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Would you tell someone to stop using XP even if it's off the internet?

Would you tell people to stop using XP even if it's off the net?  

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+BudMan    3,546

A) go buy a new machine. That means the machine is so old it's not going to handle a new version of windows very well and so if I was going to tell them to get off XP I would tell them to go buy a new computer

Sorry but that is NOT how I read your poll

Your question is

Would you tell someone to stop using XP even if it was disconnected from the internet?

Response

Yes, I would tell them to go buy a new computer

Where in this question or response am I to ASSUME the machine is too old to run 7 or 8, etc. There are users currently that put XP even on hardware they just got ;)

There was window of time when windows 7 came out where the hardware was clearly able to run 7 - but XP was still the major OS available (vista was what a year) I was running XP on my old work machine that was only 4 years old but had XP on it.. It would of ran windows 7 without much issue. But company is still in move from XP to 7.. Some of the hardware is year old than has XP on it.

So why should I assume because they are running XP they are running on X Year old hardware?

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madd-hatter    332

I have nothing against XP. It's still on my parent's PC and although I've considered upgrading them to 7, it wouldn't be worth mixing it up on them. They'd hate it, I don't even have to ask.

 

Older gens take a while to absorb tech. Then, when you switch it up on them, they get really frustrated.

 

If it's your 20-30 yr old buddy at work, tell him it's time to move on. If it's your parents or someone else's parents, may not be worth the hassle for them.

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techbeck    6,925

I have nothing against XP. It's still on my parent's PC and although I've considered upgrading them to 7, it wouldn't be worth mixing it up on them. They'd hate it, I don't even have to ask.

 

Older gens take a while to absorb tech. Then, when you switch it up on them, they get really frustrated.

 

If it's your 20-30 yr old buddy at work, tell him it's time to move on. If it's your parents or someone else's parents, may not be worth the hassle for them.

 

i was actually surprised at how well the older people where I work adapted to Win7.  But everyone is different.

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LUTZIFER    473

I would just tell people that they would have the potential for exploits, etc. etc. and the fact that new software may not be compatible,

but other than that, I have no dislike for XP at all. Was a very good OS, in it's day. The nicest looking IMO.

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Dot Matrix    7,436

I am a very greedy person.  Fixing a computer is fixing a computer, I wouldn't purposely put them in harms way (meaning I'd suggest installing an anti-virus, and anti-malware, and such).. but I won't force them to change their ways.

 

I even look at programming the same way.. I look at how I could monetize code, and make the most money possible.

The fact that you admit to that is even more appalling.

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Phouchg    2,048

The fact that you admit to that is even more appalling.

 

The fact that you refuse to admit this is how most short-term businesses work since the beginning of time and especially since the beginning of computers is perplexing.

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madd-hatter    332

The fact that you admit to that is even more appalling.

The only thing shocking about a human admitting it's greed is the admittance...

 

No big deal, at least he's honest.

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_dandy_    214

If the machine's working fine, there's no plan to install any new software, there's no plan to start using the machine any differently than it's being used right now, and it's not connected to the internet, then it's absolutely fine.

 

I have an XP VM with software installed on it that I don't intend to retire--ever.  Basically, it's running old software that I don't really want to install on other machines as it wasn't designed for anything newer than XP, and (among other things) can't deal with OS restrictions that were introduced with Vista.

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xWhiplash    349

Yes.  What about USB drives that they plug in?  I know somebody that had their computer offline, but got infected because their USB drive had malware on it.

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+warwagon    13,187

Yes.  What about USB drives that they plug in?  I know somebody that had their computer offline, but got infected because their USB drive had malware on it.

 

But how did the malware get on the USB key if they weren't running XP! :D

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firey    3,964

The fact that you admit to that is even more appalling.

 

Show me any successful business where there was no greed monetarily or otherwise.  

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Ambroos    801

The only person I know that still uses XP is my grandmother. She's got an old computer (but with a pretty nice display) she uses for simple games, watching photos, ... The thing is way too slow for 7 or anything else and since it's not connected to the internet and I disabled the USB ports (I re-enable them to update her photos) there's no reason for her to update.

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xWhiplash    349

But how did the malware get on the USB key if they weren't running XP! :D

 

Downloaded the file from another computer.  

 

If they do any sort of data transferring, I would recommend it.  

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+warwagon    13,187

Downloaded the file from another computer.  

 

If they do any sort of data transferring, I would recommend it.  

 

I was making a joke. The joke was how everybody makes it sound like the only way you get malware is if you are still running XP.

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Praetor    988

this pool is very limited and doesn't represent well what you mean warwagon, but anyways...

 

If a user asks me for support for his legacy OS, I'll support it (whatever is possible) but i must mention, in the costumers interest, that the OS he is using is old, lacks security, compatibility and so on; a few weeks ago i had to make an intervention on a Windows 2000 Professional because it was serving an legacy app made just for that client; the client won't buy a new version of the app because this one works very well for their intent so it would be a unjustified spending; also this computer isn't connected to anything, just serving that app.

Of course i mentioned all the problems a Windows 2000 computer has (for example: the time i spend resolving that issue it cost that costumer almost enough to buy a new computer - still cheap considering buying a new computer means new Windows licenses, new upgrade of this app, the cost of the tech service to prepare the computer and that total has a cost higher then that particular service) but in the end the computer works well, does his intended purpose and the costumer still was well served: i served him the necessary warnings of using old hardware and software but i did the job.

 

So every case is a different case; enterprises and domestic clients get top notch service from me, but the security, budget and performance one has from the other can be very different. I tend to think the analogy of a old car and the car mechanic; if a client has a old car and needs to have it repair would i issue him the warnings that car has (old and spend parts, expensing reparing because of lack of parts, so on), repair it and the client leaves with a functional, working car or would i just say no?

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Nick H.    9,947

I wouldn't tell them to drop XP. If it works for them then it works. But I would notify them about the end of support from Microsoft and how they should keep it off the Internet. Heck, I'd fix a Windows 95 machine if someone wanted me to take a look at one.

And if someone came in once Microsoft support had ended, I would still help them while telling them that they should consider upgrading the OS if they want to remain safe online.

Ultimately I realise that I can't force someone to switch, and my job is to fix whatever I am handed wherever possible.

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Anibal P    2,055

I would fix it, recommend an upgrade or new PC and then turn any more business away if they still insist on using XP, just not worth the efforts and headaches dealing with a dead OS 

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DConnell    6,582

I think the best option if asked to fix an XP (or older) system is to repair it, and then, depending on whether the situation warrants it, recommend upgrading. I certainly wouldn't try to force someone to upgrade if they don't want to or can't afford it, but there's no harm in telling the person the possible problems and letting them decide for themselves.

 

I'm actually refurbishing an old laptop for a grad student. It runs XP and can't support higher. It's only meant as an emergency backup system, though. She's well aware of the problems, but she can't afford better, especially for a spare system.

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Praetor    988

Ultimately I realise that I can't force someone to switch, and my job is to fix whatever I am handed wherever possible.

 

Exactly!

Does a new OS makes support more easy for us? Yes

Is the user gonna pay for that new OS (and possibly new hardware)? No

 

Though luck. :D

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xdot.tk    118

Nothing wrong with XP if you're internet savvy enough and security savvy enough...with or without patches from MS.

Gee even my 80 something year old mom has never been OS compromised since she first got her first XP computer about 5~8 years ago. She did fall for a phishing email once and I then decided to put MSE on it.

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+warwagon    13,187

Nothing wrong with XP if you're internet savvy enough and security savvy enough...with or without patches from MS.

 

Zero day vulnerabilities is not something  you want to play around with regardless if you are "Internet savvy and security savvy enough".

 

This is patched and secured

 

stock-footage-solid-french-cheese-parmes

 

This is what XP will look like after April 2014

 

1074987.jpg

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francescob    560

No. XP still works perfectly fine, connected to the internet or not, if set up properly. I don't really think zero days vulnerabilities will be a problem unless you leave internet explorer and outlook express enabled (also remote exploits would be mitigated by the default firewall and routers). It wasn't a problem for router-connected 98/ME machines, I don't see higher chances of that becoming a problem now.

 

The real security problems will very likely start only when the third-party browser and mail clients will stop being updated, I'm pretty sure Mozilla and Google will make sure to mitigate any OS-related exploit that could pass through the browser as long as the platform is supported.

 

Protip: you can disable UPNP, disable DCOM TCP/IP port and even remove the whole Microsoft client/server services (not just the two protocols in the connection properties, the tool you need is Microsoft's snetcfg) and that closes all the ports XP listens to. That's what I do on machines where file sharing is not required since it also significantly reduces the memory usage and boot time.

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+ncoday    432

If it was a consumer/end user, I would strongly recommend they start putting aside money to buy a new computer.

 

If it was a business, I would ask them if they are crazy.

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+Eternal Tempest    805

No, I give my recommendation of what they should do based on what they're using it for.

If there using XP in a potentially dangerous way, I would warn them and let them know some of the issues that could happen. 

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DConnell    6,582

Zero day vulnerabilities is not something  you want to play around with regardless if you are "Internet savvy and security savvy enough".

 

This is patched

 

stock-footage-solid-french-cheese-parmes

 

This is what XP will look like after April 2014

 

1074987.jpg

 

 

Windows XP looks like it will excellent on sandwiches! :laugh:

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