Meet the browser: Microsoft Edge Next


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BooBerry

With

Windows 10 to Insiders, version 10240

Under the hood changes for Edge have improved the browsers' performance when compared to Chrome. The company released a few stats to showcase the performance improvements.

  • On WebKit Sunspider, Edge is 112% faster than Chrome
  • On Google Octane, Edge is 11% faster than Chrome
  • On Apple JetStream, Edge is 37% faster than Chrome
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+Audioboxer

Impressed with the speed of this browser. Just needs extension support asap!

 

Chromes lack of smooth scrolling sticks out like a sore thumb now.

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PsYcHoKiLLa

Favourites will not stick when you re-order them (and even worse, folders will go into other folders if you don't drop them exactly right), that and the lack of plugins will leave me on Chrome for the moment.

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Boo Berry

Favourites will not stick when you re-order them (and even worse, folders will go into other folders if you don't drop them exactly right)

This was fixed for me in 10166. I can rearrange the order of the favorites and it'll save correctly.

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Boo Berry

Chromes lack of smooth scrolling sticks out like a sore thumb now.

They're working on it still, there is some progress from time-to-time.

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elenarie

Still looking like a rotten zombie.

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BooBerry

The results

 

 

 

Apple JetStream

Google Octane

Mozilla Kraken

Peacekeeper

SunSpider

WebXPRT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microsoft Edge

191.59

29992

1152

2681

87.2

370

Google Chrome Stable

168.6

28566

1197.3

4009

184.5

419

Google Chrome Canary

168.21

30130

1072.9

4416

205.8

383

Opera Stable

163.49

28561

1317.8

3801

194.8

409

Vivaldi TP4

163.44

28990

1317.8

4368

214

344

Mozilla Firefox Stable

164.18

27803

1218

4668

185.9

433

Mozilla Firefox Nightly

145.75

26684

1277.1

4451

205

340

Pale Moon Stable

failed

19211

1645.7

2919

164.9

231

 

 

 

The computer was idle while benchmarks were run. Still, some results were puzzling, for instance that Chrome Stable beat Chrome Canary in some benchmarks, that Firefox Stable performed better in all benchmarks than Nightly, or that Pale Moon failed on Apple's JetStream benchmark (it got stuck while running the cdjs test).

Most results are fairly close when you compare them but there are a couple of exceptions:

  1. Microsoft Edge dominates the Apple JetStream and SunSpider benchmark.
  2. Edge's PeaceKeeper performance was weak by a large percentage.
  3. Pale Moon performed considerably worse than other browsers in most -- but not all -- benchmarks.

There is more to a browser than JavaScript performance, especially if the differences in performance are not that noticeable in the real-world.

Microsoft has been right that Edge performs better than Chrome in the browser's the company selected for comparison. It did not perform as well in others though and here it is Peacekeeper more than any other benchmark where it performs badly.

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The_Decryptor

Firefox Nightly has some changes to the way the JS engine handles objects, should be faster in the long run, but currently it slows down some benchmarks.

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+Red King

Edge dropped TPL support?

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Boo Berry

Edge dropped TPL support?

It probably won't need it once extensions are added.

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+Red King

It probably won't need it once extensions are added.

It just means I have to hold off from upgrading to Windows 10. :(

TPL + malware blocking hosts is the current best solution to block ads in IE11.

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Boo Berry

TPL + malware blocking hosts is the current best solution to block ads in IE11.

Nah, I wouldn't say it's the best. Ad blocking (and userscripts) are working fine in both IE and Edge on Windows 10 for me. :)

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+Red King

Nah, I wouldn't say it's the best. Ad blocking (and userscripts) are working fine in both IE and Edge on Windows 10 for me. :)

But without a tracking protection list - you are using a system wide proxy type thing?
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Boo Berry

But without a tracking protection list - you are using a system wide proxy type thing?

Something like that. Don't need to use a tracking protection list as it's built in also when using one of the many good tracking filters available. :)

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  • 1 month later...
Mockingbird

There are more settings under "about:flags" if you don't already know.

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Studio384

As a developer, I'm very thrilled with the progres they're making with ECMAScript 6 support. Already 88% (with experminental features enabled) in the latest build. I'm looking forward to more!

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+Zlip792

Good News and huge move.. WebM is in Development now.

 

http://dev.modern.ie/platform/status/webmcontainer/

 

Opus Audio Codec - High Priority Backlog

OGG Vorbis - Medium Priority Backlog

Complete U Turn in good way. IMO.

Edited by Zlip792
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  • 4 weeks later...
George P

They're going to make Edge support pretty much everything they can, it'll just take time but odds are if it's a open standard/code etc,  and it's in use to some degree on the web, they'll support it.   I don't worry about EdgeHTML and Javascript performance, I just want them to move faster with user facing features that people are asking for, and no I don't mean extension support, it's other little things that are needed that even IE11 has/does.

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Studio384

Caniuse.com is also listing Edge 14 already, not sure there have been any official announcements about that update though. Should start to see it in the next preview. :)

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