SpaceX Dragon CRS-5 ISS resupply


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DocM

SpaceX Dragon CRS-5 ISS resupply

Launch date: Dec. 9, 2014

Window: 1715 Local (Eastern)

This date could move because of cargo shuffling caused by the Antares/Cygnus explosion. At the least a large high pressure nitrogen tanks backup will be loaded into Dragon, replacing a lower priority high pressure oxygen tank.

The Cygnus loss will ripple through not only the Dragon manifests but HTV and Progress as well.

Trunk payload,

Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), a laser instrument to measure clouds and the location and distribution of pollution, dust, smoke, and other particulates in the atmosphere. The laser will operate at wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm.

http://www.nasa.gov/cats/#.VGqRYyUo7qA

A stage landing on a 300x170 foot catamaran barge is planned, assuming it's completed in time. They're pushing hard. The barge will use GPS and thrusters for stabilization.

FAA docs posted on NASASpaceFlight about the barge radio beacons show if it is used the landing will be offshore of Jacksonville, Florida at North 30 49 54, West 78 6 29.

https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=62792

There is no info yet as to if the CRS-5 first stage will have the maneuvering grid fins first seen on F9R Dev-1's interstage.

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DocM

Looks like CRS-5 is moving later into December. No date yet. As expected, shuffling cargo due to the loss of the last Cygnus.

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DocM

NASASpaceFlight reports,

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/11/crs-5-dragon-mission-iss-evaluating-december-target/

Launch: December 16, with back up dates of the 19th and 20th.

Berthing at ISS: December 18, if launched on the 16th.

Cargo (pressurized): 3,310 kg (7,300 lb).

CRS-5's first stage will be the first to use the grid fins developed on F9R Dev-1. These are used for both hypersonic and subsonic steering during stage landings.

View of grid fins from the top of FR Dev-1

jr51zezzejya661xlmkl.gif

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IsItPluggedIn

At least the delay will give them time to finish the barge.

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DocM

Yup.

As to the launch time, it should be around 1430 Local (Eastern) with the landing ~8 minutes later. Instant window, no slack.

It would be so damned cool if they had quadcopter mounted cams on the air shooting 4K video :)

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DocM

The updated Dec. 1 FCC application for CRS-5 launch and ship frequencies gives the coordinates for ASDS and it's tender ship.

Some NSF users have driven or kayaked by the ASDS construction & painting sites and it's gone, presumably on it's way to Florida.

From the FCC docs,

>

Purpose Of Operation: Launch vehicle communications.Commercial resupply run to International Space Station for NASA customer.

Station Locations

(1) MOBILE: Complex 40, Cape Canaveral AFS, Florida: Launch Vehicle 1st Stage Suborbital Trajectory

(2) MOBILE: Complex 40, Cape Canaveral AFS, Florida: Launch Vehicle 2nd Stage Orbital Trajectory Cape

(3) Canaveral AFS (BREVARD), FL - NL 28-33-00; WL 80-34-00

(4) MOBILE: BOAT, within 20 nautical miles, within 38 km, centered around NL 30-49-54; WL 78-06-29

(5) MOBILE: BARGE, within 20 nautical miles, within 38 km, centered around NL 30-49-54; WL 78-06-29>

Which puts them about here

97373244334f7a4b219a4f5df353e4d7.jpg

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flyingskippy

That is quite a ways out. This one is really going to be exciting!

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DocM

December 9, 2014

NASA Updates Briefings for Fifth SpaceX Resupply Mission to Space Station

The fifth SpaceX cargo mission to the International Space Station (ISS) under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services contract is scheduled to launch at 2:31 p.m. EST Tuesday, Dec. 16, from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 1:15 p.m.

NASA will host a series of prelaunch news conferences Monday, Dec. 15 at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. All briefings, which are subject to a change in time, will air live on NASA TV and the agency's website.

The first briefing, airing at 10 a.m., will cover the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) Earth science instrument headed to the space station. Participants for this briefing will be:

-- Julie Robinson, ISS Program chief scientist at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston

-- Colleen Hartman, deputy director for science at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland

-- Robert J. Swap, program scientist with the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington

-- Matthew McGill, CATS principal investigator at Goddard

The second briefing, at 12:30 p.m., will provide up-to-date information about the launch. Participants for the prelaunch briefing will be:

-- Mike Suffredini, NASAs ISS Program manager

-- Hans Koenigsmann, vice president for Mission Assurance at SpaceX

-- Kathy Winters with the U.S. Air Forces 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base in Florida

The final briefing of the day, at 2 p.m., will cover some of the numerous science investigations headed to the space station. Participants for the science briefing will be:

-- Julie Robinson, NASAs ISS Program chief scientist

-- Michael Roberts, senior research pathway manager at the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, headquartered in Melbourne, Florida

-- Cheryl Nickerson, Micro-5 principal investigator at Arizona State University

-- Samuel Durrance, NR-SABOL principal investigator at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne

Media and the public can join the conversation using #ISScargo and #SpaceX5, and ask questions using #askNASA.

For more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

For an updated schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1FrjDEO

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

For NASA TV schedule and video streaming information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For more information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

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Beittil

Daytime launch, nice. I hope the ASDS gets to the landing zone in time and that SpaceX can show us the most awesome footage ever produced in rocketry :D

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DocM

Slipped to the 19th,

December 11, 2014

MEDIA ADVISORY M14-201

NASA, SpaceX Update Launch of Resupply Mission to the Space Station

The fifth SpaceX cargo mission to the International Space Station (ISS) under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services contract now is scheduled to launch no earlier than 1:20 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 19, from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 12:15 p.m.

The change of launch date allows SpaceX to take extra time to ensure they do everything possible on the ground to prepare for a successful launch. Both the Falcon 9 rocket and its Dragon spacecraft are in good health.

The prelaunch news conferences also have moved to Thursday, Dec. 18 at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. All briefings, which are subject to a change in time, will air live on NASA TV and the agency's website.

The first briefing of the day will air at noon and will provide up-to-date information about the launch. Participants for the prelaunch briefing will be:

Mike Suffredini, NASA?s ISS Program manager

Hans Koenigsmann, vice president for Mission Assurance at SpaceX

Kathy Winters with the U.S. Air Force?s 45th Weather Squadron at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida

The second briefing, now at 1:30 p.m., will cover some of the numerous science investigations headed to the space station. Participants for the science briefing will be:

Julie Robinson, NASA?s ISS Program chief scientist

Michael Roberts, senior research pathway manager at the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, headquartered in Melbourne, Florida

Cheryl Nickerson, Micro-5 principal investigator at Arizona State University

Samuel Durrance, NR-SABOL principal investigator at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne

The final briefing, now at 3 p.m., will cover the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) Earth science instrument headed to the space station. Participants for this briefing will be:

Julie Robinson, ISS Program chief scientist at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston

Colleen Hartman, deputy director for science at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland

Robert J. Swap, program scientist with the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington

Matthew McGill, CATS principal investigator at Goddard

An on-time launch on Dec. 19 will result in the Dragon spacecraft arriving at the space station on Sunday, Dec. 21. Expedition 42 Commander Barry "Butch" Wilmore of NASA will use the station's 57.7-foot robotic arm to reach out and capture it at approximately 6 a.m. Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency will support Wilmore as they operate from the station's cupola. NASA TV coverage of grapple will begin at 4:30 a.m. Coverage of Dragon's installation to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin 9 a.m.

For more information about media accreditation at Kennedy, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

For an updated schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1FrjDEO

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

For NASA TV schedule and video streaming information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For more information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-

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IsItPluggedIn

So what does this mean?

 

The change of launch date allows SpaceX to take extra time to ensure they do everything possible on the ground to prepare for a successful launch. Both the Falcon 9 rocket and its Dragon spacecraft are in good health.

 

Just that SpaceX wanted more time? Or is a NASA ass covering?

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DocM

SpaceX wants more time. Nothing 30 hours in a day wouldn't cure .

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DocM

http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/12/16/x-marks-spot-falcon-9-attempts-ocean-platform-landing

>

The autonomous spaceport drone ship is 300 by 100 feet, with wings that extend its width to 170 feet. While that may sound huge at first, to a Falcon 9 first stage coming from space, it seems very small. The legspan of the Falcon 9 first stage is about 70 feet and while the ship is equipped with powerful thrusters to help it stay in place, it is not actually anchored, so finding the bullseye becomes particularly tricky. During previous attempts, we could only expect a landing accuracy of within 10km. For this attempt, were targeting a landing accuracy of within 10 meters.

A key upgrade to enable precision targeting of the Falcon 9 all the way to touchdown is the addition of four hypersonic grid fins placed in an X-wing configuration around the vehicle, stowed on ascent and deployed on reentry to control the stages lift vector. Each fin moves independently for roll, pitch and yaw, and combined with the engine gimbaling, will allow for precision landing first on the autonomous spaceport drone ship, and eventually on land.

>

autonomous_spaceport_drone_ship.jpg
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DocM

CRS-5 static fire scrubbed, looking at tomorrow.

Payloads,

-CATS (Cloud-Aerosol Transport System)

-Microbial Observatory-1

-Flatworm Regeneration

-Wearable Monitoring (ASI payload)

-Free-Space PADLES (Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiment in Space) (JAXA payload)

-Fruit Fly Lab-01

-etc.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spacex_cats/index.html

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/fruit_fly_lab01/

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Beittil

No show tomorrow.

 

Launch slipped to january 6th of the new year due to issues that came up during an attempt at static fire yesterday.

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DocM

The static fire is just part of it. Even a short delay at this point causes problems with both the KSC holiday schedule and ISS's Beta Angle.

Basically, ISS's orbital plane is entering a point in its cycle where the station is in constant sunlight. This can cause thermal problems for visiting vehicles, so launches are delayed until this is relieved. Early January is the next opportunity.

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Beittil

Even if Dragon did launch it would still be at the station during that period, so hoe would that really be a problem?

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DocM

The Beta Angle for ISS cycles between -75 and +75 degrees. When it exceeds 60 degrees, which happens a few times a year, there's too much Sun exposure for visiting vehicles and they overheat. Even the Shuttle.

A BEO (lunar, Mars etc.) version of a vehicle is designed to handle this, larger radiators etc., but for ISS taxis that would sacrifice cargo capability.

Another thing a BEO vehicle can do is orient itself so it's smallest surface faceless the Sun during y he trip, example being Dragon's trunk or a future service module, but that's not possible when docked.

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DocM

December 18, 2014

NASA, SpaceX Update Launch of Fifth SpaceX Resupply Mission to Space Station

NASA and SpaceX announced today the launch of SpaceX's fifth commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station now will occur no earlier than Tuesday, Jan. 6.

The new launch date will provide SpaceX engineers time to investigate further issues that arose from a static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket on Dec. 16 and will avoid beta angle constraints for berthing the Dragon cargo ship to the station that exist through the end of the year.

A beta angle is the position of the sun relative to mechanical structures on the space station. During the time of high beta angles, which run from Dec. 28 through Jan. 7, thermal and operational constraints prohibit Dragon from berthing to the station.

Space station managers will meet Monday, Jan. 5, for a readiness review in advance of the launch attempt Jan. 6. The launch postponement has no impact on the station's crew or its complement of food, fuel and supplies and will not affect the science being delivered to the crew once Dragon arrives at the station.

The launch is scheduled at approximately 6:18 a.m. EST. NASA Television coverage will begin at 5 a.m.

A backup launch attempt is available Wednesday, Jan. 7.

A launch on Jan. 6 will result in a rendezvous and grapple of Dragon Thursday, Jan. 8, at approximately 6 a.m. NASA TV coverage will begin at 4:30 a.m. Installation coverage will begin at 9 a.m.

Prelaunch briefings at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida will be rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 5, with times still to be determined.

For an updated schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1FrjDEO

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

For NASA TV schedule and video streaming information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For more information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-

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IsItPluggedIn

They really need to get these things sorted, I know nearly all of their launches were successful, however how many of them have been delayed, it seems like every launch is delayed. Not all their fault, but im impatient and want things now. I was going to get up and watch this one, but I suppose I will have to walk down the street and look at the Tesla's through the window.

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DocM

To be fair, a recent Delta flight was scrubbed several times. Not as unusual as you'd think.

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DocM

Static fire nominal, checking data.

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DocM

http://www.spacex.com/press/2014/12/19/crs-5-launch-update

Today, SpaceX completed a successful static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket in advance of the CRS-5 mission for NASA. The test was conducted at SpaceX?s Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, and ran for the full planned duration.

SpaceX also conducted a static fire test on December 17 and while the test accomplished nearly all goals, it did not run the full duration. The data suggested we could have pushed forward without a second attempt, but out of an abundance of caution, we opted to execute a second test.

Given the extra time needed for data review and testing, coupled with the limited launch date availability due to the holidays and other restrictions, our earliest launch opportunity is now January 6 with January 7 as a backup. A few times a year, the ISS orbits through a high beta angle period. This is where the angle between the ISS orbital plane and the sun is high, resulting in the ISS being in almost constant sunlight for a 10 day period. During this time, there are thermal and operational constraints that prohibit Dragon from being allowed to berth with the ISS. This high beta period runs from December 28, 2014 ? January 7, 2015. Note that for a launch on January 6, Dragon berths on January 8.

After today?s successful static fire, our teams are looking forward to launch just after the New Year.

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