• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  

SpaceX Dragon 2 - testing & updates

Recommended Posts

Unobscured Vision    2,678

Having the "Cabin Depress" next to "Deorbit Now" seems a little ... risky ... eh, whatever. Long as it's a multi-step process to actually enter and then execute the command, and a way to back up a step, no problem. Those pesky, fat, spacesuit gloves and all. ;) 

 

I'm thinking (for example) Authorize -> Deorbit Next -> Confirm (where the Autopilot will repeat the command being input and prompt the Pilot for permission to continue) -> Execute, just so there's no mistaking the intent. We want to treat every command as a "big deal", except routine stuff that can be handled automatically that doesn't require human intervention. I've been listening to NASA Mission recordings on YouTube while doing my College Assignments, and about 85% of the comm traffic en route to the Moon was upkeep -- nowadays, those sorts of things can be handled by the onboard systems, and sensors can be installed that can alert the crew if there's an issue. Even the ISS is "high maintenance", but is quite automated by Apollo's standards.

 

That's what I'd like NewSpace to do, among the myriad of things they are already doing, is make spaceflight easier. Not everything needs to be "manual".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan    18,768

Well, y'know.. Sometimes, you just need a big fat red button...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,678
1 minute ago, FloatingFatMan said:

Well, y'know.. Sometimes, you just need a big fat red button...

And a hot interface, with Billie Piper's dulcid tones to soothe us through the workings of said device? :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

They do have to hit DEORBIT NOW (which lights it up) then confirm the action by hitting EXECUTE COMMAND.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop    5,747

From my experience, most anyone can design a simple system...but, a professional spends more time on the "what if's". IMHO, there will be no accidental silliness on the Dragon's....SpaceX knows what it is doing, through a long learning curve.

 

:)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

Apparently the above tweet wasn't just another tethered engine test.

 

I tweeted SpaceX's Garrett Reisman that the week would be complete if they had also accomplished a DragonFly propulsive landing.

:woot:

Edited by DocM
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

SpaceX CCtCap 

 

Program Milestones & Status

 

Recent completions

 

- Certification Baseline Review
- Pad Abort Test
- Avionics Test Bed Activation
- Initial Propulsion Module Testing
- Docking system qualification
- Critical Design Review
- Launch Site Operational Readiness (LSORR)
- Propulsive Descent Testing
- Post Certification Mission 1 Information Review
- Delta Critical Design Review

 

Major Upcoming Milestones

 

- Delta Critical Design Review 2 (dCDR2)
- LSORR for Crew
- Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Integrated Test
- Validation Propulsion Module Testing
- Space Suit Qualification
- Flight Test without Crew Certification Review (FTCR)
- Demo 1 autonomous flight to ISS
- Parachute Qualification Complete
- In-Flight Abort Test
- Design Certification Review (DCR)
- Flight Test Readiness Review (FTRR)
- Demo 2 crewed flight to ISS
- Operations Readiness Review (ORR)
- Certification Review (R)
- Post Certification Missions

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

Sounds like the rest of the propulsive landing tests will be with a more flight fidelity Dragon 2, which would explain the Pad Abort/DragonFly (tethered) vehicles retirement.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

@SpaceX
Backbone of Crew Dragon, the crew-carrying version of Dragon 2 spacecraft, undergoing structural load testing https://t.co/FRgeWJVJ7z

 

IMG_20160623_145526.jpg

 

IMG_20160623_145532.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

Text for above images

 

In 2017, Crew Dragon, the crew-carrying version of the upgraded Dragon 2 spacecraft, will restore the United States’ capability to fly humans to orbit.

The backbone of Dragon 2 is a metallic welded pressure vessel. SpaceX has completed manufacturing of the first two pressure vessels to be used for ground testing, and is currently manufacturing two Crew Dragon flight articles. The pressure vessel is the primary structure of the spacecraft that protects astronauts during ascent, while in outer space, and during entry and landing to provide a safe and controlled environment in which to travel and work.

Here is a picture of the first test article undergoing structural load testing. This demonstrates the spacecraft’s ability to withstand the tremendous forces it’s exposed to during space flight.

When we transport astronauts on Crew Dragon to the International Space Station next year, it will be within one of these pressure vessels that over the coming months will turn into a fully functional spacecraft.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,683

Next year...cool. For some reason I thought it was further out...probably confusing it with the ever changing SLS timeline. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

May 2017 unmanned to ISS, a few months later manned to ISS.

 

Starliner was delayed to 2018 for a few problems, 

 

1) aerodynamic issues need to go to the wind tunnel.

 

2) too heavy.

 

3) there's concern the Starliner launch abort engines could crush the upper dome on the Atlas V Centaur upper stage and make a boomski.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop    5,747

From Doc's above post....

 

spacex_test_article_crew_dragon_062416_9

 

Here is a 3000 x 2000 mouse aim, click to zoom, same image

zoom 3000 x 2000

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan    18,768

I'm really curious to know what actual astronauts think of the Dragon 2, it's interior/exterior design, and its control systems.  Are there any functional simulators they can use, yet?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

NASA's first 4 astronauts for commercial crew flights have been giving both both SpaceX and Boeing feedback on their control systems for almost 2 years.

 

Boeing's looks more traditional with more buttons and switches, and SpaceX's is a further big step to an all-glass cockpit, but under the skin both are very automated and could fly without a pilot. 

 

Crew Dragon 2

 

Each panel can tab through all the necessary control pages, so all 3 would have to fail to lose functionality.

 

2015-2848.jpg

 

21314782411_8e75280eeb_o (1).jpg

 

crew dragon lower panel_1024.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 CST-100 Starliner

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by DocM
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan    18,768

3 of your pics didn't work, Doc. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bguy_1986    356

I got all 3 of em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

Fixed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
flyingskippy    167

Aviation has always pushed an all glass cockpit,  but not willing to go as far as touchscreen UI.  Always worried about power failure or something else that would interfere with the PIC being able to control the aircraft. Nice to see SpaceX pushing the limits once again.  3 screens along with I'm sure auxiliary power is plenty of redundancy. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

It also has a manual "Deorbit Now" button to force an undocking (if needed), bugout, Trunk separation,  reentry burn and chutes -  and there's a backup mechanical "Deploy Chutes" lever.

 

The vehicle is self-righting once it hits the atmosphere due to its center of gravity and shape, so a computerless ballistic entry isn't a problem.

 

This isn't to say it's 100% safe, nothing is, but SpaceX, Boeing and NASA have gone to great lengths with these vehicles.

 

That Boeing's Starliner is running late is in part due to engineering in more safety and closing edge cases.

Edited by DocM
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,678

Yeah, nothing's been left to chance with these new-generation pods -- up to and including direct MMOD impacts and PH breaches. They'll do fine, and they're miles ahead of anything else that's ever been flown in terms of reliability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,592

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,683
19 minutes ago, DocM said:

 

hmmm...if they need a volunteer ... I'll be that volunteer. 

 

Just sayin'

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.