.NET for the Mac OS X


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macman87

is it possible to write the .Net framework (or bits or it) for Mac OS X so u can run .NET apps? i have heard that people have done it for linux and i wonder if it possible...

thanks

Phillip

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danbalsh

Not yet, the Linux program called Mono has not yet been ported to PPC.

We are more likly to see a port direct from Microsoft.

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mac15

couldn't it be run under x11?, pardon my total lack of knowledge for this topic.

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snippet1

Yup, for Linux - www.go-mono.com .

Problem is that it's far from finished, so it'll be forever before it would be possible to port it to Mac OS, and as said, it could well be MS to make the Mac port.

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macman87

thanks for the info guys

so i guess people still have to program too versions of the same thing... :(

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snippet1
The execution engine works on various platforms, we support Just-in-Time and Ahead-of-Time compilations on Intel x86 machines (and soon PowerPC).

Well, there you have it!

/edit: Also interesting on Mono's site is that they are looking towards Longhorn - maybe this could see XAML and related implementation on Mac OS?

Edited by snippet1
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arhra
Not yet, the Linux program called Mono has not yet been ported to PPC.

We are more likly to see a port direct from Microsoft.

Actually, Mono compiles and runs fine in both PPC linux, and OS X. The JIT compiler works well enough to run a hello world (i haven't tried anything more complex yet), and the interpreter works perfectly (if somewhat slowly).

The big obstacle to running .net programs on OSes other than windows is the window forms framework, which is pretty tightly tied to win32, and hasn't been implemented to any significant degree by mono. Console apps will generally work fine, though, provided they don't use P/Invoke (calling native code). GUIs are another matter entirely, however (although, frankly, GUIs should be written for a single platform only, since cross-platform gui usually equates to crap, lowest common-denominator gui, which anyone who's had the misfortune to use a java gui will tell you is almost always a bad thing). On linux and windows, the mono folks have written a binding to the gtk+ gui framework, which may eventually be usable on osx (although last time i checked, gtk+ for osx was in a pretty sorry state). One of the guys working on mono for os x has expressed an intent to write a framework providing a binding to the cocoa frameworks, though, which would be incredibly cool (iv'e been fiddling a bit with cocoa, and while it seems to be a nice api, obj-c is... well, objectionable).

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snippet1

But .net has the potential to be untied from all bounds of OS. If only MS would be nice and let us do it more easily... :rolleyes:

/edit:

Question 60: What is a 100% .NET application?

A `100% .NET application' is one that only uses the APIs defined under the System namespace and does not use P/Invoke. These applications would in theory run unmodified on Windows, Linux, HP-UX, Solaris, MacOS X and others.

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danbalsh
Actually, Mono compiles and runs fine in both PPC linux, and OS X. The JIT compiler works well enough to run a hello world (i haven't tried anything more complex yet), and the interpreter works perfectly (if somewhat slowly).

wow! thanks for that :happy: I really should research things before posting... :rofl:

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snippet1
wow! thanks for that :happy: I really should research things before posting... :rofl:

Meh - I'm on a learning curve too...

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aristotle-dude
thanks for the info guys

so i guess people still have to program too versions of the same thing... :(

Yeah well there is this thing called Java. Perhaps you've heard of it? :laugh:

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Southern Patriot

There's also RealBasic. You can (to a degree) write code and compile it for OS X, Windows, and I think Linux (last time I checked, Linux support was still pending).

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danbalsh
There's also RealBasic. You can (to a degree) write code and compile it for OS X, Windows, and I think Linux (last time I checked, Linux support was still pending).

Oh yeah I always forget about that, It's supposed to be really good (I've had some Visual Basic, and it's a lot like that)

I've heard it's only good for some kind of programs, like small applications though, I think there is a demo on the RealBasic site.

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