Smart TV advice


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FiB3R

A friend of mine asked me if this was a good deal... JVC LT-32TW51J Smart 32" LED TV with Belkin F7D4555uk Smart TV Link

 

To be honest, I'm struggling to work out what that little Belkin box does. Is it just a wi-fi dongle, so you don't need to connect via Ethernet?

 

I'm thinking he'd be better off with this... SAMSUNG UE32F4500 Smart 32" LED TV

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REM2000

for me i always steer people towards samsungs as i love their panels, the smart tv stuff is a little slow and gimmicky but pretty serviceable. 

 

As for the belkin i think you're right it's simply a wifi dongle, some of the cheaper samsungs require a dongle to get them connected to wifi for streaming, internet etc..

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Jason S.

i'd still choose the Samsung. JVC and Belkin are cheap, imo.

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sc302

I would go with the samsung tv, but honestly, I would choose a add on box over the built in samsung stuff..  It is slow, I have it on my bluray player and I have a roku.  The roku is 100000x faster than the samsung when looking up movies and shows.  It will take minutes on the samsung where on the roku takes seconds.

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srbeen

I use plex, hulu, and Netflix on my smart TV. They work quite well. I wouldn't shell out over $20 for a 'smart-enabled TV' as a roku, wd hub, raspberry pi, xios, or any other sub-$100 media player will work much better.

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Brandon H

as far as Smart TVs go Samsung has the best to offer atm

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Roger H.

Moved to Home Theatre

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FiB3R

Thanks Roger, wasn't sure where this should go. Seems very obvious now lol

 

Thanks to everybody else too.

I'm thinking this is an even better option for him, though the price is creeping up... http://www.debenhamsplus.com/DE_LG_TVs___LCD_30043157/version.asp?refsource=DEadwords&crtag=DE&gclid=CIKWh7aEpLsCFRMRtAodqTYAdw

 

I've got an LG 47LM670T, and it's great. I've not had a chance to play with the latest Samsungs.

EDIT: He's bought the LG.

 

Thanks again.

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Jason S.

I would go with the samsung tv, but honestly, I would choose a add on box over the built in samsung stuff..  It is slow, I have it on my bluray player and I have a roku.  The roku is 100000x faster than the samsung when looking up movies and shows.  It will take minutes on the samsung where on the roku takes seconds.

In the case of my Samsung tv, the built-in apps are fast. I dont use them that often, but i'd say theyre just as fast as any built-in apps for the PS3 or Wii U, or even the Roku 2.

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sc302

hard wire is a bit faster than wireless, but it is still slow compared to my roku 3 on wireless.

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