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Eighth-Grader Arrested, Charged With Cybercrimes for Changing Teacher

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ramesees    348

It didn't need fixing.  That he'd done that was a given.

 

Well then you shouldnt mind it being explicitly stated.

 

To read your version as it was written leaves out the charge he is facing.

 

Context is key after all.

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Oaxytl-lemon    1

You people are awesome. Another kid does something that all kids do, they act up and now he is never going to get hired at anything other than being some cops lunch and promotion for meeting the quota. The rule of law is at the point of a gun. If you have to force people then you have failed as a society and your laws mean nothing. 30 years ago it was not a crime, but lawyers are sanctioned theives. There is no difference from one side to the other, only the people make the difference. If it where me I would make sure the kids record got accidentally on purpose erased and some community service at an retirement home.

The idea that a clock can tick one second "tick" and tock the next "tock" and now your an adult is the most absurd and ridicoulus thing I have ever witnessed from a society.

And btw, I can fly to Nmsterdamn float a boat full of hallucinogenic plants down the river without a tag and title and fish all day without some ahole counting my catch and I am 100% legal. Do I care, no... Laws are written by rich, priveledged, aholes that only care about their own egos and how much damage they can get away with.

 

Laws are explicitly written for the protection of a few wealthy interests. As a true peace keeper keeps the peace, but tells the lawyers to shove the books up their aholes when they start demanding corporate code enforcement at the expense of your own morality, if you have any that is.

 

Law also is inconsistent. You can go to jail for 10 years for blowing bubble gum in some countries and to think that money and indifference had nothing to do with that law you would have to be a complete moron from your planet Uranus.

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tompkin    153

how times have changed, these days criminals are more violent / on drugs etc... taking back things they steal is hardly something they are going to lose sleep over and then its onto the next victim.

I don't really think that human nature has changed. But as drugs have proliferated in society there are more opportunities to become exposed to them earlier. Again, unwise decisions of youth would cause some to try these things. Had my friend and I been using drugs, the jewelry might have entered our minds. Thus, a cascading effect of one unwise decision leading to another.

 

Careful thought needs to be done, though, whether to get the law involved in an issue because of the effect that it could have on the youngster. Even, without the law, having an incident like this on Facebook would mean that it will never really leave him. But bringing the law in means charges were filed. That's a whole different ball game. 

 

I know people who committed offenses of similar severity as this 13 year old that eventually became doctors and architects. To me, the decision to bring the law into the matter was an even GREATER unwise decision than the 13 year old's because what he did caused no lasting harm but what they did could effect his life forever.

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Emn1ty    4,364

but having illegally gained access is my big stink overall.

 

What happened to the punishment being proportional to the crime? I don't remember people being put behind bars for what they might have done. But what they did do or what is shown was clearly the goal. He should be in trouble for breaking into the computer, but whether or not sensitive data could have been accessed is irrelevant. The kid wasn't trying to get sensitive data, instead he was trying to pull a prank.

 

If someone copied my key in order to gain access to my home in an effort to prank me, I'd not call the police because they 'could have stolen something'. If they didn't steal anything they didn't steal anything. If the cops took it seriously, yeah he'd get breaking and entering but he'd not get anything else.

 

When I was in highschool, the school's security was atrocious. They had blocked anything with a flash game in it while leaving things like anarchist's cookbook unblocked. Pornography sites were open access, etc. People constantly brought in flash drives with CounterStrike installed on them to play (my school was a Lutheran school, so that doesn't go over well) and a plethora of other games to bypass the security measures in place by the staff there. None of them were criminally charged, all of them disciplined internally. Hell... student passwords were our SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS for a time, how idiotic is that?

 

This is a matter of a kid taking advantage of poor planning and security on the school's part. If it weren't this, he'd probably have found another way to prank the teacher.

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JoeC    107

I did worse than this at secondary school in the UK about 8 years ago, and all that happened was that I got shouted at a bit by the IT tech.

 

Sure you can say "well he committed a crime, he needs to be punished" and that's technically true, but it's more than a little bit OTT. The police don't need to be involved for a school issue where the kid should just be given detention for a few days and have his computer rights restricted for a little while.

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DocM    16,889

(Puts on husband of a teacher hat)

Many risk averse teachers and administrators no longer want to take responsibility for anything but minor punishments (and dealing with the parents after), so they offload discipline to the local police department.

In many of our K-12 schools there's already a city officer in the building as security, a conflict resolution counselor and generally an adult the kids can talk to about whatever, but if the administration files a complaint they'll intervene.

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Intersect    239

Back in the day, this would have been handled with a suspension and a letter to the parents... Why do the cops need to be involved? That just ends up wrecking the rest of the kids life, all for a really dumb mistake.

 

I bet the headmaster made a ton of dumb mistakes when HE was a kid...

 

The kid did wrong and needs punishment, but a criminal conviction is going too far...

maby this is what kids need these days, it might make them respect others more, like kids used to in the old days putting them into national service would help teach respect.

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FloatingFatMan    21,009

maby this is what kids need these days, it might make them respect others more, like kids used to in the old days putting them into national service would help teach respect.

 

That only worked because kids were brought up to respect their elders. Try that these days, and all you'll get is a bunch of thugs mouthing off to the sergeant and then thrown out of the service.

 

The problem begins and ends at parenting, and the limits placed on us on how we can discipline poor behaviour.

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neufuse    4,414

Guys, this story is a little more deep then just changing a wallpaper... the kid tried to put porn on the teachers desktop... that for one would of probably got the teacher fired, and maybe even worse if somehow it was displayed to more then just the teacher.. aka on a projector to the class if they started the system up and logged in with it running and that being there...

 

this kid did a bit more then just steal a password and change a wallpaper... he almost cause a big incident that could of got the teacher fired if he had succeeded and the teacher couldn't explain how it got there...

 

on top of that, he's a multi time offender... he did this more then once, the first times they went light on him

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DocM    16,889

Given the above and it's possible consequences, he's graduated from mischievous twerp to malicious a-hole. Drop the hammer.

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tompkin    153

One point worth noting. I admit I haven't read the article. The topic title says that he was charged with a "cybercrime". I'm not sure that is the right charge. He basically stole a password and accessed a local hard drive, if I understand it.

 

The password was probably controlled by some kind of group policy at the school. How is that a "cybercrime"?

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neufuse    4,414

One point worth noting. I admit I haven't read the article. The topic title says that he was charged with a "cybercrime". I'm not sure that is the right charge. He basically stole a password and accessed a local hard drive, if I understand it.

 

The password was probably controlled by some kind of group policy at the school. How is that a "cybercrime"?

we've come to classify anything that deals with a network as a "cyber crime" anymore... LAN or WAN

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FloatingFatMan    21,009

Guys, this story is a little more deep then just changing a wallpaper... the kid tried to put porn on the teachers desktop... that for one would of probably got the teacher fired, and maybe even worse if somehow it was displayed to more then just the teacher.. aka on a projector to the class if they started the system up and logged in with it running and that being there...

 

this kid did a bit more then just steal a password and change a wallpaper... he almost cause a big incident that could of got the teacher fired if he had succeeded and the teacher couldn't explain how it got there...

 

on top of that, he's a multi time offender... he did this more then once, the first times they went light on him

 

No he did not. He tried to put a picture of 2 men kissing on it. That's no more porn than a picture of a butterfly is.

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exotoxic    700

No he did not. He tried to put a picture of 2 men kissing on it. That's no more porn than a picture of a butterfly is.

 

The updated article says otherwise...

 

Once inside the network, Green remotely accessed his friends' computer screens and played with the onboard cameras. He got himself in trouble when he tried to place a pornographic image onto a teacher's desktop, then, after being blocked by the school's firewall, settled on one depicting two men kissing. The teacher told school administrators.

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DocM    16,889

No he did not. He tried to put a picture of 2 men kissing on it. That's no more porn than a picture of a butterfly is.

In the UK such an image violates the Advertising Standards Authority content rule for kids TV,

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2008/jun/24/asa.advertising

If it's inappropriate for kids TV it's inappropriate in a school.

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FloatingFatMan    21,009

In the UK such an image violates the Advertising Standards Authority content rule for kids TV,

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2008/jun/24/asa.advertising

If it's inappropriate for kids TV it's inappropriate in a school.

 

I said nothing about it's appropriateness, just that it's not porn.

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DocM    16,889

Porn or not, its grounds for discipline and he's a multiple offender.

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neufuse    4,414

the article says he TRIED to put porn on it

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FloatingFatMan    21,009

the article says he TRIED to put porn on it

 

Do they have proof of that?  From what I read, all he actually did was putting a pic of 2 guys kissing.  Juvenile? Sure. Pornography? Nope.

 

There's a world of difference between what someone wanted to do, and actually did.  Either way, and even if he's a multiple "offender", involving the cops is OTT.  Better to just throw him out of the school permanently if he's done it before.

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T3X4S    4,533

And how exactly does it make speeding legal?  Oh wait, it doesn't...

Speeding is illegal, yes.  What this kid did is illegal.  But a felony is too harsh...as it is for basic speeding.

In the US the punishment must fit the crime - this case - it doesnt.

Just like we dont give someone lethal injection for speeding...well in Texas - but not anywhere else.

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neufuse    4,414

Do they have proof of that?  From what I read, all he actually did was putting a pic of 2 guys kissing.  Juvenile? Sure. Pornography? Nope.

 

There's a world of difference between what someone wanted to do, and actually did.  Either way, and even if he's a multiple "offender", involving the cops is OTT.  Better to just throw him out of the school permanently if he's done it before.

If you actually read the new article, it says he tried to visit pornographic sites and was blocked, after that he went with the other picture... even just visiting the sites could get a teacher fired

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Bryan R.    1,148

His actions were beyond atrocious. Unredeemable. Florida School for Boys is the only option.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s

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Arachno 1D    7,992

One can quote laws all day but the amount of damage and/or harm done to others is relevant to even a murder case.In this case there was neither physical or mental harm to any person and the damage to the system was minimal and easily revokable so an appropriate response would be on the lower end of the scale.

 

Its not unusual as has been stated already for school systems to be compromised by pupils ergo the school should have already had a battle plan to deal with such situations.They should have already made it clear to pupils that such actions would lead to A,B or C and shame on them if they did not.Curiosity is how humans innovate and evolve it is a natural by product of our genes.

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neufuse    4,414

One can quote laws all day but the amount of damage and/or harm done to others is relevant to even a murder case.In this case there was neither physical or mental harm to any person and the damage to the system was minimal and easily revokable so an appropriate response would be on the lower end of the scale.

 

Its not unusual as has been stated already for school systems to be compromised by pupils ergo the school should have already had a battle plan to deal with such situations.They should have already made it clear to pupils that such actions would lead to A,B or C and shame on them if they did not.Curiosity is how humans innovate and evolve it is a natural by product of our genes.

yet there was intent for damage to be done, he intended to get the teacher in trouble, which could of led to the teacher being fired and barred from teaching due to the nature of what happened... if he did put porn on there, and the teacher was caught with it and downloading it under the teachers account, they would be fired and potentially stripped of their license to teach... so this "prank" could of ruined someone's life if he had not been the one caught doing it

 

and if you don't believe that can be the consequence of this, in Pennsylvania this HAS happened and teachers have been barred from teaching because they couldn't prove it wasn't them... in PA we have 4 different background checks now, State, Federal, Police and interagency (aka every school you ever worked for has to report to a new potential employer what happened while you where there, and this would prevent you from getting a new job)

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Arachno 1D    7,992

 

On April 9th, Tampa Bay Times interviewed Green at his home, who stated that accessing and pulling pranks on the faculty

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