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Slow transfer speeds over mapped drive


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Draconian Guppy

So I have my old pc setup as a media box over wifi  (dlink 601 wireless n router), mapped a drive to my laptop and access via teamviewer. While trying to transfer some photos to my laptop (around 15gb) the max speeds I get are around 1mb per second. Copying in between different HDs in the same computer is fast (around 90mb per second) So i know it's not the HD. Here's an example:

 

 

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+BudMan

Well if your wireless to wireless no matter what the available shared your going to see /2

Lets look as say a 150N connection - this is RAW total bandwidth in Mbits.. So your /2 off the bat to be honest with what the makers report as bandwidth. And that would be if your using 40mhz -- you could see say 70-80Mbps, more like 40-50Mbps with 20mhz.. So lets say your seeing just a screaming connection at 75Mbps (my /2 example) Now /8 for mb to MB your at say 9MBps now if wireless to wireless do another /2 so your at about 4 to 4.5 MAX!!! If everything running perfect.

You say you saw about 3.4MBps peak which puts you right in the ball park for wireless to wireless on 150N using 20mhz.

If one side is wired, you could get rid of that 2nd /2 and see say 9Mbps.. Still your going to be watching paint dry trying to move GB of files.. Wire is the solution if you ask me. With a good gig connection you can see 70+MBps.. Even with crappy setup 30+MBps should be norm for a gig wired connection.

Don't forget your doing lots of smaller files it seems in your xfer vs just 1 big file, so that hits your performance as well.

Wireless is great for surfing, checking your email - moving large files around, not so much. Until such time that 802.11ad -- next step after AC will you see decent wireless speeds if you ask me. Even AC does not compare to a wired gig network.

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+BudMan

It shows 1MB not 1mb -- there is a big difference! ;)  B is Bytes, b is bits..

 

Its wireless -- are both these devices wireless?  So you auto do a /2 on the bandwidth.  Are they both N, you say old laptop so thinking old wireless card.

 

"mapped a drive to my laptop and access via teamviewer"

 

This is confusing - you did what exactly?  What does teamviewer have to do with a mapped drive?  And you running a TV session to one of the machine in question while your trying to copy files over the same wireless connection?  Again / that available bandwidth in your shared wireless bandwidth for moving the files.

 

If you want to move 15GB of files - I wouldn't do it over wireless unless you don't really care how long it takes..  Plug in with wire, or use usb stick.

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Draconian Guppy

It shows 1MB not 1mb -- there is a big difference! ;)  B is Bytes, b is bits..

 

Its wireless -- are both these devices wireless?  So you auto do a /2 on the bandwidth.  Are they both N, you say old laptop so thinking old wireless card.

 

"mapped a drive to my laptop and access via teamviewer"

 

This is confusing - you did what exactly?  What does teamviewer have to do with a mapped drive?  And you running a TV session to one of the machine in question while your trying to copy files over the same wireless connection?  Again / that available bandwidth in your shared wireless bandwidth for moving the files.

 

If you want to move 15GB of files - I wouldn't do it over wireless unless you don't really care how long it takes..  Plug in with wire, or use usb stick.

Lol sorry about such a short, unexplained post, I was frustrated and just wanted to get it done... I meant:

 

Old PC  = Wireless N dongle 

Laptop = Wireless N on board wifi

Router Dlink DIR 601 - wireless N router.

 

I mapped one of my drives ( the one I use for backup) from my old PC to my laptop (which is where I do all my work). So I had around 10 gb of photos (raw photo files, hence the size) I wanted to move from the old pc to laptop so I could edit it and ETA was 10 hours!!! That's too much. The example above was moving music from old pc to laptop as example for the thread. Thanks for the reminder on MB and Mb :p

 

I use teamviewer for remote sessions into old  pc just in case I ever need to, however, over IP and not internet, wasn't using TV at the moment of the transfer, the highest I saw it get was 3.4MB/s... and to my ignorance I guess that's topping of wireless g/n  I just read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11#802.11g ... in short FML I guess... I think.

 

Off Topic: Ahh soo this would explain why I was getting artifacts on VLC whilst streaming bluray rips... Man Budman, you suck :p No really thanks! Lol I would've lived in complete ignorance... For some reason I thought wireless n was 54MB...

 

I could run a cable from old pc to router, but that would not eliminate the laptop wifi bottleneck...

 

In the end I just hooked up my external drive and passed it over like that :(

 

After having realized this, I guess there's no way around huh budman? With my current hardware, that's as good as it's going to get right?

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jasondefaoite

Do both machines have an gigabit ethernet port? Might be an option to connect the laptop to the old PC directly via a LAN cable, bypassing the router. Assuming both are gigabit capable, should be able to get closer to 80-100MB/s for the transfer rate, depending on the speed of the HDDs.

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jasondefaoite

Budman, I thought 802.11ad was essentially a wireless HDMI solution, very short range?

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+BudMan

While the 60hz band will not go through walls very good, etc. So sure short distances - but if you put an access point in your different rooms you will see very fast speeds to your network.. With a 10Ge backbone which should way down in price by time ad hits main stream you could cover your house with just screaming bandwidth for not all that much money.

Example, currently 10g cards are priced out of the home market. $500 say

http://www.amazon.com/Supermicro-Standard-Low-Profile-10-GIGABIT-AOC-STG-I2/dp/B001344RT2

But give it a few years and sure you will see these in the $100 range for sure. Its not all that hard to run fiber as your home backbone either ;)

Other options for high speed backbone for the home budget would be teaming/bonding.. You can get gig switches for $200 that support say 8 ports in a lacp config, and now your talking!!

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Draconian Guppy

Well if your wireless to wireless no matter what the available shared your going to see /2

Lets look as say a 150N connection - this is RAW total bandwidth in Mbits.. So your /2 off the bat to be honest with what the makers report as bandwidth. And that would be if your using 40mhz -- you could see say 70-80Mbps, more like 40-50Mbps with 20mhz.. So lets say your seeing just a screaming connection at 75Mbps (my /2 example) Now /8 for mb to MB your at say 9MBps now if wireless to wireless do another /2 so your at about 4 to 4.5 MAX!!! If everything running perfect.

You say you saw about 3.4MBps peak which puts you right in the ball park for wireless to wireless on 150N using 20mhz.

If one side is wired, you could get rid of that 2nd /2 and see say 9Mbps.. Still your going to be watching paint dry trying to move GB of files.. Wire is the solution if you ask me. With a good gig connection you can see 70+MBps.. Even with crappy setup 30+MBps should be norm for a gig wired connection.

Don't forget your doing lots of smaller files it seems in your xfer vs just 1 big file, so that hits your performance as well.

Wireless is great for surfing, checking your email - moving large files around, not so much. Until such time that 802.11ad -- next step after AC will you see decent wireless speeds if you ask me. Even AC does not compare to a wired gig network.

Thanks for the opinionated reply, I would've been lost for days :(

 

The only issue I have with running cable, is I just don't want it running through the middle of my apartment as there is no other way :/

 

Do both machines have an gigabit ethernet port? Might be an option to connect the laptop to the old PC directly via a LAN cable, bypassing the router. Assuming both are gigabit capable, should be able to get closer to 80-100MB/s for the transfer rate, depending on the speed of the HDDs.

Yup both gigabit

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+BudMan

Look to say powerline adapters if you can not run a wire.. While they are not as good as an actual ethernet connection end to end [device -- switch -- device].. They can provide way more bandwidth than a wireless connection and more stable to boot.

[device -- powerline ---- powerline -- switch -- device]

or

[device -- switch -- powerline ---- powerline -- switch -- device]

etc..

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/powerline-charts/view

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Riggers

Have you thought about powerline adapters? I don`t need them as iv`e wired the whole house but my sister has them and they seem to work great...

 

To late :rolleyes:

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Draconian Guppy

Look to say powerline adapters if you can not run a wire.. While they are not as good as an actual ethernet connection end to end [device -- switch -- device].. They can provide way more bandwidth than a wireless connection and more stable to boot.

[device -- powerline ---- powerline -- switch -- device]

or

[device -- switch -- powerline ---- powerline -- switch -- device]

etc..

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/powerline-charts/view

 

i

Have you thought about powerline adapters? I don`t need them as iv`e wired the whole house but my sister has them and they seem to work great...

 

To late :rolleyes:

Thanks, I might consider it a solution in the long run as I really don't want to have cable running through the sides of my walls...

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