Project Morpheus 4 Hour Event at GDC


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Sony has announced that it will be hosting a nearly four-hour event focusing on its PlayStation 4-based virtual reality headset Project Morpheus on Tuesday, March 3, during the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

 

 

More @ http://www.polygon.com/2015/2/19/8072173/project-morpheus-virtual-reality

 

This is why Japan will get on board  :shiftyninja:

 

 

K
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Sorry but am I seeing this right?

 

A massive multinational like Sony allow their product demo's to be driven by the Japanese obsession on borderline pedophilia?

 

A Japanese demo shown at a Japanese event for a title that'll probably never be localised. You gotta appeal to the culture over there somehow! Not really different than the abundance of JRPGs on the market just now, some even localised, with the same themes.

 

Last I heard Occulus actually has VR porn up and running!

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A Japanese demo shown at a Japanese event for a title that'll probably never be localised. You gotta appeal to the culture over there somehow! Not really different than the abundance of JRPGs on the market just now, some even localised, with the same themes.

 

Last I heard Occulus actually has VR porn up and running!

Occulus or a third party?

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Occulus or a third party?

 

3rd party obviously, but so is the Tekken Team who make the game above. It's not Sony 1st party either.

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Key changes: OLED display at 1920 x RGB x 1080
 
PS4 was designed to have a 120 fps output, which we haven't talked about publicly in the past(!)
 
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Release date: Morpheus will launch in the first half of 2016(!)

 

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Only $400!

 

(I made that up).

 

From C|NET

Sony has come a long way in addressing how Morpheus is worn and what it feels like. Besides the new prototype's slide-able display, the device also reorients the headset's strap to hug the sides of your head, rather than awkwardly running a piece of velcro down the middle of your scalp. The result, from my hands-on experience Tuesday, was easily the most comfortable VR experience to date, with Oculus' Crescent Bay prototype a close second.

 

In terms of the VR image quality and feelings of motion, Morpheus feels the closest to being able to sustain a longer-term gaming experience thanks to its upgraded innards, though it's far from perfect. I played "The Heist," a short demo produced by Sony's London studio, that positioned me at the mercy of a thuggish character preparing to torture information out of me. When my captor moved in close to my face and shouted, I was simultaneously amused by how real it seemed and startled by the tinge of fear I felt.

 

What followed was a flashback sequence with a pulse-pounding gunfight, the first I've experienced in VR and a veritable hair-raiser capable of converting the biggest of VR skeptics. (I died spectacularly, with gun shots coming from an unknown location until splotches of red filled the screen.) Beyond the look and feel of "The Heist," the demo is also where Sony's real competitive advantage shined through: the PlayStation Move controllers.

 

Unlike Oculus, Sony has its own motion-control remotes, which resemble glowing microphones, that introduce sharp and reliable hand motions to the VR gameplay. I was able to rifle through drawers, pick up a firearm with one hand, load it with ammo with the other and begin fending off armed guards through tactical crouching and peeking out from cover.

 

The hand motion-control element of Morpheus is bound to be a strong selling point for Morpheus, despite its restriction to the PlayStation platform. While Oculus has long invited other companies and developers to use its hardware and develop their own applications, Sony is restricting Morpheus to its console, giving it more control over its VR platform, but putting more responsibility in the company's hands to ensure there's games to play when Morpheus arrives.

 

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I was really hoping it would make it by Christmas this year...

I'm still hoping it will be $200 or less.  By Christmas I expect the PS4 to be around $300 (with holiday sales, not necessarily permanently) so I can't imagine people paying more than the console for an accessory... even if a cool one.  Plus I think it will be amusing if Morpheus + PS4 = $499... the Xbox One + Kinect launch price.

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Seems like this going to fail pretty hard.  Developers are having hard enough time with 1080p 60 fps.  Know they want to push 120 fps.  I really don't think this will be big deal.  

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Seems like this going to fail pretty hard.  Developers are having hard enough time with 1080p 60 fps.  Know they want to push 120 fps.  I really don't think this will be big deal.  

 

It's just a matter of toning down the graphical fidelity. Besides, the 120fps will probably be created by some interlacing or something like that.

 

I'm still not sold on VR in general, but a lot can happen in 1

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This sounds pretty cool, let's hope that Sony don't make the same mistake as MS and support it properly. First impressions look solid. 

 

I wonder if you can only use the headset with specific games or any game can be patched or tweaked to work with the headset. 

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Seems like this going to fail pretty hard. Developers are having hard enough time with 1080p 60 fps. Know they want to push 120 fps. I really don't think this will be big deal.

Graphical fidelity doesn't have to be the same. There are demos at GDC running at that framerate. Most impressions from hands on are really positive, what makes you think it will fail pretty hard?

 

As for a comparison with other current prototypes

 

DK2 is 75hz
 
Crescent Bay is 90hz
 
As these are powered by PC's they'll easily do 120hz, most likely more, but it's showing Sony are putting an effort into their set.

 

OLED display
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Graphical fidelity doesn't have to be the same. There are demos at GDC running at that framerate. Most impressions from hands on are really positive, what makes you think it will fail pretty hard?

 

 

I know it wasn't directed at me, but it all depends on the price. 50-100$? Sure! 299-399$? No way. Also, highly dependant on the games.

 

But if Sony plays their cards right, they might have the next "Wii Sports" on their hands.

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I know it wasn't directed at me, but it all depends on the price. 50-100$? Sure! 299-399$? No way. Also, highly dependant on the games.

 

But if Sony plays their cards right, they might have the next "Wii Sports" on their hands.

 

I have a feeling price is one reason it's not coming till 2016. Zuckerberg is going to make VR affordable for the masses (and most likely heavily ad supported!). If the price of the PS4 can come down by 2016, launching a bundle with VR at $599 will be the same price MS launched the One at with Kinect. The bundle would also have to include the camera and motion controllers.

 

Standalone I have a feeling it will be $199, or even $249. Expensive, but if a craze surrounds VR people will buy it in the same way they buy $700 mobiles. Of course one could ask why people will buy Sony's instead of the Facebook supported Occulus. It will be far more popular, but gamers invested in the PS brand will be hoping for a better-supported game experience from the likes of Sony. We'll see...

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I have a feeling price is one reason it's not coming till 2016. Zuckerberg is going to make VR affordable for the masses (and most likely heavily ad supported!). If the price of the PS4 can come down by 2016, launching a bundle with VR at $599 will be the same price MS launched the One at with Kinect. The bundle would also have to include the camera and motion controllers.

 

Standalone I have a feeling it will be $199, or even $249. Expensive, but if a craze surrounds VR people will buy it in the same way they buy $700 mobiles. Of course one could ask why people will buy Sony's instead of the Facebook supported Occulus. It will be far more popular, but gamers invested in the PS brand will be hoping for a better-supported game experience from the likes of Sony. We'll see...

 

Most mobiles are subsidized by carries. Not many people pay the full price of a mobile up front.

 

Kinect launched at $149 (if memory serves) and was hugely popular. But I have a feeling it was easier selling that than a pair of huge classes. When people can't even be bothered to wear 3D-glasses at home, I'm not sure VR-glasses (and HoloLens for that matter) have any chance of a break-through.

 

Unless the price is low enough.

 

Which VR-set to choose is of course dependant on the support, but if I had a PS4 I'd choose Sonys offering, hands down.

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I'm still amused that people think VR is going to be popular. My guess is that at best it goes the same way as kinect - many buy it and then stop using it after a month.

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I'm still amused that people think VR is going to be popular. My guess is that at best it goes the same way as kinect - many buy it and then stop using it after a month.

 

This should be a post to revisit in a few years ;)

 

If you don't think Zuckerberg and Facebook will make it popular then I think you underestimate what is to come. VR is far more advanced and mature than Kinect. What can be seen and done with games is much more interesting than waving your arms about. It's a visual experience more than a physical.

 

Digital Foundrys opinion

 

We only played the one demo - London Studio's Heist - and it allowed us to sample what is going to be a crucial element of the Morpheus SDK. The demo itself is visually rich, apparently running at 60fps, but the PS4 uses a form of frame-rate upscaling that Sony calls reprojection in order to give the illusion of a higher frame-rate. The idea is that midway between rendering each native image, the PS4 interpolates an intermediate frame based on revised motion data fed to the console from the HMD. Right now we'd say that the jury's out on the technology - it didn't exactly feel as though it was running at a significantly higher frame-rate and indeed, at some points it felt that the 60fps target wasn't adhered to. However, even if we're not quite dealing with super-slick perfection, the quality of the immersion is absolutely remarkable. This is VR that not only works but leaves a lasting impression. An hour on from the hands-on session and I'm still excited about it.

 

 

The demo is short and sweet but does enough to demonstrate that PlayStation 4 has the power to create a visually detailed experience while maintaining a coherent stereoscopic image at a sufficiently high frame-rate. It feels as if it has the quality to work as a full game, though beyond the confines of the demo you do have to wonder whether it would work as anything other than an on-rails experience.

 

 

 
It also serves to remind us that while Sony has - quite rightly - aimed for high frame-rates and fast response, we are still dealing with a 1080p image, which remains just as soft as it did on the prototype. The right trades have been made though. The lack of clarity doesn't detract from the quality of the overall experience, and obvious image quality artefacts - like edge-aliasing for example - are relatively slight. We spotted some minor jaggies on the shoulders of our captor, but that was it.

 

 

Secondly, the Heist demo emphasises the importance of PlayStation Move as an intuitive way to interact with the game world. While we didn't have access to the other three demos Sony has brought to GDC (we'll be looking at those later in the week), our prior experience of Morpheus demos using a standard Dual Shock 4 pad just isn't in the same league. What's really impressive about the London Heist demo is that interaction with the game world is intuitive - and obvious. There are no visual cues about where to find the gun, or how to load it - doing so is simply second nature. In the process, it feels fresh and exciting.
 
What we have here is a carefully crafted experience with full console-level production values, working in combination with highly impressive hardware. Sony has brought three more demos to GDC that we'll be sampling later in the week - including a full 120fps experience

 

 

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-2015-hands-on-with-the-near-final-project-morpheus

 

And ARS

 

One year later, Sony
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This should be a post to revisit in a few years ;)

 

If you don't think Zuckerberg and Facebook will make it popular then I think you underestimate what is to come. VR is far more advanced and mature than Kinect. What can be seen and done with games is much more interesting than waving your arms about. It's a visual experience more than a physical.

 

Considering what was said about the Kinect back in the days, I'd advise people to be sceptic. Also from Eurogamer/DF:

 

 

If you're prepared to put up with its compromises, you'll have a genuinely exciting piece of new technology with tremendous wow factor and a number of impressive party tricks.

 

it's not quite as capable as you imagined, but it is inescapably, totally new. And there's no question that non-gamers will be blown away by it

 

The sci-fi frisson of new technology it provides is something we haven't experienced in the last five years, and if you're that way inclined, it's worth the

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Considering what was said about the Kinect back in the days, I'd advise people to be sceptic. Also from Eurogamer/DF:

 

 

As we all know, Kinect is more or less dead. It was highly hyped (and sold very well), but crashed and burned.

 

I fear it's the same for VR, no matter how impressive the demos might be.

 

Edit:

 

Is it just me, or does it seem that the Ars Technica guy is more impressed with Playstation Move?? All of the quoted part is focused on how you can interact by using your hands... which is what Move is for..

 

Move coupled with VR, not move on it's own. 

 

These are real life experiences though, a lot of Kinect was smoke and mirrors which didn't live up to expectations

 

 

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