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SpaceX Dragon 2 - testing & updates

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Draggendrop    5,747

Garrett Reisman narrates first part of commercial crew milestones...

from reddit...

ISPCS 2015: Panel Discussion, Kathryn L. Lueders, Manager, NASA Commercial Crew Program, video is 13:55, SpaceX is first half...

 

 

:)

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Unobscured Vision    2,678

Ahhhh .... *deep sniff of the air* .... neurons. :yes:

I wasn't aware that the new Space Suits were that close to being ready yet?! Niiiiiiice.

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DocM    16,590

Yeah, images of their suit & helmet were on L2 a while back. Sporty.

What was neat about the latest SuperDraco module test video is how they can independently throttle the pair for precision maneuvering. I'll bet that during the DragonFly tests we'll see her do some fancy footwork to demo this.

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Unobscured Vision    2,678

I always figured they were able to be individually throttled. All that's left is a sensor package and appropriate flight software additions for balancing them as needed.

I wonder if they are also intended to be used as a Retro package, or if that duty falls to another. :hmm:

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DocM    16,590

Re-entry retro-burns are done using the regular Draco engines, though in a pinch - why not? That thing isn't exactly short of engines. 

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Draggendrop    5,747

I always figured they were able to be individually throttled. All that's left is a sensor package and appropriate flight software additions for balancing them as needed.

I wonder if they are also intended to be used as a Retro package, or if that duty falls to another. :hmm:

The engine design, as we know, is leading edge, particularly the simulation environment. But one aspect always goes without mention, in many fields...and that is control system engineering....this is what makes everything from sub system operations, to fully autonomous flight control to the ISS and back. This facet of electrical engineering, to the public, has always taken a back seat, when it is one of the most demanding and mathematically complex aspects of most machinery. Control systems can range from a simple bias system for an amplifier stage , all the way to multi platform control. The sensors only supply raw data to the system,  the control system  controls the "show" (aspects can be initiated with or without software). In a lot of our designs, this aspect is routinely overlooked...so don't mind my "plug" for it..it's well deserved.... :D

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Unobscured Vision    2,678

Agreed! It's all of the unseen bits that make everything do what it's supposed to do that deserve the largest applause and recognition. And more often than anything else, those bits are so critical that without them, that system couldn't function -- or worse, wouldn't function safely. 

The Engineers and Scientists plugging away after midnight checking out a piece of code for a secondary flight system could find something and correct it which ultimately prevents a disaster -- and because it worked, nobody would ever know about it, or about their work. Those are my heroes.

Like Marty and the Wonder Workers. The only one of those guys whom we even know the name of is Marty, himself -- but without the Wonder Workers, SpaceX won't get anything off the ground. :yes: It's a Team effort.

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DocM    16,590

Marty is The Man :) (Y)

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DocM    16,590


NASA Orders SpaceX Crew Mission to International Space Station

NASA took a significant step Friday toward expanding research opportunities aboard the International Space Station with its first mission order from Hawthorne, California based-company SpaceX to launch astronauts from U.S. soil.

This is the second in a series of four guaranteed orders NASA will make under the Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contracts. The Boeing Company of Houston received its first crew mission order in May.

"It’s really exciting to see SpaceX and Boeing with hardware in flow for their first crew rotation missions," said Kathy Lueders, manager of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. "It is important to have at least two healthy and robust capabilities from U.S. companies to deliver crew and critical scientific experiments from American soil to the space station throughout its lifespan."

Determination of which company will fly its mission to the station first will be made at a later time. The contracts call for orders to take place prior to certification to support the lead time necessary for missions in late 2017, provided the contractors meet readiness conditions.

Commercial crew missions to the space station, on the Boeing CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft, will restore America’s human spaceflight capabilities and increase the amount of time dedicated to scientific research aboard the orbiting laboratory.

SpaceX’s crew transportation system, including the Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket, has advanced through several development and certification phases. The company recently performed a critical design review, which demonstrated the transportation system has reached a sufficient level of design maturity to work toward fabrication, assembly, integration and test activities.

"The authority to proceed with Dragon's first operational crew mission is a significant milestone in the Commercial Crew Program and a great source of pride for the entire SpaceX team," said Gwynne Shotwell, president and chief operating officer of SpaceX. “When Crew Dragon takes NASA astronauts to the space station in 2017, they will be riding in one of the safest, most reliable spacecraft ever flown. We're honored to be developing this capability for NASA and our country.”

Commercial crew launches will reduce the cost, per seat, of transporting NASA astronauts to the space station compared to what the agency must pay the Russian Federal Space Agency for the same service. If, however, NASA does not receive the full requested funding for CCtCap contracts in fiscal year 2016 and beyond, the agency will be forced to delay future milestones for both U.S. companies and continue its sole reliance on Russia to transport American astronauts to the space station.

Orders under the CCtCap contracts are made two to three years prior to actual mission dates in order to provide time for each company to manufacture and assemble the launch vehicle and spacecraft. Each company also must successfully complete a certification process before NASA will give the final approval for flight. Each contract includes a minimum of two and a maximum potential of six missions.

A standard commercial crew mission to the station will carry up to four NASA or NASA-sponsored crew members and about 220 pounds of pressurized cargo. The spacecraft will remain at the station for up to 210 days, available as an emergency lifeboat during that time.

“Commercial crew launches are really important for helping us meet the demand for research on the space station because it allows us to increase the crew to seven,” said Julie Robinson, International Space Station chief scientist. “Over the long term, it also sets the foundation for scientific access to future commercial research platforms in low- Earth orbit.”

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program manages the CCtCap contracts and is working with each company to ensure commercial transportation system designs and post-certification missions will meet the agency’s safety requirements. Activities that follow the award of missions include a series of mission-related reviews and approvals leading to launch. The program also will be involved in all operational phases of missions to ensure crew safety.

For the latest on Commercial Crew progress, bookmark the program’s blog at:

http://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Astronauts Try Out Crew Dragon Display at SpaceX

 

22762356127_83057c8996_z.thumb.jpg.40205

2015-3379-300x200.thumb.jpg.9410267453c5

Commercial crew astronauts Doug Hurley, Sunita “Suni” Williams and Bob Behnken had the opportunity to evaluate the displays in the Crew Dragon spacecraft at SpaceX’s Hawthorne, California, headquarters.

Hurley, Williams and Behnken are three of four astronauts who were selected to be the first to train to fly to space aboard commercial spacecraft as part of the NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. NASA will decide at a later date which astronauts will fly aboard which spacecraft – SpaceX Crew Dragon and the Boeing CST-100 Starliner. See more photos in Commercial Crew’s Flickr album here.

 https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2015/11/23/astronauts-try-out-crew-dragon-display-at-spacex/

And generic article about 1st order.....

SpaceX receives firm order for its first crew flight

 

16787988882_0b9896dc9f_z-2.thumb.jpg.d63
Artist’s concept of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft. Credit: SpaceX

 

Fresh off a major design review, SpaceX’s human-rated Dragon spaceship has received the first of up to six firm mission orders from NASA under the company’s $2.6 billion commercial crew contract.

The structure of the commercial crew deals with SpaceX and Boeing give each company at least two — and up to six — operational crew rotation missions to the International Space Station.

Those flights are in addition to unpiloted and crewed demonstration missions by SpaceX’s Crew Dragon and Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner capsules in 2017.

Boeing received the first mission order in May, soon after the CST-100 spacecraft’s critical design review, a milestone NASA officials have said would trigger firm commitments for revenue-earning crew rotation flights.

“It’s really exciting to see SpaceX and Boeing with hardware in flow for their first crew rotation missions,” said Kathy Lueders, manager of NASA’s commercial crew program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. “It is important to have at least two healthy and robust capabilities from U.S. companies to deliver crew and critical scientific experiments from American soil to the space station throughout its lifespan.”

NASA has not decided which contractor will fly the first operational flight to the space station with a crew, and officials caution the timing of the orders does not necessarily indicate whether Boeing or SpaceX will get the nod first.

Large article...more at the link...
http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/11/23/spacex-receives-firm-order-for-its-first-crew-flight/

:)

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DocM    16,590

Ballast and a crash test dummy in the left seat.

 

Don't think they're doing much correcting, don't see any regular Draco burps. Probably seeing how self-stable the SuperDraco's can be.
 

 

 

Edited by DocM
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Draggendrop    5,747

Wow...that video says a lot.....she's well on her way, just playing the game now....:D

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DocM    16,590

Differential steering; selective throttling of the 8 SuperDracos gives you high level directional control. Combined with regular Draco engines you get propulsion and 3 axis control.

 

The 3D printed SuperDraco's can throttle 20-100% and pulse. 0-100% thrust ramp in 100 milliseconds. Smaller throttle changes can happen faster.

 

Here's the YouTube video, including a 4x slomo

 

 

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

I was just ready to post the same...I'm slow obviously...:D

 

Stuff starting to litter the forums about it, particularly since it is dated November 24th and where they are now...quite exciting when combined with the thrusters in future use....

 

Dragon_V2.jpg

 

:D

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DocM    16,590

Another view 

 

Quote

On November 24, SpaceX’s Dragon 2, powered by eight SuperDraco engines, executed a picture-perfect propulsive hover test at the company’s rocket development facility in McGregor, Texas.

Eight SuperDraco thrusters, positioned around the perimeter of the vehicle in pairs called “jet packs”, fired up simultaneously to raise the Crew Dragon spacecraft for a five-second hover, generating approximately 33,000 lbs of thrust before returning the vehicle to its resting position. This test was the second of a two-part milestone under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. The first test—a short firing of the engines intended to verify a healthy propulsion system—was completed November 22, and the longer burn two-days later demonstrated vehicle control while hovering.

 

fe9dcbaf82bfe859c754f016fac3b49f.jpg

 

Edited by DocM
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flyingskippy    167

When I first saw D2's Draco configuration, I thought it was ingenious.  Normally you would see at least four thrusters lined up with all the axis of the capsule. They came up with a way of tilting three Dracos just off axis and by firing individually or in combination, have the same freedom of control as before. It also saved wait and maybe even fuel too. 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Yes...full independent control for maneuvering with only a slight (mathematical vector) thrust loss.

 

:)

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DocM    16,590

I wouldn't be a bit surprised if BFS is a massively scaled up Dragon 2. Maybe not as conical, but using many of its principles.

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Draggendrop    5,747

That would be stunning, and just imagining having decks and bulkheads.....I have to stop.....stop.......:woot:

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Unobscured Vision    2,678
Just now, Draggendrop said:

That would be stunning, and just imagining having decks and bulkheads.....I have to stop.....stop.......:woot:

No! Imagine away! That's how SpaceX likes it. Great ideas come from imagination tempered by an educated mind.

 

I draw inspiration from Carl Sagan -- perhaps our greatest Educated Inspirationalist of all. (And yes, that's a word. I checked. :D) He would have loved Kerbal Space Program, if for no other reason than for its' sheer audacity mixed with "the real".

 

That's what helps me dream big dreams. :yes: 

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Draggendrop    5,747
15 minutes ago, DocM said:

I wouldn't be a bit surprised if BFS is a massively scaled up Dragon 2. Maybe not as conical, but using many of its principles.

One advantage would be scalability, and a wealth of knowledge derived from operations of Dragon V1 and V2. This would save a sort of "re-inventing the wheel" here. SpaceX is in the position that no one else is. They have a vision and a motivated crew...I would think that they would take the intelligent approach, yet factor in, that they do have a time line, and go with what works.....and Dragon definitely works.

 

:)

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FloatingFatMan    18,768

Gods, I want to see this beauty fly for real... She's gorgeous, and deserves some wings!

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DocM    16,590
4 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

Gods, I want to see this beauty fly for real... She's gorgeous, and deserves some wings!

They're targeting December of this year for the unmanned orbital test flight to ISS. 

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FloatingFatMan    18,768
2 minutes ago, DocM said:

They're targeting December of this year for the unmanned orbital test flight to ISS. 

I know... It's aaaaaaages away!  I know they gotta be safe and sure and everything, and the last thing I want is for them to take any chances, but I just wanna see her fly!

 

I bet most of the ISS crew want to see her in service too.. The difference between Dragon 2 and the Russian capsules is like the difference between an Aston Martin DB9, and a farm truck...  Who wants to go to work in the truck when there's an Aston in the garage? ;)

 

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DocM    16,590

The Russian crews have been extremely favorable in their comments about Dragon 1 - how spacious it is, the fit & finish, LED lighting etc. They'll get their shot at riding Dragon 2 under a new ride share program.

 

The commercial crew ships and Dream Chaser being a 3rd cargo hauler will also allow a larger ISS crew.

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