Woman sent to prison in bingo assault


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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. ?  A Jefferson City woman was sentenced to five years in prison for assaulting two people over splitting $200 in bingo winnings.

Fifty-two-year-old Margaret Thomas of Jefferson City was given credit for time served after pleading guilty Monday to second-degree assault in a plea deal. She was originally charged with first-degree domestic assault and armed criminal action.

Police say Thomas stabbed two Jefferson City residents with scissors as they returned from playing bingo in Moberly in October 2013.

The Jefferson City News-Tribune reports  the three were on U.S. 63 near Ashland when Thomas stopped the vehicle and stabbed one victim, who required 32 stitches. Police say the second victim was hurt while helping the first victim.

Thomas then left the two passengers on the side of the road.

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