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Official SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition

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Draggendrop    5,747

Hyperloop Pod Hovers for the First Time

 

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University of Cincinnati's Hyperloop pod prototype 

 

 

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The University of Cincinnati's Hyperloop pod prototype achieved magnetic levitation and is headed to a test track at SpaceX headquarters in early 2017.

 

One small hover for man, one giant levitation for mankind. It was only a quarter of an inch, but a team from the University of Cincinnati got their sizable Hyperloop pod prototype to hover above the tracks in front of a cheering crowd.

 

The interdisciplinary UC Hyperloop team, led by aerospace engineering graduate student Dhaval Shiyani, wants their pod to one day carry passengers from Cincinnati to Chicago in a mere 30 minutes. Their modular prototype calls for separate passenger and engine areas. According to their description, the pod is outfitted with Arx Pax hover engines.

 

This pod is one of several participating in a student competition organized by SpaceX CEO and Hyperloop idea originator Elon Musk. His vision: Create futuristic high-speed transportation pods that travel through low-pressure vacuum tubes. Musk and SpaceX have no affiliation with the commercial companies that have sprung up to develop the tech, but they are encouraging students from around the world to go all out.

 

Quote

UC's team definitely took that to heart. Their 14-foot-long prototype Hyperloop pod achieved magnetic levitation during a demo last week. Other big challenges remain for this transportation system beyond levitation — including some that may stymie even the brightest researchers — but seeing a pod prototype hover for real is exciting.

article source (long)

 

Hyperloop UC pod hovering

video is 33 sec.

 

 

 

Full Size Mock-up

 

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A lot of neat designs....:D

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Beittil    575

Cool TU Delft Hyperloop promo by DHL :)

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

 

THE OFFICIAL SPACEX HYPERLOOP POD COMPETITION

 

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Since we first unveiled the idea for a new high-speed ground transport system called the Hyperloop back in 2013, there has been a tremendous amount of interest in the concept. We are excited that a handful of private companies have chosen to pursue this effort.

 

Neither SpaceX nor Elon Musk is affiliated with any Hyperloop companies. While we are not developing a commercial Hyperloop ourselves, we are interested in helping to accelerate development of a functional Hyperloop prototype.

 

For this reason, SpaceX is running an open competition, geared towards university students and independent engineering teams, to design and build the best Hyperloop pod. To support this competition, SpaceX is constructing a test track adjacent to our Hawthorne, California headquarters. Teams will be able to test their human-scale pods during a competition weekend at the track, scheduled for January 27-29, 2017. The knowledge gained here will continue to be open-sourced.

 

Based on the high-quality submissions and overwhelming enthusiasm surrounding the competition, SpaceX is moving forward with a second installment of the competition: Hyperloop Pod Competition II, which will culminate in a second competition in Summer 2017 at SpaceX’s Hyperloop test track. Hyperloop Competition II will be focused on a single criterion: maximum speed. The second competition is open to new student teams interested in competing on the test track, as well as to existing student teams who have already built and tested Pods to further refine their designs.

 

Note: This competition is a SpaceX event. SpaceX has no affiliation with any Hyperloop companies, including, but not limited to, those frequently referenced by the media.

 

Break a pod!

Competition Weekend I will take place January 27-29, 2017.

Registration for SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition II closed on September 30, 2016.

http://www.spacex.com/hyperloop

 

:woot:

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DocM    16,543

A segment of the Hyperloop test track being built outside SpaceX's factory in Hawthorne, California.

 

spacex-hyperloop1.jpg

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DocM    16,543

 

Hyperloop One company test track concept for Nevada

 

construction-on-musk-s-first-hyperloop-t

 

Which is being turned into reality. This will carry passengers after preliminary testing, and they're talking to the UAE, Russia. China and others about passenger and cargo Hyperloops.

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Now, we're talking the Jetson's.....:woot:

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Unobscured Vision    2,668

If California doesn't get their act together, it won't be happening in California at all. And with what's happened to California's High-Speed Rail system (citation: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/infrastructure-lessons-from-the-california-high-speed-rail-fiasco/article/2612379), the Hyperloop stands little to no chance of actually being built there unless Private Interest does it.

 

And fat chance of California's Legislature not sticking their noses into it ... the most over-regulated State in the West. Yeah. Terrible Governor, terrible politics, terrible business climate. Terrible pretty much everything there. Lot of great people though.

 

want the Hyperloop to get built. I'm a fan of Musk, and of his endeavors. But California is a terrible place to do pretty much anything. :no: 

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DocM    16,543

One of several in the works is a proposed 500 km link from Helsinki to Stockholm

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hyperloop-one-fs-links-and-kpmg-publish-worlds-first-study-of-full-scale-hyperloop-system-300294040.html


 

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LOS ANGELES, July 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Hyperloop One, FS Links and KPMG announced today the results from the world's first study of a full-scale Hyperloop system. The research data, presented at the Northern Light business summit in Helsinki, Finland, reinforce the transformational economic and social case for building the proposed 500-kilometer Hyperloop network linking the metro areas and airports of Helsinki and Stockholm. Passengers can make the trip between the capitals in 28 minutes, compared with a 3.5-hour flight or overnight ferry. The value of time saved by the network is an astounding 321 million Euros per year.

 

Revenue for the complete system is estimated to be 1 billion Euros per year with an operating profit of 800 million Euros based on a forecast of 43 million passenger trips a year.

 

"Our findings confirm what we have been saying all along: Hyperloop is a time-saver for commuters and an incredible generator of economic benefits for cities and regions along the route," said Rob Lloyd, CEO, Hyperloop One. "Hyperloop One is ready to take the next step and start construction. The Scandinavian region is a perfect location because of its strong economy, mobile population and global leadership as tech innovators. From the early stages, the region has been at the forefront of exploring Hyperloop as a transportation solution."

 

The cost to complete the entire 500-kilometer Sweden-Finland network is projected to be 19 billion Euros, or 38 million Euros per kilometer on average. This reinforces Hyperloop One's contention all along that Hyperloop technology can deliver higher-speed transportation for less than the cost of high-speed rail. The UK's London to Birmingham fast rail project is currently budgeted at 100 million Euros per kilometer ($180 million per mile) for infrastructure only. California's high-speed rail project is now between 69 to 79 million Euros per kilometer on average ($124 million to $143 million per mile).

 

The Hyperloop network would unlock new economic development in the region, too. Stockholm, for example, has a 13-year waiting list for new rental apartments. Plans by the Swedish government to add 210,000 new commuter homes in the Greater Stockholm can be incorporated into the route, building real estate values around Hyperloop stations that can whisk people to downtown Stockholm in less than 10 minutes.

 

"Hyperloop is the definitive 21st century transportation solution, not only for the Baltic region, but for all of Europe," said Mårten Fröjdö, Partner, FS Links Ab. "The numbers of the study do not lie: there will be a benefit for every city and region involved, especially considering that the study doesn't account for cargo efficiency. We are completely aligned with Hyperloop One and are determined to launch the world's first Hyperloop in Scandinavia."

 

Based on the strength of the study's findings, the city of Salo, Finland, has signed a Letter of Intent with Hyperloop One to become the first Hyperloop city along the proposed Helsinki-Stockholm route. Salo has a strong population of talented engineers eager to fill open tech jobs across the region that a Hyperloop would knit together with on-demand transport.

 

"Salo is an important market for this Hyperloop project because of its technological pedigree," added Lloyd. "To have the city that is the driving force of many of the world's best products and inventions want to be a part of this groundbreaking route is a proof point that Hyperloop will thrive in this region."

 

For more information on the Hyperloop Stockholm to Helsinki Study, visit http://500kmh.com/Hyperloop_Shares/160704-HyperloopOne-FSLinks_KPMG-presentation.pdf. For more information about Hyperloop One, please visit www.hyperloop-one.com

 

About Hyperloop One

 

Hyperloop One is reinventing transportation by developing the world's first Hyperloop, an elegant, integrated structure to move passengers and cargo between two points immediately, safely, efficiently, and sustainably. Our team has the world's leading experts in engineering, technology and transport project delivery, working in tandem with global partners and investors to make Hyperloop a reality, now. The company is headquartered in Los Angeles, CA. For more information, please visit www.hyperloop-one.com.

 

Contact:


Rick Jennings
Step 3 PR for Hyperloop One
rick@step-3.com
310.428.8575

 

 

 

 

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The Evil Overlord    18,441

In the spirit of morbidity, so how fast will it be going when it crashes?

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DocM    16,543

If the power fails Hyperloop Ones car settles into what are essentially passive magnetic brakes. Much like a maglev train. Other variants work differently.

 

Cruise: about 700 - 800 mph 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Since this system works in a, for the most part, vacuum, the issue is controlled acceleration...not the speed, which as Doc mentioned, is aircraft territory. 

 

Edit...note: Elon Musk and any of his companies are not affiliated, in any way, with any "hyperloop" company. He has only supplied the concept, built the test track, created this competition to inspire and have all results as "open source" for others to use in their endeavors.

 

:)

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The Evil Overlord    18,441
1 hour ago, DocM said:

If the power fails Hyperloop Ones car settles into what are essentially passive magnetic brakes. Much like a maglev train. Other variants work differently.

 

Cruise: about 700 - 800 mph 

Slow from 700? that'll still take miles before momentum is ceased, which is why I'm a little cynical on this one

(I guess the high speed train derailment videos have started me thinking)

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The Evil Overlord    18,441
1 hour ago, Draggendrop said:

Since this system works in a, for the most part, vacuum, the issue is controlled acceleration...not the speed, which as Doc mentioned, is aircraft territory. 

 

 

:)

In theory, wouldn't the vacuum system also need some sort of failsafe? As I see it, something goes wrong with a seal at those speeds, not only is the carriage going to need miles to stop, it'll need to replace the loss of air?

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Draggendrop    5,747
Just now, The Evil Overlord said:

Slow from 700? that'll still take miles before momentum is ceased, which is why I'm a little cynical on this one

(I guess the high speed train derailment videos have started me thinking)

This is for long range corridors and the deceleration can be controlled for "g" force. One will be surprised how fast electronic braking is and the route is closed.

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The Evil Overlord    18,441
Just now, Draggendrop said:

This is for long range corridors and the deceleration can be controlled for "g" force. One will be surprised how fast electronic braking is and the route is closed.

But wouldn't 3-5g breaking still need 3+ miles?

any more than that is pilot/astronaut territory, so I was going to rule out anything more extreme than that

(going by the g force on commercial jet take off theory)

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Draggendrop    5,747
1 minute ago, The Evil Overlord said:

In theory, wouldn't the vacuum system also need some sort of failsafe? As I see it, something goes wrong with a seal at those speeds, not only is the carriage going to need miles to stop, it'll need to replace the loss of air?

The vacuum is partial, not a full vacuum. The transport "train" generates the required vacuum for the front of the nose, to reduce atmospheric friction.

Think of it as a "leaker" with a vacuum pump directed in front of the vessel.

 

It is actually very safe, braking and rail clamping with guides.

 

:D 

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Draggendrop    5,747
2 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

But wouldn't 3-5g breaking still need 3+ miles?

any more than that is pilot/astronaut territory, so I was going to rule out anything more extreme than that

(going by the g force on commercial jet take off theory)

This would still be comparable to a high speed train on open rails trying to stop. Here the vessel is contained....no deer crossings....:s

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The Evil Overlord    18,441

I've used up my likes for the day, you're going to have to bear with me

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The Evil Overlord    18,441
1 minute ago, Draggendrop said:

This would still be comparable to a high speed train on open rails trying to stop. Here the vessel is contained....no deer crossings....:s

The other thing that rings an alarm bell, what about subterranean sections, or tectonic plate shift (if this thing is going full intercontinental) I'm seeing red flags everywhere

 

WE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!!

 

where are my meds?

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Draggendrop    5,747
1 minute ago, The Evil Overlord said:

I've used up my likes for the day, you're going to have to bear with me

Actually IMHO, all modes of transportation have inherent risk factors but the hyperloop concept has a controlled "tube" atmosphere, is self contained and designed for high speed corridors where other trains/plane traffic would be required.

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The Evil Overlord    18,441

Off topic but this made me laugh, (and wake my wife up in the process)

my sick and twisted sense of humour kicked in

 

Image1.jpg

 

behold I make a statement The Reaper Man liked :p 

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Draggendrop    5,747
12 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

Off topic but this made me laugh, (and wake my wife up in the process)

my sick and twisted sense of humour kicked in

 

Image1.jpg

 

behold I make a statement The Reaper Man liked :p 

That may be the symbol and statement on the entry door as you give the attendant your ticket.

:s

 

j/k     As an added bonus...In case of a tragic failure, masks will drop down from an above compartment similar to aircraft. Place the mask on correctly and allow the vacuum to suck all the air out of your lungs to end it efficiently.

 

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The Evil Overlord    18,441

^ lol

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DocM    16,543
30 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

Slow from 700? that'll still take miles before momentum is ceased, which is why I'm a little cynical on this one

(I guess the high speed train derailment videos have started me thinking)

The acceleration and deceleration use linear electric motors, with passive magnetic and mechanical brakes as backup. 90% of the time it's coasting on either a magnetic or pneumatic bubble, similar to an air hockey puck. A mail tube on steroids.

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Draggendrop    5,747
1 minute ago, DocM said:

The acceleration and deceleration use linear electric motors, with passive magnetic and mechanical brakes as backup. 90% of the time it's coasting on either a magnetic or pneumatic bubble, similar to an air hockey puck. A mail tube on steroids.

:s  He may not want a ticket now....my bad!

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