• 0

Tor + Encrypted VPN


 Share

Question

It is to my understanding that Tor provides anonymity, meaning that people can see what you do, but don't know who you are, while with an encrypted VPN, you get confidentiality, meaning that people can't see what you do, but can get a general idea of who you are using your IP.

 

Would it be possible to obtain anonymity and confidentiality by using Tor and an encrypted VPN together? What would the best configuration for this? (on Linux, preferably)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Wouldn't make a whole lot of sense... The whole point of a VPN tunnel is to push your traffic through that tunnel and out to and specific end point. If you were to access the VPN through Tor you would negate the major benefit of Tor. As you'll be forcing your traffic through a singular endpoint... Tor works so well because the actual endpoint you're pushing out via changes frequently. This often isn't the case with most VPN services...

 

The only thing this can hope to protect your from is deducing your actual IP address as you're hoping to mask it to the VPN tunnel. I'm not sure the extra complexity will actually gain you any real security in this regard.

 

You're better off just using Tor in a proper manner (booted via a live OS like Tails) than you would be by trying to essentially nest VPN tunnels.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Your ISP can know that you're using Tor, but it cannot know what you're doing on Tor. All communication is encrypted.

Ah, I know about ISP monitoring, which is solved with a VPN, but there is also the question of the end node inspection, and I think I read somewhere that monitoring can be done on that end. I thought that could be solved with a VPN.

Wouldn't make a whole lot of sense... The whole point of a VPN tunnel is to push your traffic through that tunnel and out to and specific end point. If you were to access the VPN through Tor you would negate the major benefit of Tor. As you'll be forcing your traffic through a singular endpoint... Tor works so well because the actual endpoint you're pushing out via changes frequently. This often isn't the case with most VPN services...

The only thing this can hope to protect your from is deducing your actual IP address as you're hoping to mask it to the VPN tunnel. I'm not sure the extra complexity will actually gain you any real security in this regard.

You're better off just using Tor in a proper manner (booted via a live OS like Tails) than you would be by trying to essentially nest VPN tunnels.

I found the link that sparked my curiosity in this, https://www.ivpn.net/privacy-guides/why-use-tor-with-a-vpn-service
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Looks like marketing hyperbole.

Tor itself is merely a VPN.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Devices running Android 6.0 or higher will get permission auto-reset feature
      by Paul Hill



      Google is planning to bring Android 11’s permission auto-reset feature to devices running Android 6.0 or higher. This will give users more control over the data that apps can request. The feature will be delivered via an update to the Google Play services and should become available from December 2021.

      The permission auto-reset feature works by resetting sensitive runtime permissions that a user has previously granted if the app hasn’t been used for a few months. In this way, users can be sure about what data the app has access to if they don’t use it regularly; with regards to the permissions, it’ll be as though they just installed the app.

      In some cases, it would not be ideal to revoke permissions access so there are some exceptions to the changes. Google says Device Administrator apps used by enterprises will not have their permissions reset nor will those permissions reset that are enacted by enterprise policy. Additionally, developers will be able to ask users to switch off auto-reset for their app but users should be wary of the potential impact of doing this.

      While users can expect to see this feature begin rolling out in December 2021, it could take until the end of March 2022 until all supported devices get the update. Despite the wait, it’s a nice privacy and security update and it’s good that Google could bring it to devices running Android 6.0, which was released in 2015.

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Teams is getting Customer Lockbox so Microsoft cannot access your data without your approval
      by Usama Jawad

      Microsoft Teams is the online communication and collaboration tool of choice for millions of entities around the globe, including organizations and consumers. In fact, its popularity has soared so much during the pandemic that Microsoft is also integrating it at an OS-level with Windows 11. The company keeps updating Teams with a steady stream of features each month, and now, it has revealed that it is working on Customer Lockbox for the software.

      For those unaware, Customer Lockbox is a capability that Microsoft offers across various services in Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Business, and Azure. It ensures that while performing service operations and troubleshooting, Microsoft cannot get access to your information without your explicit approval.

      While Microsoft engineers generally leverage from telemetry and debugging techniques to troubleshoot problems, in some edge-cases, they do require direct access to customer data. Customer Lockbox essentially adds the customer into the approval workflow at the final step so that they can decide whether they want to give Microsoft access to their information to do root cause analysis (RCA). Customer Lockbox can be toggled and all requests and outcomes are audited. Typically, when engineers request access to data via Customer Lockbox, they also give a timeboxed window under which they will perform their RCA and troubleshooting activities.

      Microsoft has recently started tracking Feature ID 86190 on its Microsoft 365 Roadmap, which states that the company is bringing Customer Lockbox capabilities to Teams as well. The feature is currently in development with an expected release date of March 2022. The capability will roll out to Teams GCC, Worldwide (Standard Multi-Tenant), General Availability, and Web. Microsoft has not yet clarified what data on Teams will be protected by Customer Lockbox.

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Google announces Private Compute Core Services for deeper network and ML model isolation
      by Usama Jawad

      Back when it announced Android 12 in May, Google also announced Private Compute Core. This is an open-source initiative that offers a sandboxed and secure environment that isolates services like Smart Reply, Now Playing, and Live Caption from the rest of the OS and apps. The idea is to keep your data private to your device and utilize the cloud in a privacy-preserving manner. Now, Google has further enhanced this initiative with Private Compute Core Services.



      Google explains that a lot of Android features utilize machine learning to update models to offer you an experience tailored to you. With Private Compute Core Services, the company will ensure that these updates happen over a private path, such that Private Compute Core features like Smart Reply and Live Caption don't have direct access to the network. This will be done by leveraging from specialized open-source APIs which preserve privacy by removing personally identifiable information (PII) and use techniques like Federated Learning, Federated Analytics, and Private information retrieval, some of which it detailed in May too.

      Google boasted that:

      The tech giant has stated that it will publish the source code for Private Compute Core Services publicly so it can be audited by any security researcher.

    • By News Staff
      Price Dropped: Get 5-years of torrent-friendly AdGuard VPN for only $29.99
      by Steven Parker

      Today's highlighted deal comes via our Apps + Software section of the Neowin Deals store, where you can save $247.26 (85%) off a 5-Year subscription to AdGuard VPN. Surf securely and access your favorite content on unlimited devices using torrent-friendly servers.



      Connecting to a VPN gives you an encrypted connection to the Internet. This allows you to stay private, stay secure, and access the online content you want — no matter where you are. AdGuard VPN is a virtual private network (VPN), which is a secure tunnel between two or more devices. This VPN is your ultimate solution for safe internet without restrictions from a trusted developer. A must-have when you need uncompromising online privacy protection. Zero-logging policy and advanced encryption algorithm guarantee that your personal data is not collected and your traffic stays private at all times.

      40+ locations worldwide, check complete list of servers here Own security protocol to provide faster and safer VPN connection Possibility to add websites to exclusions Pings screen to show closest and fastest servers Possibility to choose DNS server (to block ads/trackers) Up to 5 devices connected simultaneously Zero-logging policy guarantees personal data security Trusted developer you can rely on
      Here's the deal:
      Five years of AdGuard VPN normally costs $359, but it can be yours for a Price Dropped $29.99, a saving of $319.01 off. For full terms, specifications, and license info please click the link below.

      There are also discounted 1, and 3 year deals available.

      Get 5 years of AdGuard VPN for just $29.99
      Save 18% off XVIDA Magnetic Wireless Power Bank
      Get 25% More Energy & 50% Faster Charging from This Portable Power Supply Fitted with Apple-Certified MagSafe Magnets

      Get the XVIDA Magnetic Wireless Power Bank for $39.99 (list price $49)

      Not for you?
      That's OK, there are other deals on offer you can check out here.

      Ivacy VPN - 5 years at 87% off NordVPN - 2 years at up to 68% off Private Internet Access VPN - subscriptions at up to 79% off Unlocator VPN or SmartDNS - unblock Geoblock with 7-day free trial Subscribe to Neowin - for $14 a year, or $28 a year for Ad-Free experience Giveaways: Apple Giveaway | Gaming Giveaway | Amazon Giveaway Neowin Deals · Free eBooks · Neowin Store

      Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs.


    • By zikalify
      Vodafone issues a warning of the risks of so-called sharenting
      by Paul Hill



      Vodafone has issued a warning about oversharing information about your children on social media which is calls sharenting. So-called sharenting is a pretty recent phenomenon and as such, will pose risks that people had not foreseen when uploading pictures and sharing details of their children’s lives online.

      Speaking to Vodafone, Dr Claire Bessant, an associate law professor from Northumbria University, said the consequences of sharenting could include a loss of privacy via accidentally shared metadata, embarrassment and anxiety, ridicule or bullying, unwanted attention, denying kids the right to build their own online identity, the possibility of identity theft, and the misuse of images and videos by paedophiles.

      Content that parents regularly share about their children online includes full names, images of their children not fully dressed, their children’s birth date (directly and from birthday photos being shared), and information about which school they go to which could put them in danger away from home.

      Parents wanting to share photos and videos of their children online can take proactive measures to ensure that the content is not used for malicious purposes. For example, you can limit the audience of posts so only those you trust can see the content. Additionally, you can use emoji to cover children’s faces if you want to keep them anonymous – if you’re not confident doing this, you can also take photos from a distance to reduce facial details or take photos from behind their heads or over their shoulders.

      Vodafone warned that it’s not only parents who have to be careful but also a child’s other carers who might think it’s harmless to share content online. In the case of older children, an expert talking to Vodafone said that parents should give their children a veto so they can choose which content gets shared online.