Meet the browser: Microsoft Edge Next


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indospot

Edge has been working very well for me. I have enabled everything in the experimental flags, and the only issue I have is with Google websites, which are retarded.

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BooBerry

Edge has been working very well for me. I have enabled everything in the experimental flags, and the only issue I have is with Google websites, which are retarded.

 

 

blink/webkit prefix issues?

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indospot

I don't really know. If I open my G+ notifications on youtube, it doesn't work. Adding links to posts in Blogger is very wonky. And so on.

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FiB3R

Snappy topic title :laugh:

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BooBerry

Snappy topic title :laugh:

 

 

For a snappy browser(compared to ie11) :D

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Anibal P

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 

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BooBerry

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 

 

It's just a Alpha version now.

Still casual browsing works good.

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+Zagadka

Importing bookmarks as a possible future update... that is pretty unacceptable.

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+LostCat

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 

 

I don't know how to download Edge from Edge, so I guess I'll let the OS update it instead :D 

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George P

They're moving fast with Edge, and they've already added quite a lot of stuff to it.  Performance should be top notch if you look at the early benchmarks so far, so I don't worry about that.

 

As far as features go, this new browser team is serious IMO, so don't expect RTM in the summer and then nothing for 8 months or a year like with IE,  I'm betting we'll see at least one new version a month, and at the most once a week post RTM.

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T3X4S

OK - so what does this mean for the non-benchmark running people ?

In real world situations ?

I dont care about some synthetic test that tells me the differences are huge in milliseconds

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George P

OK - so what does this mean for the non-benchmark running people ?

In real world situations ?

I dont care about some synthetic test that tells me the differences are huge in milliseconds

 

You'd have to use it and visit the sites you always do to find out.  Benchmarks will tell you that performance shouldn't be an issue for you or others.

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T3X4S

OK - that is a good answer.  If it benches fast, whether in comparison to other browsers, or against targeted data schemas - then if one does have a performance issue, its a safe bet the problem lies elsewhere than with the browser - never thought of it like that - thx George P.

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MrPringles

You'd have to use it and visit the sites you always do to find out.  Benchmarks will tell you that performance shouldn't be an issue for you or others.

 

 

As an TP build it's quite stable & fast.

Works great for casual browsing.

 

OK - that is a good answer.  If it benches fast, whether in comparison to other browsers, or against targeted data schemas - then if one does have a performance issue, its a safe bet the problem lies elsewhere than with the browser - never thought of it like that - thx George P.

 

Even heavy sites work fine & CPU/Ram usage is very low too.

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tompkin

All of these nice features, and yet no cross platform browser.  :dontgetit:

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Boo Berry

All of these nice features, and yet no cross platform browser.  :dontgetit:

Why would they need a cross platform browser? There's plenty to choose from.

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tompkin

Why would they need a cross platform browser? There's plenty to choose from.

To me, each one has a problem. 

 

Chrome desktop syncs with my Android browser well. But the problem is, on my desktop machine it's bloaty. All things being equal I would prefer IE. At least on my machine, IE is snappier.

 

Firefox works great on my desktop, but the mobile browsers performance is almost unusable. Slow and frequent stalls. 

 

IE works great on the desktop, but again no syncing on the android phone or tablet.

 

Opera's mobile browser on the phone/tablet seems to be in the same condition as Firefox on mobile according to their support forums. (I haven't tried it.)

 

I was hoping that Edge would be a snappy browser on Windows 10 and have versions on Android that would sync bookmarks, etc.

 

Alas, it's not a perfect world.  :/

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LUTZIFER

I'm still sticking with IE. IE is super fast, and blocks all ads.

Edge is still in early stages, so who knows, but as it is, I can't use it if it doesn't block ads, as is.

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tompkin

I'm still sticking with IE. IE is super fast, and blocks all ads.

Edge is still in early stages, so who knows, but as it is, I can't use it if it doesn't block ads, as is.

I see that you have an LG G3 as well. Did you ever try the bookmark syncing, etc.? 

 

Since all my Microsoft Apps: Office Apps, OneDrive, sync so well via the MS Account, I might forgo bookmark syncing and go back to IE. 

 

I can't believe that Google let Chrome get so bloaty on the desktop. 

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