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DocM

>

Yet again, nonsense. We are still in an ice age, which means we have a long time until the next one.

Yes, we are still in the Quaternary glaciation, but we have been in an inter-glacial period as evidenced by the retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet, which is why there isn't 2 miles of ice here in Michigan. That said, we were heading out of this inter-glacial and likely into the formation of a new ice sheet. If "GW" slows that, GOOD!

Every scientific assessment has confirmed that the temperature of the planet is increasing yet somehow you have come to the conclusion that the planet is actually cooling and that climate change has actually helped. It's preposterous. You have nothing to support your position - it's just a fanatical belief, a religion if you will.

See above paragraph. You in haste misread my point.
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TAZMINATOR

^^....this

1978 my parents (and other farmers) had to be extracted from their houses by the Michigan National Guard.

A tank with a snow blade cleared a path for an armored personnel carrier, which was followed by troops and snowmobiles. They were taken out the 2nd floor window, and some drifts were up to the power lines.

Similar conditions during my elementary school days, to the point it was easier to ride horses than drive, including to school.

 

Horses are great ...which we had 5 horses... But the problem was my school was too far away for the horse to go from here to there and back. 

 

There is a house in my subdivision that has some horses ... kinda 'small' farm.. but the rest of the houses are normal which sit a few ft away from each other.   I bet that house owner refused to sell the land to the land development people when the home build company planned to build the houses in this area. Funny huh?

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Arachno 1D

I saw more snow in my childhood than I have in my adulthood in the same region and whilst I don't object to countrys reducing pollution levels it seems kind of sarcastic for some such countrys who used coal to fire their industrial empires to call out the like China and India for their industrial evolution.

To say we have a lot of rain at the moment would be true but had it been slightly colder this would have turned to snow which is quite normal for this time of year in the UK.This doesn't however mean its any warmer globally as we can and have got weeks of warm air currents carrying sand from the Sahara given the right wind directions

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TAZMINATOR

I saw more snow in my childhood than I have in my adulthood in the same region

 

Same here. But had 16" of snow in '94. I was off from work for about a week.

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DocM

Horses are great ...which we had 5 horses... But the problem was my school was too far away for the horse to go from here to there and back.

There is a house in my subdivision that has some horses ... kinda 'small' farm.. but the rest of the houses are normal which sit a few ft away from each other. I bet that house owner refused to sell the land to the land development people when the home build company planned to build the houses in this area. Funny huh?

Don't blame him .

There were 2 one-room school houses (1-6) within 3 miles of our farm, the public school to the North and the Lutheran school to the South. I attended the Lutheran school, which had a better math/science focus.

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HawkMan

I saw more snow in my childhood than I have in my adulthood in the same region and whilst I don't object to countrys reducing pollution levels it seems kind of sarcastic for some such countrys who used coal to fire their industrial empires to call out the like China and India for their industrial evolution.

To say we have a lot of rain at the moment would be true but had it been slightly colder this would have turned to snow which is quite normal for this time of year in the UK.This doesn't however mean its any warmer globally as we can and have got weeks of warm air currents carrying sand from the Sahara given the right wind directions

 

The difference is we didn't know about climate change back then(it's not GW, GW is a symptom), adding to climate change when we know about it is irresponsible. especially when today we have technologies allowing nations moving from developing to industrialized to do it a million times cleaner than we did, heck we're even paying them to do it. 

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theyarecomingforyou

Yes, we are still in the Quaternary glaciation, but we have been in an inter-glacial period as evidenced by the retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet, which is why there isn't 2 miles of ice here in Michigan. That said, we were heading out of this inter-glacial and likely into the formation of a new ice sheet. If "GW" slows that, GOOD!

Where is the scientific consensus to support such a statement? That flies in the face of scientific data showing that the ice caps are melting at their fastest rate and that the temperature of the planet is warming. Your assertion seems to contradict established climate science. Please provide sources to support your claims.

 

 

I saw more snow in my childhood than I have in my adulthood in the same region and whilst I don't object to countrys reducing pollution levels it seems kind of sarcastic for some such countrys who used coal to fire their industrial empires to call out the like China and India for their industrial evolution.

The difference is that their economic output is for the benefit of western nations. We cannot simply outsource our pollution to countries like China and India then complain when they do so in an environmentally damaging way. All western nations should have strict rules on foreign manufacturers, otherwise they're just polluting by proxy.

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Arachno 1D

The reduction in emissions would only get foot hold if the relevant government passed on the technology and reductions to the industries big and small, in question which they are obviously not.

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DocM

Our weather just predicted THUNDERSNOW for tonight.

Thumdersnow is a strong winter thunderstorm that can produce large snowfalls, ice, hail, and tropical storm force winds.

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Astra.Xtreme

Our weather just predicted THUNDERSNOW for tonight.

Thumdersnow is a strong winter thunderstorm that can produce large snowfalls, ice, hail, and tropical storm force winds.

Enjoy!  We just got dumped on all day, and it's headed your way.   I'm really not looking forward to the commute home tonight. :(

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TAZMINATOR

Our weather just predicted THUNDERSNOW for tonight.

Thumdersnow is a strong winter thunderstorm that can produce large snowfalls, ice, hail, and tropical storm force winds.

 

Be safe.

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DocM

Be safe.

Thanks, will do. We're planning on everyone staying put for the duration. The area should be OK so long as no tornadoes form.

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Torolol

what i don't get is why they insist using "Global" warming moniker, while what happened is like this:

in other part of this globe the temperature is rising, while on other part was dropping.

 

that very definition of such fact is not "Global", its either LOCAL warming or LOCAL cooling.

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HawkMan

what i don't get is why they insist using "Global" warming moniker, while what happened is like this:

in other part of this globe the temperature is rising, while on other part was dropping.

that very definition of such fact is not "Global", its either LOCAL warming or LOCAL cooling.

Global warming is used by those who stubbornly refuse to believe in evidence and want to discredit it. Otherwise it's called climate change, but you are somewhat wrong, global warming is a symptom of the man made(accelerated) climate change. While we actually get colder winters, it's only in shorter periods and the winters themselves are getting shorter, but on average the globe is getting warmer.

The bigger issue that DocM is forgetting in his quest to delay the next ice age he thinks is coming, is that the temperature changes isn't the worrying part. It's the fact that what used to be hundred year storms are now happening every year, and we're getting more and more of them and they're getting worse.

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DocM

"Hundred year storm" is a mismomer as you are using it. It only means that the odds of one occurring in any given year is 100:1 (1%), not that they only come every 100 years. The statistical odds of amy given wet season are much higher.

http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/100yearflood.html

And....

http://gardowconsulting.com/category/flooding/

>

Despite the misnomer that a 100-year storm happens only every 100-years, in scientific terms it is the storm that has a 1% probability of happening in any particular year. With probability theory, there is really a 63.4% chance of a 100-year storm occurring in each wet season. Consequently, the chances of another devastating flood happening is much greater than it not occurring.

>

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HawkMan

And meanwhile, while you play numbers games, Storms that used to happen a few times a century are now occuring several times a year the last years and getting more and more common, and stronger. 

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Arachno 1D

 

Top boffins from the British Antarctic Survey say that the Pine Island Glacier - famous as a possible major cause of global-warming-powered sea level rises - was melting just as fast thousands of years ago as it is melting today.

?This paper [just published] is part of a wide range of international scientific efforts to understand the behaviour of this important glacier," explains Professor Mike Bentley, one of the leaders of a BAS effort to find out what's going on with the PIG.

 

"The results are clear in showing a remarkably abrupt thinning of the glacier 8000 years ago," adds the professor.

More...........

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Hum

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of the lakes on the early afternoon of Feb. 19, 2014

 

GreatLakes_frozen.jpg1393007871

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DocM

Yup, ice every f'ing where and today gale force winds to boot.

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