Malaysia Airlines 'loses contact with plane' (and search effort updates)


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Holy conspiracy batman...if this was a small private jet you might be able to pull that off but this was a wide-body Boeing 777, not some run of the mill plane that can just disappear and reappear later on with a new paint job and made up info.

You wouldn't be able to pull it off with a small private jet either.
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The cell phone ringing thing has been proved false at least 20 times in this topic alone.

 

Alrighty, will have to do some backreading.  I literally just found this topic and read the last 2 or 3 pages, but with 12 pages of replies, I didn't take the time to read every single one.

 

I hope they find out something, even if everybody died in a horrible crash.  At least then the families would have an answer, but they've been on pins and needles for a few days now not knowing whether their friends/family are alive or dead, stranded on a island, floating around in liferafts, etc.

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And the passengers?

What about a ransom?

 

I dunno, not enough of it makes sense yet...

The passengers were probably killed off.

 

The goal may have been to sell off the jet, for profit.

 

A Boeing 777-200ER is currently listed at a price of $200-$225 million. The most expensive Boeing 777 can sell for $280 million.

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I hope they find out something, even if everybody died in a horrible crash.  At least then the families would have an answer, but they've been on pins and needles for a few days now not knowing whether their friends/family are alive or dead, stranded on a island, floating around in liferafts, etc.

I'm sure, I can't even imagine what they must be going through.
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The passengers were probably killed off.

 

The goal may have been to sell off the jet, for profit.

 

A Boeing 777-200ER is currently listed at a price of $200-$225 million. The most expensive Boeing 777 can sell for $280 million.

 

 

Once again, retarded theory is retarded.

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The passengers were probably killed off.

 

The goal may have been to sell off the jet, for profit.

 

A Boeing 777-200ER is currently listed at a price of $200-$225 million. The most expensive Boeing 777 can sell for $280 million.

Nobody would buy a 777 that didn't have a maintenance record and sketchy origins. You could strip it down for parts but every single part is tagged with a unique serial number which is traceable...no reputable mechanic would install it. Sure you could take it to your local backyard hillbilly and get it installed but then if the FAA/JAA/other organization comes knocking one day to do an inspection you'll be in a whole lot of ####.

People seem to underestimate just how easy it is to steal a plane. There are no keys, there are no alarms, no biometric finger print reader. As long as you have a basic understanding of how a turbine works and some checklists (both of which are pretty easy to find) any monkey can get on and start an airplane.

The difficulty comes with staying untraceable. There aren't very many planes around, the best selling plane of all time is a Cessna 172 with a total of 44k sold over 40 or so years. When it comes to jets they're even rarer. Then comes the primary and secondary radar avoidance. Secondary radar is pretty easy to disable, but primary is the difficult one. You'd have to stay low, burn a ton of fuel etc and good luck landing at any major controlled airport. Then you have military radar that might pick you up.

 

You just linked me an article about drug dealers being sold a plane and compared it to stealing a plane? Rather different things.
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Interesting side note:

 

Five passengers who checked in for Flight MH370 didn't board the plane, and their luggage was removed from it, Malaysian authorities said. Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said this also was being investigated, but he didn't say whether this was suspicious.

 

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20140310/WIRE/140319990/-1/topic03010

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Interesting side note:

 

Five passengers who checked in for Flight MH370 didn't board the plane, and their luggage was removed from it, Malaysian authorities said. Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said this also was being investigated, but he didn't say whether this was suspicious.

 

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20140310/WIRE/140319990/-1/topic03010

Happens all the time. People check in online, on their phones, drop their bags off and then get held up in duty free, at the restaurant or forget what time their flight was going to leave.

They just remove their bags from the plane and the plane is sent on it's way.

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Nobody would buy a 777 that didn't have a maintenance record and sketchy origins.

 

There are some very rich and unscrupulous people in Asia.

 

Not everyone behaves there as we do in the 'western' world.

 

And $100 million for a 777 would be a tidy profit.

 

http://www.airliners.net/uf/view.file?id=177878&filename=phpZsxuc1.png

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There are some very rich and unscrupulous people in Asia.

 

Not everyone behaves there as we do in the 'western' world.

 

A $100 million for a 777 would be a tidy profit.

And how exactly would you hide a ######ing 777? When things need to be replaced because they're at their EOL or they broke, where are you going to get the parts to fix it? How will you ever be able to fly into any controlled airspace?

You can't call up Boeing and be like "hey Boeing so I happen to own a 777 please send me this part, kthxbye"

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There are about 39 million stolen passports in circulation.

 

The 'Iranian' has turned out to be innocent -- he himself came forward.

 

Radar is much more limited and spotty in southeast Asia.

 

The plane was flown under the radar, to land in some unknown location -- in tact.

 

Jet ID signal was turned off, before the 'turn' and disappearing.

 

This could mean that they were drug dealers, and the plane was hijacked to be repainted, then used for smuggling drugs, or arms.

Some interesting reading here:

 

On May 25, 2003, a Boeing 727 with the registration number N844AA - formerly owned by American Airlines - was stolen from Quatro de Fevereiro Airport in Luanda, Angola. A Miami-based company called Aerospace Sales & Leasing Co. was reported to be its last owner.

Most intelligence agencies believe the missing plane to be in the hands of terrorists or drug dealers.

N844AA was formerly owned by American Airlines, and was one of two at Quatro de Fevereiro in the process of being converted for use by an Africa-based airline. The aircraft had been sitting idle in Angola for 14 months, and it owed more than $4 million in backdated airport fees.

Reports conflict as to whether it was to be used by TAAG Air Angola, or if it was in the process of being converted to a diesel tanker, with seating removed and attachment of aluminium fuel tanks to the floor.

 

Even more interesting:

 

Straits Times of Singapore reported on 7/8/03 that the 727 that departed Luanda under mysterious circumstances had been spotted in Conakry, Guinea:

Canadian pilot Bob Strother spotted the plane on June 28 sporting a Guinean registration number. -- AFP

 

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/3201872

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Some interesting reading here:

 

On May 25, 2003, a Boeing 727 with the registration number N844AA - formerly owned by American Airlines - was stolen from Quatro de Fevereiro Airport in Luanda, Angola. A Miami-based company called Aerospace Sales & Leasing Co. was reported to be its last owner.

Most intelligence agencies believe the missing plane to be in the hands of terrorists or drug dealers.

N844AA was formerly owned by American Airlines, and was one of two at Quatro de Fevereiro in the process of being converted for use by an Africa-based airline. The aircraft had been sitting idle in Angola for 14 months, and it owed more than $4 million in backdated airport fees.

Reports conflict as to whether it was to be used by TAAG Air Angola, or if it was in the process of being converted to a diesel tanker, with seating removed and attachment of aluminium fuel tanks to the floor.

 

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/3201872

You're comparing an ancient 727 with almost no modern technology to a 11 year old 777.

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Facts tend to torpedo conspiracy theories so there's no reason for those nuts to waste time waiting for them.

Clearly the lack of crash evidence points to the plane being hijacked, and landing somewhere -- like Australia. :shiftyninja:

The Bermuda Triangle is now expanding. :shifty:

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You're comparing an ancient 727 with almost no modern technology to a 11 year old 777.

 

 

He's also comparing a stolen plane from an airport, that sat idle for over a year (meaning very little if any attention being paid to it during that theft) and no other people to worry about, to that of a fully packed mid-flight aircraft. 

 

 

 

Hum instead of grasping at straws, which you are clearly doing, why dont you put a check on that conspiracy mind of yours til more factual information comes out. Throwing out wild speculations is nothing but foolishness. 

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Interesting side note:

 

Five passengers who checked in for Flight MH370 didn't board the plane, and their luggage was removed from it, Malaysian authorities said. Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said this also was being investigated, but he didn't say whether this was suspicious.

 

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20140310/WIRE/140319990/-1/topic03010

 

That sort of thing happens all the time...

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He's also comparing a stolen plane from an airport, that sat idle for over a year (meaning very little if any attention being paid to it during that theft) and no other people to worry about, to that of a fully packed mid-flight aircraft.

If anything the thieves probably did the new owners a service. $4 million in backdated airport fees not including the price of the jet? That would end up being more than the plane is worth.

You can buy a 727 for under $1 million and one in really good condition with low cycles and TT is $2.4 million.

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News just said Singapore has sent a submarine to help out, apparently to use its passive sonar to listen for the black box pinger.

As is consistent with US news channels, this is old news. Singapore sent one 2-3 days ago.

But there hasn't been any new information for a while now so time to start bringing up old stuff and rampant speculation to fill the time slots.

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The identity of the passenger traveling with a stolen Austrian passport: He is Eouria Nour Mohammad Mehrdead, 19 from Iran. He was traveling to Germany, where his mother had been waiting for him, with plans to migrate. His mother got in touch with Malaysian police when he failed to arrive and confirmed that she had known that he was traveling with a stolen passport. Check on him found that he was 'not likely to be a member of any terrorist group'. He entered Malaysia on Feb 20.

 

photo here:

 

http://www.astroawani.com/news/show/penumpang-pasport-curi-disahkan-warga-iran-kata-kpn-31662

 

BiZ4CurCYAAUOFM.jpg:large

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Fascinating read:

 

KtDYQf4.jpg

 

 

 

Well hell, they could have flown it to Middle Earth by now. The Elves could be reverse engineering the plane while planning their take over of the human race.  :rolleyes:

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