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+Red King

Good luck. The amount of energy it would take to disrupt a medium to large tornado would mean nukes, and then the blast effects would probably do more damage than the twister.

No, nukes are bad. We need something more green like hydrogen.
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FloatingFatMan

Maybe just stop building towns in the area?

 

It's a bit like over here, where we have idiot developers building housing in flood plains. Then people complain come winter when they get flooded.

 

DUH!

 

If you have to build there, then build appropriate to the danger.

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Pam14160

This is in the wrong thread it should be in jokes from the answers being given. . . :rofl:

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Arachno 1D

China suffers no tornados so logic would say giant walls work...(hee.hee)

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Gerowen

Maybe just stop building towns in the area?

 

It's a bit like over here, where we have idiot developers building housing in flood plains. Then people complain come winter when they get flooded.

 

DUH!

 

If you have to build there, then build appropriate to the danger.

 

Agreed.  It's kind of like New Orleans; I always wondered why people went back there.  I understand it's "home" to a lot of people, and it's terrible that people have to suffer, but when your whole city basically sits in a big bowl, below sea level, and you have to build walls and things to keep the ocean water out, then you're not really allowed to complain when things get a tad wet come hurricane season.

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theyarecomingforyou

Why not just create countertornados that spin in the opposite direction?

Recent phenomenon. Apple invented tornados in 1982.

Scientists are really making a lot of advancements in tornado research. For example, they were recently able to map patterns of this F1 tornado.

Terrible. Just terrible. :no:

 

As for building giants walls to prevent tornados, it seems unlikely that such a crude measure would work against such a complex meteorological occurrence. 

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siah1214

Maybe just stop building towns in the area?

 

It's a bit like over here, where we have idiot developers building housing in flood plains. Then people complain come winter when they get flooded.

 

DUH!

 

If you have to build there, then build appropriate to the danger.

You just rendered half of the US uninhabitable:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_Alley

 

There's something like 100 million people in the colored zone (from TX to Illinois)

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DocM

Tornado Alley doesn't stop at Illinois. Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, the western parts of Tennessee and Kentucky, and a bit of southern Ontario are also in it.

Tornado+Map.jpg

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Anibal P

With everyone on this green trend you'd think that all these half brained ideas would have been tossed out after considering the ecological impact they would cause, but then again we are ignoring it for the wind and solar power trend

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KingCracker

Yeah not going to work we have hills and mountains in TN and we get tornado's some times. 

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siah1214

Tornado Alley doesn't stop at Illinois. Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, the western parts of Tennessee and Kentucky, and a bit of southern Ontario are also in it.

Tornado+Map.jpg

so with that in mind, what do you think of floatingfatman's suggestion of telling all those people they just can't live there any more? :P
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notchinese

I've lived in the red all 26 yrs of my life and have yet to see a tornado. As this map illustrates, the idea that they should stop building in "tornado alley" is beyond idiotic, that's a giant chunk of the country.

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DocM

64 years for me, amd I'be seen many close up.

Not to mention it's most of the nations breadbasket, meat & dairy, waterways, industrial base and fresh water supply.

California and the Southwest has earthquakes, droughts and fires; the Pacific Nortwest has volcanoes and rain 270 days a year; the Gulf and Atlantic coasts have hurricanes, and we have twisters and occaisional earthquakes (most small, but the largest quake storm in the lower US was in Missouri 1811-1812.)

There is no such thing as a "safe" place.

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The Evil Overlord

China suffers no tornados so logic would say giant walls work...(hee.hee)

Except the Great wall of china isn't what it used to be :p

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FloatingFatMan

so with that in mind, what do you think of floatingfatman's suggestion of telling all those people they just can't live there any more? :p

 

Well, I did say "OR build appropriately for the risk!"

 

If you're in an area of high risk, build your stuff underground, or put up with getting flattened from time to time.

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mudslag

Why not just create countertornados that spin in the opposite direction?

 

 

Why not just have Superman fly up them and turn them up?

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+Starry

Well, I did say "OR build appropriately for the risk!"

 

If you're in an area of high risk, build your stuff underground, or put up with getting flattened from time to time.

Sounds like a good way to make building cost three (plus?) times as much and have no natural light.

 

Hell I'm in Zone 3, and we've had some interesting days but nothing that damaged the house.  The areas been hit by a lot more flooding than tornadoes.

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Shiranui

Or create sharknados.

Enough said!

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thechronic

Instead, we should work on building underground buildings and communities in those areas. (We would still have some stuff above ground)

 

So this is how the Morlocks come to be! (H.G Wells - The Time Machine)

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Boo Berry

Why not just create countertornados that spin in the opposite direction?

Well... tornadoes typically spin counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere, however about 1 in 1,000 spin clockwise or anti-cyclonic. :p

 

This is a terrible idea too - the climate effects from building a giant wall like this besides the desired 'stopping tornadoes' effect would be catastrophic. Why try to screw with nature like this? Why not focus efforts instead on improving buildings to better withstand tornadic winds, including mandatory safe rooms being added to every new home in specific regions like the midwest where tornadoes are most frequent? Sure, cost, but the government could give major incentives and tax breaks for doing such things.

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