New Theory Suggests That We Live In The Past Of A Parallel Universe


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  • 5 weeks later...

Everything is up in the air regarding the Origin Theories, perhaps more so now than ever. Science is making some incredible strides in the past decade, and there are many more questions being raised than answered. But that's not to say we're clueless -- far from it.

 

That's the great thing about Science -- the journey is just as important as the destination. Carl Sagan taught us that, if he taught us anything at all. Wisdom is just as important as Knowledge. :yes:

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Want me to explain it, with the Science? It'll be extremely long-winded and based on some hypothesis that haven't been proven yet -- but it IS possible in some frameworks. It'll make for some interesting reading, folks.

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