had been damaged and it was lying there next to his vehicle," said Lt. Brian Foley, spokesman for the Hartford Police Department.

At first, the officer assumed it was the work of vandals, but investigators saw something much more unusual when they looked at surveillance video of the lot.

"Some of the officers said they think the parking lot's haunted," Lt. Foley said.

NBC Connecticut meteorologist Brad Field reviewed the video and gave an explanation that was scientific rather than supernatural.

"I saw this surveillance video and I said, 'What the heck is this,' " Field said.

After checking it more closely, Field realized that the conditions were just right for a dust devil, a tornado-like whip of wind that tends to form over asphalt.

"The only way you can see the dust devil is that it picks up dust and debris into it," Field said.

Call it a dust devil, call it what you will, but investigators call it creepy and said no other cars in the lot were damaged.

"To be able to rip a mirror off a car, throw it around and then put it right back below where it was ripped off is interesting ... to say the least," Foley said. :iiam:

source

 

video 2

post-37120-0-02978800-1383936510.jpg

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Crisp

Dust Devil, nothing ghostly about it.

 

Edit:- just watched the video, to which they also say the same.

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Astra.Xtreme

Blah, such a sensationalist title for something so easily explained...

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zhangm

They invented this word called "wind" - ghostly vortex is just a little over the top.

"To be able to rip a mirror off a car, throw it around and then put it right back below where it was ripped off is interesting ... to say the least," Foley said.

Every sample from a distributed set is interesting, if your sample size is one.

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theyarecomingforyou

Blah, such a sensationalist title for something so easily explained...

Exactly. Nothing "ghostly" about it.

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psionicinversion

I thought dust devils were little vaccuum cleaners, supposed to clean up mess guess this ones a little naughty!!

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neufuse

I thought dust devils were little vaccuum cleaners, supposed to clean up mess guess this ones a little naughty!!

thought that was a dirt devil?

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Hum

They invented this word called "wind" - ghostly vortex is just a little over the top.

 

A dust devil IS a vortex. ;)

 

dust devil

noun

a small whirlwind 10?100 feet (3?30 meters) in diameter and from several hundred to 1000 feet (305 meters) high

 

vor?tex

noun, plural vor?tex?es, vor?ti?ces [-tuh-seez]

 

2.

a whirling mass of air, especially one in the form of a visible column or spiral, as a tornado.

 

 

And I have never seen an opaque dust devil in a town -- only a wind whirling around leaves, trash.

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Hum

^ It looks like Jeannie to me :p

 

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Hum

^ 3-D printed ;)

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compl3x

Wind damges cop car

 

Ghostly vortex appears

 

 

Yeah, the second one sounds more interesting.

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