Complete Switch to *NIX and Linux: May 17, 2015


Recommended Posts

Mindovermaster

Well, for one, Photoshop. Past version 7, I never got it working.

 

Also, League of Legends never worked for me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

Well, for one, Photoshop. Past version 7

Yes, I've heard some versions of PS can be problematic. You'd be better off either converting to GIMP or running it in a Windows guest VM.

Also, League of Legends never worked for me.

https://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=19141

There are step by step instructions on how to install LoL on its Appdb page. Did you try them?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster

I use Krita these days.

 

I did successfully install it, but After all the updates, I get a blank screen..

Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

 

One of the best things about Linux personally is font tuning. Windows has seriously awful font rendering these days. OS X is really good but you can tweak everything with Linux and get beautiful fonts on ~100DPI screens easily. For exampleattachicon.gif1433575064113.png

See, I've always seen it the other way around. Out of the box, GNU/Linux looks horrible compared to Windows and OS X with font rendering. I then spend the next hour or two tweaking it to look as good as either of them.

Skyrim data files are OS independent, so yes.

Gold, Platinum, and Silver listed Games/Apps usually run without problems. Most of the ones I've tried work. I play Diablo 2 a fair bit at the start of a new ladder through it. As for SC2, according to WineHQ, it's platinum rated. So it should work fine. What exactly are you having a problem with?

How about a list of said games that work better in GNU/Linux?

 

Diablo 2 is a horrible example.

Not sure if serious or just trolling...

Hard to say. Its kind of like a unicorn in these conversations. We always hear about it, yet we never see it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
TDT

Well, for one, Photoshop. Past version 7, I never got it working.

CS6 and CC works perfectly with PlayOnLinux. Download the installer script from their site and it's done automatically.

 

See, I've always seen it the other way around. Out of the box, GNU/Linux looks horrible compared to Windows and OS X with font rendering. I then spend the next hour or two tweaking it to look as good as either of them.

 

Agreed.

 

Hard to say. Its kind of like a unicorn in these conversations. We always hear about it, yet we never see it.

 

I'm more curious about that statement of his, about ANY game working fine. Those people from Wine, with 162 pages of not working apps and games must be idiots...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
vmlinuz

 

See, I've always seen it the other way around. Out of the box, GNU/Linux looks horrible compared to Windows and OS X with font rendering. I then spend the next hour or two tweaking it to look as good as either of them.

How about a list of said games that work better in GNU/Linux?

 

Diablo 2 is a horrible example.

Hard to say. Its kind of like a unicorn in these conversations. We always hear about it, yet we never see it.

 

Actually Diablo II is a perfect example. Older versions of Diablo II, such as 1.09d and 1.10 (needed by some mods), don't work well (if at all) on modern Windows (Vista and up). They work perfectly on Linux, however. I also agree with the font rendering - it's absolutely terrible on Windows. Linux font rendering is miles ahead and, again, can be tweaked to the nth degree.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

Actually Diablo II is a perfect example. Older versions of Diablo II, such as 1.09d and 1.10 (needed by some mods), don't work well (if at all) on modern Windows (Vista and up). They work perfectly on Linux, however. I also agree with the font rendering - it's absolutely terrible on Windows. Linux font rendering is miles ahead and, again, can be tweaked to the nth degree.

It only took GNU/Linux 10-15 years to run Diablo 2 better than Windows.

 

Impressive.

Link to post
Share on other sites
smooth_criminal1990

So on a practical note, what sort of system specs are you guys talking about for 60+FPS in games?

 

I've not tried native gaming on Linux for 5 or so years, and I'm 99% sure virtualisation (a Windows gaming VM on Linux) won't cut it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
vmlinuz

It only took GNU/Linux 10-15 years to run Diablo 2 better than Windows.

 

Impressive.

Rubbish. I've been playing Diablo II for many many years on Linux.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Crimson Rain

My experiences are that in the not too distant future ( less than a month maybe) you will tire of Ubuntu or other Linux Distro's and just go back to stock OSX. You'll realize that there really is no reason to switch. You'll tire of any type of "customization" you can do and just say "screw it" and switch back.

It is funny how some people still don't understand how true this comment is.

 

Your devices (desktop/laptop/tablet/phones etc) are things to get your work done; not things that you work on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
vmlinuz

It is funny how some people still don't understand how true this comment is.

 

Your devices (desktop/laptop/tablet/phones etc) are things to get your work done; not things that you work on.

Completely depends on the individual. I *never* get tired of customizing my desktop, kernel and other things and I've been doing it *every single day* since 1998 (when I started using Linux). I do not use my desktop "to get work done", not in the traditional sense. I class my gaming and all my content and entertainment (I have 42TB of space filled to the brim of stuff) as "productive work". My desktop is something I work on and I never tire from it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jub

playing Bioshock Infinite, Metro: Last Light, Killing Floor 1 and Outlast and Skyrim all running on Ultra Graphics at a minimum of 60+ FPS. 

 

Either Linux has secret sauce or your MacBook Air is indeed made of air.  :s

Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

It only took GNU/Linux 10-15 years to run Diablo 2 better than Windows.

I'm sorry but that's complete ###### adrynalyne. I've been playing Diablo 2 on Linux for nearly 10 years on and off, and it just keeps getting better while the Windows version has been getting progressively worse and worse. You clearly have no idea what you're talking about.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

Your devices (desktop/laptop/tablet/phones etc) are things to get your work done; not things that you work on.

Generalising statement is generalising. Everyone has different needs and wants. Some like to tinker, some like to have a system up and running and productive without having to tweak. A variety of Linux distros satisfies all those requirements. Windows on the other hand allows less and less customisation with every iteration, often requiring hacks (that can break a system) to make even basic changes.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
vmlinuz

Either Linux has secret sauce or your MacBook Air is indeed made of air.  :s

Indeed, Linux has many secrets which you can unlock. It's unlimited power.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jub

Indeed, Linux has many secrets which you can unlock. It's unlimited power.

 

I have discovered many of its secrets since the 90s, and I keep discovering more with each new machine I set up, however, this

Link to post
Share on other sites
Gotenks98

Calling shenanigans on the gaming aspect of Linux. I have tried this recently over the past 2 weeks. Wine and/or Play on Linux is a bit of a pain to get stuff installed. I play a lot of MMOs and I could only get some of them to work. The one I really want to test out was Aion. However the play on Linux installer installs the EU version of the game's launcher which isn't changeable and does not let the NA account owners even sign in to launch the game. Linux is nice for some things but its going to need a lot of work before I could even think about having it native 24/7. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
vmlinuz

Calling shenanigans on the gaming aspect of Linux. I have tried this recently over the past 2 weeks. Wine and/or Play on Linux is a bit of a pain to get stuff installed. I play a lot of MMOs and I could only get some of them to work. The one I really want to test out was Aion. However the play on Linux installer installs the EU version of the game's launcher which isn't changeable and does not let the NA account owners even sign in to launch the game. Linux is nice for some things but its going to need a lot of work before I could even think about having it native 24/7. 

Call what you want. I find Linux to be far superior for gaming, and WINE / Crossover etc is very very easy to use and everything I have thrown at it works, and works better than Windows. Linux works so well for gaming, I don't even bother with Windows (I wouldn't anyway). The main task of my (high end) desktop IS gaming. And I only use Linux to do it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
smooth_criminal1990

Call what you want. I find Linux to be far superior for gaming, and WINE / Crossover etc is very very easy to use and everything I have thrown at it works, and works better than Windows. Linux works so well for gaming, I don't even bother with Windows (I wouldn't anyway). The main task of my (high end) desktop IS gaming. And I only use Linux to do it.

Out of curiosity, what are the specs of your desktop? I've been wanting to try this again for a while.

Link to post
Share on other sites
vmlinuz

Out of curiosity, what are the specs of your desktop? I've been wanting to try this again for a while.

Intel Core i7 3770 @ stock (non-k)

GTX 970

16GB RAM

42 TB drive space, including SSD

Dell U2713H (2560 x 1440, 120% colour gamut)

Running both openSUSE point release (currently 13.2) and openSUSE Tumbleweed (rolling)

Link to post
Share on other sites
guitmz

WINE is NOT an emulator.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

I'm sorry but that's complete ###### adrynalyne. I've been playing Diablo 2 on Linux for nearly 10 years on and off, and it just keeps getting better while the Windows version has been getting progressively worse and worse. You clearly have no idea what you're talking about.

Diablo II keeps getting better?  I guess. I stopped playing it 10 years ago. On a side note, my Windows 3.1 installation keeps getting better all the time.  :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision

I'm one of the biggest Linux "fanboys" out there -- and a sometimes-critic too. (If I didn't care I wouldn't say anything, right?)

 

There's stuff that I can't get working on WINE as well. It isn't the "magic bullet", but it's getting better and better. The people that work on WINE are volunteers, by and large. They do not get paid for that work. It's a labor of love and a challenge to them.

 

Not bad for a free Operating System that in turn is employing a compatibility layer which is also free. Play on Linux is free as well. The Crossover Project (which foots the bill for WINE as needed) is the "pay" version and offers more features and support.

 

Steam/Valve is also doing their part to improve things. We all know & generally love them to pieces.

 

Let's be a little more understanding and kind to Linux & WINE, folks. It's mostly free, and one will not find the local Authorities at their doorstep for sharing the OS and related software with their neighbors or friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites
simplezz

WINE is NOT an emulator.

That gets lost on a lot of people from the Windows world. They seem to think it has the performance penalties of a bog standard emulator. Which it doesn't. It implements the Win32 API so that Windows PE's run on Linux. In the case of Gaming, it converts calls from DirectX/3D to OpenGL, similar to how a game engine would support multiple library code paths. There's no performance loss per se. And in many cases, due to Linux's superior OS design & efficiency (vs Windows), the games in question actually run faster. Valve found this to be true while porting its engine to GNU/Linux.

Link to post
Share on other sites
dlf

How would I even get my CD's (Diablo, Diablo 2 (LOD), WarCraft 2 TOD & BTDP/BNE, Warcraft 3), (Heroes of) MIght & Magic to be read by linux (specifically WINE/POL)?

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Canonical announces end of life date for Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical has announced that Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is set to lose support on July 22, 2021. As the release was one of those between the Long-Term Support (LTS) releases, it only has nine months of life. Those running this particular version of Ubuntu are urged to upgrade their systems to Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo which has been available since April.

      To assist you in upgrading your computer, Canonical has published a guide that runs through everything you need to know and do to get to the latest version. If you’re not sure which version of Ubuntu you have, open Settings, scroll down the left-hand pane until you reach About, and then look under OS Name and you should be able to see which version you are on. Most people checking should find that they’re on Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS, which is supported until 2025.

      After July 22, systems with Ubuntu 20.10 can still be used but they won’t receive important security updates. Quickly, you’ll notice your web browser become outdated which will only increase your risk. If you have a particular use for Ubuntu 20.10 which is preventing you from upgrading, disconnecting your computer from the internet and keeping it offline is another option you have for staying safe

      For most people, the Long-Term Support versions of Ubuntu are best because upgrades are only needed every couple of years. The interim releases, while stable, act more like a testing ground for new features between LTS releases.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs are now ready for download
      by Paul Hill



      Earlier this week, Neowin reported that the Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs were undergoing final testing before being made available. Today, you can now download Linux Mint 20.2 beta from a choice of the Cinnamon, MATE, or Xfce editions.

      One of the main updates in Linux Mint 20.2 is to the Update Manager and the way it handles and alerts users to updates. On Linux Mint systems, all of the installed software, including apps, are updated centrally in the Update Manager. To bring more centralisation to the system, Cinnamon spices (add-ons in Cinnamon) are now visible in the Update Manager whenever there’s an update for them.

      Another issue with the Update Manager is that, by default, the user needs to apply updates manually but not everybody does. To remedy this, infrequent notifications will be displayed to users to let them know that there are available updates. The people that see these notifications will likely not be the type of people who keep their system up to date so they are offered the option to enable automatic updates so they’re never bothered by them again. Doing things this way gives users a choice over whether updates should be forced on users.

      There are a few new app additions in this update. The first is a new XApp called Buiky which allows you to bulk rename files on your system. Bulky is not included in the Xfce edition because the Thunar file manager already has this feature baked in. The other new app is Sticky Notes which replaces GNote as the default app for taking notes. Sticky Notes is built using GTK3, supports HiDPI, and integrates well with the desktop environment so it should be nice to use.

      Included in the release notes is also a mention of an unofficial Warpinator app for Android. Warpinator is a tool that Linux Mint developed a little while ago that allows you to send files between Linux Mint machines on your local network. With the Warpinator Android app, you’ll be able to easily send files to and from your mobile devices.

      Finally, the Cinnamon edition ships with Cinnamon 5.0 which includes a new content search feature. It also comes with fixes for several memory leaks which should improve its performance. A slightly unusual change coming with Cinnamon 5.0 is the ability to limit the total amount of RAM Cinnamon can use. If the limit is reached, Cinnamon will restart itself but you won’t lose your session or windows. When the limit is reached, Cinnamon becomes unresponsive for a second while performing an internal reboot.

      In the Linux Mint world, beta testing usually runs for a couple of weeks before the stable release is made available. Upgrading from Linux Mint 20 and 21 will be made available a little bit after the stable release is made available. The upgrade should be available via the Update Manager and should be painless.

    • By hellowalkman
      Intel's Speed Select Technology ironically hurting performance, but a fix is coming
      by Sayan Sen

      Intel's Speed Select Technology (SST) is a power management solution from the company that allows users to manage core prioritization and frequency regulation depending on the workloads in order to improve performance and efficiency.

      However, as an Intel engineer has observed, there is performance regression by more than 10% in benchmarks with the mode enabled. And while it isn't stated, the impact in a real workload might be lower but it's still a cause for concern.

      The engineer further explains that the standard Linux PCI interface which is used here is causing the delay as it searches through hundreds of PCI devices, during mapping, that are attached to the system. For those wondering why the need to mention hundreds of devices here, that's because Intel SST is a complex solution and is only available in Xeons and not in the mainstream Core lineup.

      Since the root cause of the problem has been identified, the good news is that a patch that promises to fix this should be available soon via a future firmware if it isn't already out. The fix is a fairly simple one and will use the cached data that will speed up the search process.

      Here's what the full LKML message says:

      Intel launched SST back in 2019 inside Cascade Lake Xeon CPUs. The technology is quite versatile as it enables several options like setting core prioritization, base clock tweaking, and more. As stated above, SST is implemented in the firmware and carried out by the processor's Power Control Unit (PCU). For more information on SST, visit Intel's official site here.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 beta ISOs undergo testing and are due soon [Update]
      by Paul Hill



      At the end of May, it was reported that Linux Mint 20.2 would see a beta release in mid-June. We’ve reached mid-June and it looks as though the team is running last-minute tests on the beta ISOs before making them available to the public. Following the ISOs’ release, the beta period should run for about two weeks before the stable release is made with upgrade paths opened up.

      The Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce images were tested about 7 hours ago and all failed, the Xfce image was tried again several hours later and failed again, now the Xfce image is being tested a third time along with the MATE edition. Users don’t have to worry about these tests, only, the longer they take to pass, the longer you’ll all be waiting to try out the beta.

      Linux Mint 20.2 has been given the codename Uma and is an iterative upgrade in the 20.x series which began in the first half of last year. As with the other versions in the Linux Mint 20.x series, this update will be supported until April or May 2025. Once security updates stop, you can continue to use it but you won’t be safe especially if you connect to the internet with the device.

      Linux Mint 20.2 will come with a new XApp called Bulky that allows you to rename files in bulk, the Nemo 5.0 file manager will be present in the Cinnamon edition, and the local file sharing tool Warpinator will now give you the option to compress files that are sent to reduce the transfer time.

      Update: Since the publication of this article, beta builds of Linux Mint 20.2 have passed the tests.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint 20.2 'Uma' to get beta release by mid-June
      by Paul Hill



      Clement Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has published a blog post revealing that Linux Mint 20.2 is codenamed 'Uma' and is set for a beta release by the middle of June. The new release will still be based upon Ubuntu 20.04 LTS but comes with an upgrade to the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce desktops and comes with newer hardware enablement stacks that ship with Ubuntu LTS point releases.

      Linux Mint 20.2 will feature a new XApp (apps made by the Mint team) called Bulky that allows the users to rename files in bulk on both the Cinnamon and MATE versions of Mint. On Xfce, the Thunar file manager already comes with an embedded bulk renamer so Bulky won’t need to be shipped with the Xfce edition of Mint.

      Another change in Linux Mint 20.2 is the inclusion of Nemo 5.0, the file manager on the Cinnamon edition of Linux Mint. With Nemo 5.0, users can now perform a content search in addition to a file’s name. The new content search will look for search terms within documents and return the document to the user if the search finds anything relevant.

      The local file-sharing program Warpinator, which was released with Linux Mint 20, has also been updated. Now, users can select which network interface they want to share files on if they have several available. Additionally, a new option to compress files that are sent has been added, this should reduce the amount of time it takes to send large files.

      Finally, the NVIDIA Prime applet has been updated to fix an issue where the applet would disappear from the tray. It also contains support for computers with AMD/NVIDIA hybrids.

      Linux Mint 20.2, just like the rest of the 20.x series, will be supported until around April or May of 2025. At that time, it will stop receiving software updates and users will need to upgrade if they want their system to stay secure.