Falcon 9: SES-9 commsat rides first Enhanced F9 (mission)


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Draggendrop

/s  In this instance, if I were Great White fishing, I'd be saying..."I think we need a bigger boat"     :woot:

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Unobscured Vision

I'm starting to think they need larger Droneships. And they're already big. 

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FloatingFatMan
4 minutes ago, Unobscured Vision said:

I'm starting to think they need larger Droneships. And they're already big. 

I'm starting to think they need to forget the ships and land on LAND...

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anthdci
1 minute ago, FloatingFatMan said:

I'm starting to think they need to forget the ships and land on LAND...

that would be pretty difficult on that trajectory. By the look of it, it didn't have enough fuel to slow down to land in the middle of the sea. Getting back to florida 600km away was completely out of the question. They have the ships so its worth aiming for them rather than abandoning them to the sea without trying.

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DocM
3 minutes ago, FloatingFatMan said:

I'm starting to think they need to forget the ships and land on LAND...

Not possible with FH center cores and F9 low margin launches.

 

Musk says it "landed hard". Better chance next time.

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Jim K

 

 

 

 

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FloatingFatMan
3 minutes ago, anthdci said:

that would be pretty difficult on that trajectory. By the look of it, it didn't have enough fuel to slow down to land in the middle of the sea. Getting back to florida 600km away was completely out of the question. They have the ships so its worth aiming for them rather than abandoning them to the sea without trying.

 

1 minute ago, DocM said:

Not possible with FH center cores and F9 low margin launches.

 

Musk says it "landed hard". Better chance next time.

A guy can hope, right? ;)

 

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Unobscured Vision

I still believe SpaceX is on the right track. This one had the least chance of success, so yeah. They didn't expect it to work.

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anthdci

Simply didn't have enough fuel to slow down enough. Good effort, hit the target by the sounds of it.

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anthdci

how long before we start to get images through? It is nearing 1am UK, so time for me to turn in.

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Unobscured Vision

When you folks in the UK wake up there should be images galore for you. Good night!

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Jim K
9 minutes ago, anthdci said:

that would be pretty difficult on that trajectory. By the look of it, it didn't have enough fuel to slow down to land in the middle of the sea. Getting back to florida 600km away was completely out of the question. They have the ships so its worth aiming for them rather than abandoning them to the sea without trying.

Yep, they've done phenomenal work ... landing one on land and very close on the other barge attempts.  Soooo close.  Just to think that the stage 1 was booking at around 8300km/h and over 70km in altitude when it started to make its descent and still came close ... mind blowing.

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Draggendrop

A few years from now, when landing S1 is a standard routine, we'll be saying..."remember those crazy pioneering days !"  :D

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Draggendrop

Replays....

 

SES-9 Technical Webcast, video is 54:14 min.

 

 

 

 

 

SES-9 Full Webcast, video is 54:27 min.

 

 

 

:D

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Draggendrop

TV broadcasting satellite finally launched on Falcon 9

 

25486857196_b7090b4cb1_z.jpg

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket blasted off at 6:35 p.m. EST (2335 GMT) Friday. Credit: SpaceX

 

Quote

Powering off the planet just after sunset Friday, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket took off from Cape Canaveral with the multi-mission SES 9 communications satellite to link millions of homes, businesses, ships and airplanes across the Asia-Pacific.

 

The commercial telecom station, to be positioned nearly 22,300 miles (about 36,000 kilometers) over the equator, weathered four previous launch attempts since Feb. 24, grounded by problems with the Falcon 9’s super-chilled liquid oxygen propellant, a boat that strayed into offshore waters, and pesky upper level winds.

 

A rush of steam and orange-hot rocket exhaust from the Falcon 9’s nine Merlin 1D main engines signaled the start of a 31-minute trip into orbit at 6:35 p.m. EST (2335 GMT). Moments later, the slender white launcher climbed away from Cape Canaveral, arcing toward the east over the Atlantic Ocean as vibrating sound waves reached spectators stationed several miles away.

 

Riding 1.5 million pounds of thrust, the kerosene-fueled rocket surpassed the speed of sound about one minute into the flight, and the Falcon 9’s engine plume grew fainter the farther the launcher flew downrange, only to be illuminated again as it climbed into sunlight.

 

Less than three minutes after liftoff, the nine-engine first stage turned off and dropped away, leaving the Falcon 9’s second stage engine to finish the job of placing the SES 9 telecom satellite into orbit.

 

The Falcon 9’s nose fairing split open and jettisoned a minute later, and the second stage fired until the flight’s nine-minute point, before coasting and then restarting over Africa to drive SES 9 into geostationary transfer orbit.

 

The rocket deployed SES 9 about 31 minutes after liftoff as it flew hundreds of miles over the border between Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

 

Quote

Ground controllers received the first signals from the newly-launched spacecraft late Friday night, confirming its health after launch, according to Boeing, the satellite’s manufacturer.

 

IMG_2490.jpg

The SES 9 satellite deploys from the Falcon 9 rocket’s upper stage in this view from an on-board “rocketcam.” Credit: SpaceX

 

Quote

The high speed required to put the SES 9 satellite into its high-energy orbit left little margin for the recovery attempt, which uses leftover propellant in the first stage to relight its engines to steer toward landing.

 

“Rocket landed hard on the droneship,” Musk tweeted. “Didn’t expect this one to work (v hot reentry), but next flight has a good chance.”

 

The next Falcon 9 flight is scheduled for no earlier than March 29 at approximately 8:38 p.m. EDT (0038 GMT on March 30) with a Dragon supply ship bound for the International Space Station.

 

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The Falcon 9 rocket streaked into space just after sunset Friday. Credit: SpaceX

 

more at the link...

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/03/05/tv-broadcasting-satellite-finally-launched-on-falcon-9/

 

and

 

SpaceX launches SES-9 satellite

http://spacenews.com/spacex-launches-ses-9-satellite/

 

//  As a side note, spaceflightnow.com servers also crashed during the launch due to access overload.

 

:D

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DocM
9 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

Dammit, can't get this %$#6\#$ stupid editor to delete this unasked for  quote box or type outside of it :angry:

 

Anyhow....

 

SES-9 SUCCESSFULLY LAUNCHED ON SPACEX’S FALCON 9 


LUXEMBOURG/CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA, 4 March 2016 -- SES S.A. (NYSE Euronext Paris and Luxembourg Stock Exchange: SESG) announced today that its SES-9 satellite was successfully launched into space on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. SES-9 roared into space at 6:35 pm East Coast Time (00:35 am on 5 March Central European Time) and separated from the second stage of the SpaceX rocket 31 minutes later.

SES-9 uses a chemical bi-propellant thruster to conduct major post-launch manoeuvers, completing its journey to its orbit at 36,000 kilometers above the Equator with an electric propulsion system. The on-orbit maneuvering throughout the 15 year nominal lifetime of the satellite will be done entirely by electric propulsion. SES-9 is planned to commence its services in the third quarter of this year.

SES-9 is SES’s largest satellite to serve the Asia-Pacific region. It weighed 5.3 tonnes at the launch and has 57 high-power Ku-band transponders – equivalent to 81x36 MHz transponders’ It thus provides significant expansion capacity to serve the buoyant and fast-growing video, enterprise, mobility and government sectors across Northeast Asia, South Asia, India, Indonesia and the Philippines. SES-9 will be co-located with another SES satellite, SES-7, at the prime orbital location of 108.2 degrees East, and will replace the NSS-11 spacecraft at that position. SES-9 was built by Boeing Satellite Systems International.

“SES-9 is an important building block in our strategy to grow in dynamic regions and four prime sectors -- video, enterprise, mobility and government,” said Martin Halliwell, Chief Technology Officer of SES. 

 

“Co-located with SES-7, the new satellite will reach 22 million TV homes and is designed to deliver high-performing connectivity to homes, enterprises and institutions across Asia. 

 

With its dedicated mobility beams, it will help us to capture new opportunities in the buoyant markets for maritime and aeronautical connectivity. 

 

The successful launch of SES-9 also takes us an important step further in our excellent relationship with SpaceX as a launch provider of growing importance, and is further proof of SpaceX’s professionalism and impressive performance. I congratulate the SpaceX and SES teams, who together have done an excellent job.”

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PaulRocket

I wonder if something went even more wrong then we thought with the landing.  We got confirmation of failed landing attempt 1h 15 min after launch and we still don't have any pics or video. 

On the other hand the barge is really far out and it might take them some time.

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PaulRocket

I am getting info that the ASDS is broken. Unconfirmed but by a reliable source...

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anthdci

still no word on what happened other than it came in hard?

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DocM

Odds are it hit the side extension wing. It'll be back in port in about 3 days.

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bguy_1986

I was wondering about that.  Was hoping that they could or would divert S1 if they knew it was going to come in hot so it wouldn't destroy ASDS.

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DocM

R land The normal landing trajectory for both KSC and ASDS is ballistic, taking it into the water. To land it does a translation "divert" over the ship (or land) only after the landing engine starts.

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Unobscured Vision

I'd really like to see them employ a drogue chute system to slow the S1 down so that fuel levels aren't such a concern like they were this time around -- or at least keep a drogue system an option if needed to help deal with ballistic reentries like these.


Yes, chutes are "old school", but sometimes "old school" is what's needed. Plus drogues aren't that heavy, and can be cut loose when not needed anymore.

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Draggendrop

IMHO, it is a bit of a dilemna. This launch was an extreme, and would probably be lifted with FH in the future. The S1 on return, uses itself as a "lifting body" which is "partially steered" by it's grid fins, and does a good job at that. When F9FT, in the near term, is used for the slightly less massive payloads and reduced entry velocities, I think all will be well. The FHFT as the heavy hauler, can take over the big payloads and have reusability. I have a lot of confidence in their strategy, it's just this "learning and adapting phase" we have now, which will be on to better things shortly. Exciting times with lot's of drama, and in the future, we may miss the RUD's a little.....:D

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DocM
2 hours ago, Unobscured Vision said:

I'd really like to see them employ a drogue chute system to slow the S1 down so that fuel levels aren't such a concern like they were this time around -- or at least keep a drogue system an option if needed to help deal with ballistic reentries like these.


Yes, chutes are "old school", but sometimes "old school" is what's needed. Plus drogues aren't that heavy, and can be cut loose when not needed anymore.

They tried chutes with Falcon 1 and Falcon9 v1.0 and they were a total failure. Chutes shred at these speeds, and every kilogram of dry mass at liftoff costs many times that much in terms of payload mass.  

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