The question of life and gods answered


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Ph1b3r0pt1c

My take on it is this: we know for a fact that on planet earth what goes up will come down unless it can generate enough thrust to break our chain of gravity. As far as black holes are concerned, the 'theory' begind them is they are stars that went supernova, then collopsed into itself creating an object with gravity so strong light cannot escape it. Scientists can only notice these objects due to the way light bends around one of them when viewed through a telescope. What always got me is how big everything is. Our little speck of dirt is just in one ARM of the milky way galaxy, and thus far we have not even been able to get out of this one arm due to the size. Do i personally believe one 'entity' made all of this? No, i dont. For that to have happened the creator would have to have been created, right? As far as i have seen with my own two eyes you cannot have something from nothing, hence we will NEVER know where we came from or where we are going.

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NJ Louch
Its been said numerous times that the laws of physics do break down with black holes or they cease to work right.

 

Not by anyone who knows what they are talking about.

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ThisSiteHasLostItsCharm

if we are the only ones here on earth, then what's the point of all that space out there?

 

can't be there just so we can explore it right? gotta be other life out there...hard to believe earth is the only planet with life out of all the probable billions of planets out there.

 

 

or is space just a hologram?

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bonalste

if we are the only ones here on earth, then what's the point of all that space out there?

Why do people always insist that there has to be some sort of point or meaning? Isn't it enough that we are here? Asking about the meaning of life is like asking about the speed of spaghetti. Itndoesnt make sense. We have a biological function, which is to pass on our genes, which to anybody who understands basics of biology is absolutely amazing. Why do you need some sort of higher reason to exist? Why does the reason have to be philosophical or cerebral rather than simply biological?

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Arachno 1D

They insist in a "point or meaning" because it infers there is some grand design ergo there is some thought behind the process.It somehow seems to ease their minds that we are not a random act of evolution but a design process of some entity beyond our limit comprehension.

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Anibal P

Why do people always insist that there has to be some sort of point or meaning? Isn't it enough that we are here? Asking about the meaning of life is like asking about the speed of spaghetti. Itndoesnt make sense. We have a biological function, which is to pass on our genes, which to anybody who understands basics of biology is absolutely amazing. Why do you need some sort of higher reason to exist? Why does the reason have to be philosophical or cerebral rather than simply biological?

 

Because the thought that all life on Earth is a fluke and an accident doesn't sit well for some. It's better to question and gain knowledge than to live in ignorance, hence all the advances we have made as a species, but some take everything to extremes in either direction 

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Noir Angel

Do you dare to adopt an open-mind view or are you willing to hold dear to your ignorance and dissolve this subject as hoax and move on?  What type of person are you will be based on what you do with this information.  Here is the full transcript interview.  Decide for yourself.  Regurgitate and post your thoughts.

 

 

Open mindedness is basically defined as being prepared to accept new ideas and question one's own assumptions about the world when presented with evidence that may conflict with what we think.

 

It doesn't mean that you're obliged to be contemptuous of anything representing cohesive thought, nor does it mean that you should accept conspiracy theories when the evidence for them is pretty spotty (and that's a pretty charitable assessment of the evidence for the roswell "aliens")

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Arachno 1D

Many seem to talk about the concept of "open mindedness" yet block out any reasonable explanation because the obscure always has a greater pull on their imagination.Maybe is because of a lack of trust in the believability that life is actually totally random and not predefined i.e. Gods or tied to a controlled external  source i.e.Aliens.The concept that we may actually be one of many if somewhat distinct and at a different evolutionary status of other "life" forms within the galaxy seems beyond many to conceive as truth.

Its very much like early explorers traveling the Congo where ancient tribes believed in sacrificing to the Gods and calling them savages.Each is a human being living at a predefined time frame and geographical location but both hold a completely different and foriegn concept of reality based on their surroundings and upbringings.

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compl3x

Open mindedness is basically defined as being prepared to accept new ideas and question one's own assumptions about the world when presented with evidence that may conflict with what we think.

 

It doesn't mean that you're obliged to be contemptuous of anything representing cohesive thought, nor does it mean that you should accept conspiracy theories when the evidence for them is pretty spotty (and that's a pretty charitable assessment of the evidence for the roswell "aliens")

 

 

Yes. Being open minded should be associated more with free thought and skepticism movements, not snake oil salesmen or New Age woo advocate. Accepting all new ideas uncritically is not open minded, it is being credulous and that is nothing to be proud of.

 

 

If someone argues their house is haunted and I suggest that given the lack of evidence for ghosts a more rational answer is more likely and that person then dismisses my argument and insists that their house is haunted, who is being closed minded? 

 

I use this example because I knew someone who insisted her house was haunted because at night there would be loud thuds and rattling sounds. To make a long story short, she lived in a particularly cold part of the state and at night she'd shower before bed which caused the pipes to the shower to heat up and then rapidly cool under the cold house which made the noises. She insisted the house was haunted, she was "closed minded" to alternative views. It doesn't make her dumb or a bad person, she just didn't think critically.

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