Complete Switch to *NIX and Linux: May 17, 2015


Recommended Posts

simplezz

hopefully not productivity in real world environment  :D

Nice troll. Thankfully, we GNU/Linux users know that's completely false. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Linux provides superior productivity in every way imaginable.

Imagine tailoring your environment to your exact specifications and productivity needs with ease. Good luck trying to do that on Windows with your Candycrush crapware ;)

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
f0rk_b0mb

Enjoy, though!

 

All in all, I did have a good time with it, up until a point. Learned a lot. 

 

This was years ago, though. It's probably gotten a lot better since then. 

 

Thanks, I'll try to have a blast! It has come a long way since I first started using it. Every 6 months it gets better.

Link to post
Share on other sites
cork1958

Haven't seen a topic on this in a while, it seems. Never have cared for Ubuntu much myself.

 

Good luck!! :)

 

I have a couple computers here that are strictly Linux, Debian Jessie, and use them very regularly. Don't have any issues going between Windows and Linux and it's a nice change every once in a while.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

The only app that I really miss is Photoshop, but that can be done on my Mac partition.

GIMP + Inkscape covers all my 2d raster/vector graphical needs. However, if you really miss PS, can't you run it through WINE?
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
f0rk_b0mb

Nice troll. Thankfully, we GNU/Linux users know that's completely false. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Linux provides superior productivity in every way imaginable.

Imagine tailoring your environment to your exact specifications and productivity needs with ease. Good luck trying to do that on Windows with your Candycrush crapware ;)

 

Easy buddy. Everybody is entitled to a choice. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
f0rk_b0mb

Haven't seen a topic on this in a while, it seems. Never have cared for Ubuntu much myself.

 

Good luck!! :)

 

I have a couple computers here that are strictly Linux, Debian Jessie, and use them very regularly. Don't have any issues going between Windows and Linux and it's a nice change every once in a while.

 

Thanks! I'll consider Debian if Ubuntu ever gets on my nerve. :)

 

 

GIMP + Inkscape covers all my 2d raster/vector graphical needs. However, if you really miss PS, can't you run it through WINE?

 

I'm slowly adjusting to gimp/inkscape. I only boot into OS X if I'm inpatient and cant figure something out. I'm investigating running PS with WINE (Crossover/playonlinux/ect) now to see if it is worth it. I honestly don't mind the 2 second reboot time... :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshie

My experiences are that in the not too distant future ( less than a month maybe) you will tire of Ubuntu or other Linux Distro's and just go back to stock OSX. You'll realize that there really is no reason to switch. You'll tire of any type of "customization" you can do and just say "screw it" and switch back.

This was my hit. Customization was a lot of fun for a long time, and kept me interested all through Windows 3.x -> XP, as well as Linux. But man, when it wore off, it wore completely off. And once I was bored of tweaking everything, my interest in Linux plummeted. Once you stop caring about being able to make your OS have a dock and look like OS X, there's really no reason not to just use Windows...

 

But I'll keep playing with Linux on the side every now and then. I just feel like I've been waiting 15 years for KDE to stop looking like design bukkake, and the rest of Linux is determined to copy-but-not-copy OS X, which is simply boring to me. Once there's something it can offer that's truly unique and isn't just MOAR CUSTOMZASHUNS, I might reevaluate it as more than just a toy in a VM.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Krome

Been trying Ubuntu on VM and it works great so far... Have to get used to it.  I am more reliant on xterm when I can't seem to access anything.

Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

Once you stop caring about being able to make your OS have a dock and look like OS X, there's really no reason not to just use Windows...

That's simply not true. I don't do much customisation on a regular basis (now that it's setup to my liking), but that's not a reason to abandon it. The software/package management, configurability, variety (distros, WM's/DE's), productivity, community, and security are what make GNU/Linux a great OS. Windows is like a child's toy in comparison.

 

But I'll keep playing with Linux on the side every now and then. I just feel like I've been waiting 15 years for KDE to stop looking like design bukkake, and the rest of Linux is determined to copy-but-not-copy OS X, which is simply boring to me. Once there's something it can offer that's truly unique and isn't just MOAR CUSTOMZASHUNS, I might reevaluate it as more than just a toy in a VM.

Sounds like you don't appreciate the advantages of being able to fully customise the user experience of your OS. The rest of us however, do. Perhaps you're better off sticking to Windows.
Link to post
Share on other sites
The_Observer

how was it getting ubuntu onto your mac, been looking at install ubuntu onto my rMBP and moving to Linux.

Link to post
Share on other sites
HawkMan

I actually submit all of my work for university and documents for coworkers using LaTeX (PDF sent to them of course) and LibreOffice. Seriously Evolution > Outlook. The only app that I really miss is Photoshop, but that can be done on my Mac partition. 

 

You caught me. All I wanted was a stranger's satisfaction on the internet and you ruined it for me, God damn it.  /s

 

Evolution doesn't even compare to outlook. but then I'm guessing you used outlook for the wrong use case, it's not a home mail software, though it works for that to, very well in fact in the latest version, I'd say better than evolution, but for home use you're better off with Windows (live) Mail.

 

In an enterprise environment, that outlook is designed for however, there is no real competition for outlook and it's feature set. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggis

Welcome :)

 

I have been on Linux over 3 years now in march past and i am still loving it

 

I have windows in a VM as my wife does some shopping thing that the submission program they use only works in windows, so once every week i boot up windows for 10 mins lol

 

I also boot it up to do my stats package in VB.NET

 

 

Missing out look? Geary is quite good, i also like thunderbird

Photoshop? I use Gimp, dont get me wrong it took a while to get used to it but its fine now

 

 

The above is right though for a feature rich app you will never beat outlook

 

I have been using Linux on and off for around 20 years now through various distros

 

The furthest back i can remember was Fedora 3

 

Most recently in the last 3 years i have used OpenSuse, Fedora, Debian and i settled on Linux Mint :D

 

My servers run Debian

 

and i have various different distros in VM's (Fedora, Lakka, Arch, Deepin etc)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
vcfan

...when you accidentally walk into a Linux Anonymous meeting

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
f5s4t3

What's special about the Linux world is that distros purpose differs. You can get a linux for programming, a linux for multimedia, a linux for server, a linux for ease of use and so on. You won't find this in the Windows and Mac worlds, not at this level anyway.

 

The above I said is important in that you have to define a need and a purpose and then select a distro... and then rinse and repeat :)

 

Example. CentOS for development as my main distro. I'm also using openSUSE and ArchLinux for development. Chromixium for ease of use, for simplicity and clean look. You can't beat Chromixium at the moment when it comes to Chrome OS-like unintimidating looks.

 

Another thing you won't find in the Windows and the Mac worlds is the ability to share partitions like /home across distros. Or to share one kernel across several distros. Or to have different kernels for the same distro. The level of flexibility is simply astonishing while spoon feeding still exists.

 

Again, the latest above I said is important in that you have to keep focus on your defined needs and purposes... and I also have a Surface Pro   :)

 

Why a complete switch ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
forumhound

What are you tweaking? The desktop? The icons? That's not tweaking...that's playing...

I just find it funny how most people that are using Linux need to go back into a Windows environment to accomplish something or need to use wine or whatever to use a windows based piece of software. 

I wonder how many people are TRULY committed to Linux? No Windows based anything to function every day? I'm betting not a lot.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kozukumi

I switched to Linux only on my ThinkPad X220 and found myself using that machine more than any other as it worked so well. I love having such a small machine as I can take it everywhere and it has really good battery life. The CPU is a 2nd gen i7, 8GB RAM and a Samsung 850 EVO makes it crazy fast. Plus the IPS display is beautiful, it is only 1366x768 but on a 12.5" screen it is actually pretty nice, things are big enough to see with 100% scaling.

 

I love my minimal Linux install. It boots in a couple of seconds, gets me around 9 hours battery life and works exactly how I want it too. I love Windows too but something about putting all the bits together exactly how I want the system to run is pretty great too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
LargeLarry

I switched to Arch linux 2 years ago.  I dont know how familiar you are with the command line, but this is the book i learned from. Its free to download.  "The Linux Command Line"  http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Depicus

I just find it funny how most people that are using Linux need to go back into a Windows environment to accomplish something or need to use wine or whatever to use a windows based piece of software. 

I wonder how many people are TRULY committed to Linux? No Windows based anything to function every day? I'm betting not a lot.

 

And there is a good reason why, Microsoft spend billions of dollars on marketing and have a near monopoly on distribution so developers follow the money. Hence there are not as many consumer polished apps for Linux BUT that doesn't make Windows any better for everybody. I wonder why you think it has to be a battle between Linux and Windows, can people not use both ? I know I prefer one over the other but both do what I need and that is to work for me.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
forumhound

And there is a good reason why, Microsoft spend billions of dollars on marketing and have a near monopoly on distribution so developers follow the money. Hence there are not as many consumer polished apps for Linux BUT that doesn't make Windows any better for everybody. I wonder why you think it has to be a battle between Linux and Windows, can people not use both ? I know I prefer one over the other but both do what I need and that is to work for me.

Oh absolutely they can use both. I have no issue with any Operating System. Whatever works for you is what works for you. But I really don't buy the "not as many polished apps" theory. Linux in one form or another has been around forever. They have viable alternatives to just about every commercial Windows software out there. I was just saying that it makes me giggle when I see someone "converting" to Linux when in reality they really haven't. 

"Down with Microsoft"! "Down with Apple"! "They overcharge"! "Big brother" !Oh, wait, I need to use photoshop...never mind

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Depicus

Oh absolutely they can use both. I have no issue with any Operating System. Whatever works for you is what works for you. But I really don't buy the "not as many polished apps" theory. Linux in one form or another has been around forever. They have viable alternatives to just about every commercial Windows software out there. I was just saying that it makes me giggle when I see someone "converting" to Linux when in reality they really haven't.

 

Fair enough but I disagree with the polished apps argument. You simply cannot get a comparable Photoshop app on Linux. I'm sure there are other examples like Visual Studio - I won't argue Office because for what 95% of people use it for there are alternatives but sometimes you just cannot move away from Windows.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kozukumi

Fair enough but I disagree with the polished apps argument. You simply cannot get a comparable Photoshop app on Linux. I'm sure there are other examples like Visual Studio - I won't argue Office because for what 95% of people use it for there are alternatives but sometimes you just cannot move away from Windows.

 

Guess it depends on what you mean by polished.

 

For me a polished application is one that does all I want and does it well. Windows might have Photoshop but they don't have a first party C++11/14 feature complete standard library or compiler. They don't have free kernel level debuggers to the same quality as I can get on Linux, they don't have a POSIX sub-system, it doesn't have built in way to do things like a chroot. These, to me, are highly polished things that Linux has which Windows does not (although some things are coming, such as containers which is cool).

 

For all the billions of dollars Microsoft still don't have a fully featured C++11 compiler yet GCC and Clang have been feature complete for about 4 years now targeting multiple platforms and architectures.

 

The command line on Windows got a bit better with Psh but they still lack a good set of cli tools to work in Psh with. Hell even cmdlets for UNIX-like tools would be better than nothing.

 

So yeah Windows is more polished in some areas, mainly front-end applications like Photoshop and Office but it is pretty poor in many other areas, at least in my use cases.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Depicus

Guess it depends on what you mean by polished....

 

So yeah Windows is more polished in some areas, mainly front-end applications like Photoshop and Office but it is pretty poor in many other areas, at least in my use cases.

 

Would not disagree with you on anything there but I suspect we are in the minority.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
forumhound

Fair enough but I disagree with the polished apps argument. You simply cannot get a comparable Photoshop app on Linux. I'm sure there are other examples like Visual Studio - I won't argue Office because for what 95% of people use it for there are alternatives but sometimes you just cannot move away from Windows.

 I'll give you the Photoshop one but only by a very, very slight margin. However, how many people TRULY NEED to use Photoshop? Are you a professional? Sure but I think the majority of users are just that. Users. I'm sure there are going to be people that say they need to use it for this reason or that reason but I'm talking about the people that have a career and depend on it to feed their family. I'm thinking that number is very small. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
TDT

The reason why I'm going Linux is because I'm not spending 5 grand on a Mac Pro. Screw Hackintoshes. That's even harder than Linux. LOL!

 

 

Not anymore. These days, almost everyone can install osx on its desktop/notebook with very little effort. Unless you want a "vanilla" installation, that could be a little harder to do.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Canonical announces end of life date for Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical has announced that Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is set to lose support on July 22, 2021. As the release was one of those between the Long-Term Support (LTS) releases, it only has nine months of life. Those running this particular version of Ubuntu are urged to upgrade their systems to Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo which has been available since April.

      To assist you in upgrading your computer, Canonical has published a guide that runs through everything you need to know and do to get to the latest version. If you’re not sure which version of Ubuntu you have, open Settings, scroll down the left-hand pane until you reach About, and then look under OS Name and you should be able to see which version you are on. Most people checking should find that they’re on Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS, which is supported until 2025.

      After July 22, systems with Ubuntu 20.10 can still be used but they won’t receive important security updates. Quickly, you’ll notice your web browser become outdated which will only increase your risk. If you have a particular use for Ubuntu 20.10 which is preventing you from upgrading, disconnecting your computer from the internet and keeping it offline is another option you have for staying safe

      For most people, the Long-Term Support versions of Ubuntu are best because upgrades are only needed every couple of years. The interim releases, while stable, act more like a testing ground for new features between LTS releases.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs are now ready for download
      by Paul Hill



      Earlier this week, Neowin reported that the Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs were undergoing final testing before being made available. Today, you can now download Linux Mint 20.2 beta from a choice of the Cinnamon, MATE, or Xfce editions.

      One of the main updates in Linux Mint 20.2 is to the Update Manager and the way it handles and alerts users to updates. On Linux Mint systems, all of the installed software, including apps, are updated centrally in the Update Manager. To bring more centralisation to the system, Cinnamon spices (add-ons in Cinnamon) are now visible in the Update Manager whenever there’s an update for them.

      Another issue with the Update Manager is that, by default, the user needs to apply updates manually but not everybody does. To remedy this, infrequent notifications will be displayed to users to let them know that there are available updates. The people that see these notifications will likely not be the type of people who keep their system up to date so they are offered the option to enable automatic updates so they’re never bothered by them again. Doing things this way gives users a choice over whether updates should be forced on users.

      There are a few new app additions in this update. The first is a new XApp called Buiky which allows you to bulk rename files on your system. Bulky is not included in the Xfce edition because the Thunar file manager already has this feature baked in. The other new app is Sticky Notes which replaces GNote as the default app for taking notes. Sticky Notes is built using GTK3, supports HiDPI, and integrates well with the desktop environment so it should be nice to use.

      Included in the release notes is also a mention of an unofficial Warpinator app for Android. Warpinator is a tool that Linux Mint developed a little while ago that allows you to send files between Linux Mint machines on your local network. With the Warpinator Android app, you’ll be able to easily send files to and from your mobile devices.

      Finally, the Cinnamon edition ships with Cinnamon 5.0 which includes a new content search feature. It also comes with fixes for several memory leaks which should improve its performance. A slightly unusual change coming with Cinnamon 5.0 is the ability to limit the total amount of RAM Cinnamon can use. If the limit is reached, Cinnamon will restart itself but you won’t lose your session or windows. When the limit is reached, Cinnamon becomes unresponsive for a second while performing an internal reboot.

      In the Linux Mint world, beta testing usually runs for a couple of weeks before the stable release is made available. Upgrading from Linux Mint 20 and 21 will be made available a little bit after the stable release is made available. The upgrade should be available via the Update Manager and should be painless.

    • By hellowalkman
      Intel's Speed Select Technology ironically hurting performance, but a fix is coming
      by Sayan Sen

      Intel's Speed Select Technology (SST) is a power management solution from the company that allows users to manage core prioritization and frequency regulation depending on the workloads in order to improve performance and efficiency.

      However, as an Intel engineer has observed, there is performance regression by more than 10% in benchmarks with the mode enabled. And while it isn't stated, the impact in a real workload might be lower but it's still a cause for concern.

      The engineer further explains that the standard Linux PCI interface which is used here is causing the delay as it searches through hundreds of PCI devices, during mapping, that are attached to the system. For those wondering why the need to mention hundreds of devices here, that's because Intel SST is a complex solution and is only available in Xeons and not in the mainstream Core lineup.

      Since the root cause of the problem has been identified, the good news is that a patch that promises to fix this should be available soon via a future firmware if it isn't already out. The fix is a fairly simple one and will use the cached data that will speed up the search process.

      Here's what the full LKML message says:

      Intel launched SST back in 2019 inside Cascade Lake Xeon CPUs. The technology is quite versatile as it enables several options like setting core prioritization, base clock tweaking, and more. As stated above, SST is implemented in the firmware and carried out by the processor's Power Control Unit (PCU). For more information on SST, visit Intel's official site here.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs undergo testing and are due soon [Update]
      by Paul Hill



      At the end of May, it was reported that Linux Mint 20.2 would see a beta release in mid-June. We’ve reached mid-June and it looks as though the team is running last-minute tests on the beta ISOs before making them available to the public. Following the ISOs’ release, the beta period should run for about two weeks before the stable release is made with upgrade paths opened up.

      The Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce images were tested about 7 hours ago and all failed, the Xfce image was tried again several hours later and failed again, now the Xfce image is being tested a third time along with the MATE edition. Users don’t have to worry about these tests, only, the longer they take to pass, the longer you’ll all be waiting to try out the beta.

      Linux Mint 20.2 has been given the codename Uma and is an iterative upgrade in the 20.x series which began in the first half of last year. As with the other versions in the Linux Mint 20.x series, this update will be supported until April or May 2025. Once security updates stop, you can continue to use it but you won’t be safe especially if you connect to the internet with the device.

      Linux Mint 20.2 will come with a new XApp called Bulky that allows you to rename files in bulk, the Nemo 5.0 file manager will be present in the Cinnamon edition, and the local file sharing tool Warpinator will now give you the option to compress files that are sent to reduce the transfer time.

      Update: Since the publication of this article, beta builds of Linux Mint 20.2 have passed the tests.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 'Uma' to get beta release by mid-June
      by Paul Hill



      Clement Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has published a blog post revealing that Linux Mint 20.2 is codenamed 'Uma' and is set for a beta release by the middle of June. The new release will still be based upon Ubuntu 20.04 LTS but comes with an upgrade to the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce desktops and comes with newer hardware enablement stacks that ship with Ubuntu LTS point releases.

      Linux Mint 20.2 will feature a new XApp (apps made by the Mint team) called Bulky that allows the users to rename files in bulk on both the Cinnamon and MATE versions of Mint. On Xfce, the Thunar file manager already comes with an embedded bulk renamer so Bulky won’t need to be shipped with the Xfce edition of Mint.

      Another change in Linux Mint 20.2 is the inclusion of Nemo 5.0, the file manager on the Cinnamon edition of Linux Mint. With Nemo 5.0, users can now perform a content search in addition to a file’s name. The new content search will look for search terms within documents and return the document to the user if the search finds anything relevant.

      The local file-sharing program Warpinator, which was released with Linux Mint 20, has also been updated. Now, users can select which network interface they want to share files on if they have several available. Additionally, a new option to compress files that are sent has been added, this should reduce the amount of time it takes to send large files.

      Finally, the NVIDIA Prime applet has been updated to fix an issue where the applet would disappear from the tray. It also contains support for computers with AMD/NVIDIA hybrids.

      Linux Mint 20.2, just like the rest of the 20.x series, will be supported until around April or May of 2025. At that time, it will stop receiving software updates and users will need to upgrade if they want their system to stay secure.