SSD info shows "frozen" state. after secure erasing also shows "frozen" - BIOS probl


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coolguy80

(Firstly, my query is not about how to secure erase a SSD.)
I have a new 330 SSD which is recently connected to my system aimed to install Debian Linux. SSD firmware version is 300i which appears to be the latest version. I booted gparted livecd and ran hdparm(a Linux storage info utility) and it shows that the drive is in "frozen" state. I secure erased it after power cycling(removing sata power cable for a few seconds and re-plug). But, to my surprise, SSD is again "frozen" on next boot. This is when, I suspect BIOS is locking/freezing SSD somehow. I have a Intel DH67CL1 BIOS updated to latest version.(This board has a option to enable "UEFI" -in case it helps). 
SMART shows SSD is fine. My doubt is, How to bypass BIOS detecting the drive and set lock/freeze? In another forum(can quote source if needed) a member points out below options as the solution, none of them I can think to execute myself without assistance:
 


BIOS's sometimes set the freeze state of a drive. Once that is set, you are stuck and cannot erase the drive. In order to "un-freeze" the drive you must 'reset' the drive WITHOUT letting the BIOS get involved. Easiest way to do this is to power cycle the drive.

Of course, hot swap must work or the drive won't be detected by the OS, which is why you had to turn on AHCI.

In summary:

If BIOS 'freeze's a drive, your options are:
1 - 'thaw' (un-freeze?) the drive by power cycling JUST THE DRIVE and not the computer.
2 - get a BIOS that doesn't freeze drives.
3 - do not let the BIOS see the drive during bootup.


This is the info shown by hdparm(note the frozen state mentioned):

Security: 
	Master password revision code = 65534
		supported
	not	enabled
	not	locked
		frozen
	not	expired: security count
		supported: enhanced erase
	4min for SECURITY ERASE UNIT. 2min for ENHANCED SECURITY ERASE UNIT. 
Logical Unit WWN Device Identifier: 
	NAA		: 
	IEEE OUI	: 
	Unique ID	: 
Checksum: correct

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xendrome

Did you use some type of secure erase tool to write over your data on the SSD? If so you likely just bricked the drive. SSDs don't write-re-write data the same way a HDD does.

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coolguy80

Did you use some type of secure erase tool to write over your data on the SSD? If so you likely just bricked the drive. SSDs don't write-re-write data the same way a HDD does.

This was a new SSD and I've no Data in the SSD. I've used hdparm to secure erase SSD since it was frozen and I can do that again. but, the problem is, BIOS locks/freeze the SSD even if I do that. BIOS sets some password or something which locks down SSD.

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glen8

Yes, SSDs are always in a locked state when you reboot.

 

What is it that you can't do, install linux?

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coolguy80

Yes, SSDs are always in a locked state when you reboot.

 

What is it that you can't do, install linux?

I can install Linux. I am worried about SSD info showing it is "frozen".  Shall I format with a msdos(MBR) partition table and partition the drive, install Linux? is the "frozen" message something to worry? from what I read, it is definitely something wrong with either drive or BIOS.

 

Freeze lock is just a security feature.  The BIOS tells the drive to lock it's security, this was introduced to stop virus's and other malware erasing your drive or setting a password and then holding you to ransom to get your data back.

"SSD freeze lock" happens  even before installing, that's what is worrying me.

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coolguy80

 

Did you try booting up without the power to the drive plugged in then once everything is up and running plug in the drive and do the format then?

 

Have a look at the tips/explanation on this page

http://www.overclock.net/t/1227597/how-to-secure-erase-your-solid-state-drive-ssd-with-parted-magic

yes. I've done that once to "unfreeze" the drive. the thing is, without any OS or even partition table, SSD shows "freeze locked". pls see my first post(small font).

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coolguy80

I plan to do these steps:

  1. Secure erase SSD after power cycling.
  2. boot gparted live cd removing my existing hard drive(hard drive, SSD and DVD drive shares the same power cable from a seasonic psu)
  3. connect SSD sata connectors
  4. if SSD is detected, partition with MBR and install Linux

If I install Linux as mentioned above, will the BIOS security "Freeze/Lock" reappear? Also, this BIOS has a UEFI mode, shall I try to use it since I don't want to install Windows on SSD.

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coolguy80

Hi, Can anyone confirm if it is normal for SSD to show frozen state on every boot(even after secure erase). this is where BIOS/UEFI which I believe security freeze lock SSD each time. So please suggest a solution.

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goretsky

Hello,

 

From what I recall of reading a Parted Magic tutorial, it is normal to see the SSD show up as frozen.  You have to suspend the computer and then resume it for it to appear unfrozen so that a Secure Erase can be done. 

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

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Taliseian

I've have used Parted Magic several times on my SSD - occasionally I have found it to be in a "frozen" state.

 

There are two methods I've used, and both have worked to get it unfrozen.

 

1) Hibernate, let sit for at least 30sec min, then wake

2) Completely power down for at least 1min, then reboot

 

Hope this helps....

 

 

T

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coolguy80

I've have used Parted Magic several times on my SSD - occasionally I have found it to be in a "frozen" state.

 

There are two methods I've used, and both have worked to get it unfrozen.

 

1) Hibernate, let sit for at least 30sec min, then wake

2) Completely power down for at least 1min, then reboot

 

Hope this helps....

 

 

T

 

If I boot gparted/parted magic etc, hdparm shows SSD as frozen. it was once secure erased by power cycling(removing sata power cable and reinsert). my doubt is, is it normal for SSD to show frozen without any partition table/OS/Data? My concerns are listed in post #9

Hello,

 

From what I recall of reading a Parted Magic tutorial, it is normal to see the SSD show up as frozen.  You have to suspend the computer and then resume it for it to appear unfrozen so that a Secure Erase can be done. 

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

There is a problem with suspend/hibernate in my system. It used to suspend/hibernate. now, if I run

Sep 13 00:46:23 localhost kernel: [ 1105.077074] Freezing of tasks failed after 20.00 seconds (1 tasks refusing to freeze, wq_busy=0):

this is attributed to some usb interaction error which I am yet to find a solution: kernel hub daemon thread [khubd] process is not sleeping/freezing. BTW, this is needed for keyboard and mouse as both are usb devices. so, powercycling will be the sole solution.

BUT - in my case, SSD if unfreezed, still shows frozen status owing to BIOS/UEFI which security freeze locks SSD for unknown reason. So, I have to remove SSD and reinsert after BIOS boot so as to prevent freeze locking SSD. this is  my main doubt/

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goretsky

Hello,

So, would enabling BIOS Legacy Mode/CSM support solve the problem for you?

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

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coolguy80

Hello,

So, would enabling BIOS Legacy Mode/CSM support solve the problem for you?

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

No. I have tried both.

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coolguy80

I think, my question is not clear. for clarification, I can explain as: Attaching a brand new SSD to my existing computer. consider there are no other hard drives but, this unpartitioned SSD only.
1. I set BIOS(Intel DH67CL1) in UEFI enabled mode and booted with gparted live cd.
2. This CD does not comes with suspend/hibernate support. so, it may mean, I've to download pm-utils from repo into live cd and try suspending? yes, I've tried that and kernel "khubd" thread is preventing suspend from happening.
So, what options exists to unfreeze and install Linux into the new SSD?
If I hotplug SSD into sata port after UEFI/BIOS loads, will that work? is hotplugging ok with SSD's?

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coolguy80

I have got the answers. since the hdparm shows that the SSD drive is "not locked" but "frozen". it is the mainboard/motherboard BIOS which is the culprit. this actually means that you can install/format SSD fine and it works but SSD/hard drive encryption will not work. thanks to @Seth for the answers. here:

http://sstahlman.blogspot.in/2014/07/hardware-fde-with-intel-ssd-330-on.html?showComment=1411210716807#c8848167083498438184

Updated wiki:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives#Hdparm_shows_.22frozen.22_state

 

Intel provides basic BIOS/UEFI for mainboards and no support at all. how horrible! if the bios supported security freeze lock enable/disable and such advanced options, this problem will not arise.

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