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mudslag

What I find pathetic and funny is that some people try to hard to just talk bull. I said what I said and it still stands firm. Get over it and grow up. Like I said, nothing to hide no problems. Now I am wondering why people are trying to hide something when they have nothing to hide to begin with. No matter how you make yourself sound intelligent still does not deflect my comments, it only in forces it.

 

 

When people are arrested or threatened with arrest for filming police, some while standing on their own property, which has been declared legally within their Rights to do, arguing "nothing to hide no problems" is BS. When people have their bags and persons unconstitutionally searched just for walking down the street, arguing "nothing to hide no problems" is BS. When a teenager is thrown in Rikers for 3 years without being convicted or given a trial, arguing "nothing to hide no problems" is BS. When people have their cars taged with gps and phones tapped by law enforcement who didnt break the law and done without a warrant, arguing "nothing to hide no problems" is BS. 

 

Telling others to grow up when you're the one having problems countering anything replied to you is laughable at best. 

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belto

Now people are being sarcastic and just plain funny.

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Tews

Actually, this has been around for quite a while.  When my son was in the Air Force, he had to get "chipped" when he was stationed at NORAD, in Cheyenne Mountain.  

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Ian W

What I find pathetic and funny is that some people try to hard to just talk bull. I said what I said and it still stands firm. Get over it and grow up. Like I said, nothing to hide no problems. Now I am wondering why people are trying to hide something when they have nothing to hide to begin with. No matter how you make yourself sound intelligent still does not deflect my comments, it only in forces it.

Well it certainly isn't difficult for you to "talk bull". You may say that you have nothing to hide, but you also didn't answer Nick's question, which leads me to believe otherwise.

 

Just to throw out a ridiculous situation, does this mean that you would be happy having surveillance cameras in every room in your house? Bathroom, bedroom, living room, kitchen? After all, you have nothing to hide.

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mudslag

Now people are being sarcastic and just plain funny.

 

 

 

Exactly what's funny and sarcastic about what I said? You can find examples of what I said for everything I listed. Or are we supposed to get that you have a twisted sense of morality and are fine with examples like that happening?

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Growled

 As I said, if you have nothing to hide, no problems.

 

You must live in a different world than I do. Nearly everything our government does is a problem.

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belto

paranoind schizophrenia comes to mind lol

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Growled

^ So does blindness. :D

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mudslag

paranoind schizophrenia comes to mind lol

 

 

Deflecting again I see, is it really that scary to even attempt at having a real conversation with people? Do you know how to use google?

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Nick H.

What I find pathetic and funny is that some people try to hard to just talk bull. I said what I said and it still stands firm. Get over it and grow up. Like I said, nothing to hide no problems. Now I am wondering why people are trying to hide something when they have nothing to hide to begin with. No matter how you make yourself sound intelligent still does not deflect my comments, it only in forces it.

OK. In my mind I've provided enough justification for my position, whereas you keep using the same statement over and over again. I would have enjoyed an actual discussion to understand your point of view, but I see that isn't going to happen. I'm just thankful we don't all have the same mentality as you.

Closing point, as I realise further discussion with you is pointless: attempting to insult someone that has a different view to you is not the way to "win" an argument or get them to see your side of things. In this case you've just made me feel more certain that you're not thinking this through. :/

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FloatingFatMan

What I find pathetic and funny is that some people try to hard to just talk bull. I said what I said and it still stands firm. Get over it and grow up. Like I said, nothing to hide no problems. Now I am wondering why people are trying to hide something when they have nothing to hide to begin with. No matter how you make yourself sound intelligent still does not deflect my comments, it only in forces it.

 

There's a good little robot. *pat*pat*

 

Nicely programmed and obedient, you will make an excellent drone.

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Kelxin

Sounds pretty cool to me. I have nothing to hide.

 

 

Guess you haven't fully pictured a perfect "police state" yet.   I bet you'd have something to hide then, like maybe yourself.   I know we get kinda relaxed here in Colorado, but travel around a bit and you'll see the hate and control in the rest of the country running rampant.   Actually even here, I was pulled over and almost arrested 7 times on mistaken identity, but funny enough, every time they run my plates the picture that pops up looks just like ME instead of the guy that has the warrant (which is an opposite skin tone guy with the same name as me).

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compl3x

By 2014? So what, just over 3 weeks away?

 

And how would they be mandatory, how would you force them on every citizen and what would be the penalty of refusing one?

 

 

As far as privacy is concerned: everyone already gives up their private personal infomation freely. There is no need to be particularly invasive about obtaining it.

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Torolol

The correct way is to implement the chip implant at child birth clinic/hospital,

then mandatory scan for installed chip at first day of compulsory education

or whenever the brats requires some services that provided by government.

Thanks to the influences of the book of Revelation doing this at later age would create chaos instead.

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