SpaceX Dragon CRS-5 ISS resupply


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Beittil

Well, it came in a bit low and hard. It's lower section (legs/engines) slammed sideways into the deck's edge and the equipment directly next to it. But its more likely that at the altitude this low it wasn't upright anymore, it really came in at that -45

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bguy_1986

Well, it came in a bit low and hard. It's lower section (legs/engines) slammed sideways into the deck's edge and the equipment directly next to it. But its more likely that at the altitude this low it wasn't upright anymore, it really came in at that -45

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DocM

She certainly tried to get down on center.

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FloatingFatMan

So very very close...

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DocM

2 weeks til DSCOVR....

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flyingskippy

The fact that the rocket tried to compensate for the grid fins being out is amazing. This kind of compensating for failure technology hasnt been implemented in aircraft yet.

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DocM

I mentioned it in another thread, but the guy responsible for F9's landing avionics came from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

After he arrived SpaceX he and JPL co-developed NASA's next-generation Mars entry, descent and landing (EDL) software for landers and rovers. It not only does precision landings, but it can autonomously select alternate landing sites on the fly.

Methinks there's a lot of it in F9, and it'll be handy for their Mars Colonial Transport.

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DocM

Yup. The JPL G-FOLD collaboration had a major test in the Masten Xombie VTVL test vehicle in 2013, and I'd bet a lot of those techniques will also be in the Dragon V2 propulsive landing system.

G-FOLD Diversion Test:

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DocM

It was posted by Beittil a page back.

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dliteking

Man how did I miss that? I knew something wasn't right. Thanks.

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SALSN

Man how did I miss that? I knew something wasn't right. Thanks.

Well I missed it as well, so thanks for reposting it :-)

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  • 3 weeks later...
DocM

Tomorrow's going to be a BUSY day.

DSCOVR launch

DSCOVR 1st stage landing attempt

Dragon CRS-5 returns to Earth

NASA Television will provide live coverage of Dragon's departure beginning at 1:45 p.m. EST.

The Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to detach from the Earth-facing side of the station's Harmony module and release through commands sent by ground controllers in mission control at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston operating the Canadarm 2 robotic arm. Mission control will maneuver Dragon into place for its release, which is scheduled for 2:09 p.m.

Dragon will execute three thruster firings to move a safe distance from the space station for its deorbit burn at approximately 7 p.m. The capsule will splash down in the Pacific Ocean around 7:44 p.m. The deorbit burn and the splashdown will not air on NASA TV.

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DocM

CRS-5 departure

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCCjV6fYojM

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DocM

Deorbit burn finished, splashdown 1944 Eastern.

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DocM

SpaceX ?@SpaceX

#Dragon splashdown confirmed!

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DocM

SpaceX's Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean about 7:44 p.m. EST Tuesday 259 miles southwest of Long Beach, California, with nearly 3,700 pounds of NASA cargo, science and first-of-its-kind technology demonstration samples from the International Space Station.

The Dragon spacecraft will be taken by ship to Long Beach, where some cargo will be removed and returned to NASA. Dragon will then be prepared for a return trip to SpaceX's test facility in McGregor, Texas, for processing.

"The ability to resupply and return this critical research continues to be an invaluable asset for the researchers here on Earth using the International Space Station as their laboratory in orbit," said Kirt Costello, deputy chief scientist for the International Space Station Program at NASA

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