I've upgraded 7 machines to Windows 10. How many have you?


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+warwagon

Where's the poll?

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+warwagon

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer 2 monitor workstation

5) All in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement 4 monitor Workstation

Computer i've upgrade just to cash in on the free upgrade but they aren't being used

1) Dell Core 2 Mini PC

2) Dell Inspiron 531S

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) Intel NUC Celeron viewer machine for Secure Cam feed over TV in living room

2) Intel NUC Celeron machine (Spare not being used)

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

6) PC in theater

7) Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

8) 2nd Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

9) 7 Core 2 duo desktop PC's because they are all spare PC's I got from a dentist office and they all have Vista Business stickers :(

Edited by warwagon
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JustGeorge

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer

5) A in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement Workstation

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) VNC viewer machine

2) PC in theater

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

You have a lot of ######, Mr. Wagon.

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DirtyLarry

Zero point Zero.

Never got the notification I could upgrade. I know I can force it to upgrade but really am in no rush. My only Windows PC runs like a well oiled machine and I want to keep it that way.

So I might not even take the plunge whenever I do get the notification it is ready. Really all depends on what type of mood I am in.

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freak180

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

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oldtimefighter
 

People are hung up on your first question, and its why they are answering because from the question it appears you don't understand why others are not doing a clean install.

 

I did question why every single person on Neowin seemed to be doing a update (and half of them bitching it wasn't working) and nobody was doing a new install which is a valid question.

People were being rude (starting with you) in their replies saying I must not know about the reset option even after I said was building another PC so wanted to still be able to use my original Windows 7 license. Once again, just because one can get the update free that doesn't make it the best option in every case.

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adrynalyne

I did question why every single person on Neowin seemed to be doing a update (and half of them bitching it wasn't working) and nobody was doing a new install which is a valid question.

People were being rude (starting with you) in their replies saying I must not know about the reset option even after I said was building another PC so wanted to still be able to use my original Windows 7 license. Once again, just because one can get the update free that doesn't make it the best option in every case.

 

How people react to you probably has a lot to do with how you have treated them in the past.

Now that the question as to why people are upgrading has been answered, we can all move on :)

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oldtimefighter

How people react to you probably has a lot to do with how you have treated them in the past.

Pot calling the kettle black...

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adrynalyne

Pot calling the kettle black...

I'm not the one acting innocent and wondering why people are rude.

 

Knowing full well you threatened me with physical violence in the past; I'll probably never warm up to you.  Don't ask me to prove it, it was deleted by a moderator.

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PGHammer

Doesn't anyone do clean installs anymore? What ever happened to that when a new Windows version came out it was time to start fresh, backup your data, format, and reinstall your apps? My desktop machine had ran Windows 7 (which I bought) so I qualified for the free upgrade but I bought the full version of Windows Home for it anyway on launch day. A problem free new install and will have no issues transferring it over to the new PC I will be building at the end of the year. I will still have my old product key so this box will go back to Windows 7.

All the stories of people struggling with upgrading their computers is painful to watch. Free is nice but $119 is a small price to pay for convenience with no questions about one's licensing status. It helps I never bothered with Windows 8 so it's been like 6 years since had to pay for Windows.  

Because installing (or reinstalling) old software is a real PITA, especially when it's gigabytes of 7-era or older software.  I went through it once when I upgraded the refurb (that Mom's AIO replaced) from 7 HP x32 to 7 HP x64 (crossgrade - not upgrade), and, given that OS upgrades are far less fraught than they were with XP and earlier, doing an in-place upgrade is far easier; in fact, with Windows 10, for the first time really ever, upgrades - not clean installs - are the default.If you are running 7 or later, unless your hardware is extremely out of date, or the OS itself is horribly configured, upgrades - even from 7 - make WAY too much sense.

 

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PGHammer

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

Why couldn't they?  Other than licensing METHOD, there is exactly zero difference between MAK SKUs and their retail counterparts, and, except for Enterprise (which didn't go retail until 8), they are identical otherwise.

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PGHammer

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer 2 monitor workstation

5) All in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement 4 monitor Workstation

Computer i've upgrade just to cash in on the free upgrade but they aren't being used

1) Dell Core 2 Mini PC

2) Dell Inspiron 531S

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) Intel NUC Celeron viewer machine for Secure Cam feed over TV in living room

2) Intel NUC Celeron machine (Spare not being used)

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

6) PC in theater

7) Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

8) 2nd Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

9) 7 Core 2 duo desktop PC's because they are all spare PC's I got from a dentist office and they all have Vista Business stickers :(

4.  Unless this laptop is running Vista or earlier (and, depending on the GPU, possibly even then), you may want to upgrade if it is currently running 7 - I actually have one Vista-era notebook running 10 Pro with a far-older GPU (it's using the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter driver - the GPU in it is THAT old).

9.  The OS is the ONLY flaw on those (quite possibly literally); Windows 10 runs quite fine on Core 2-era PCs (even those with the AMD equivalents, in terms of age).  Rememberi the two notebooks I have are from the Core 2 era, and the Dead Hardware Express desktop is a dead-stock Q6600; therefore, the CPU is not the issue.  You will have (other than the OS) at worst three possible problems; GPU age, HDD age/size, and RAM capacity.  Fortunately, they are desktops - you won't have the issues you would have with portables of the same age..

GPU - as long as they aren't built-in or AGP-bus, upgrade, upgrade, upgrade.  PCI Express-bus GPUs aren't that hard to find, while suitable PCI-bus upgrades aren't that much harder.

HDD - the choice is platter or SSD; which depends on your budget.  Regardless of which way you go, it will almost certainly firewall your SATA port; therefore budget - not size - is the choice-determinant.

RAM capacity - THE issue in hardware of this age.  DDR2 (not DDR3) is the typical RAM type in desktops of this age; worse, you are mostly limited to two RAM sticks in corporate-stable desktops (Intel's G3x and G4x are the stars of corporate-stable;G3x typically has four RAM slots; however, G41 typically has but two).  Use 2GB of DDR2-800 per RAM slot (regardless of whether two slots or four), PNY is a safe choice here (not pricey, either), and 4 GB is a sensible loadout for any Windows 10 mainstream PC - it's the loadout of the development notebook AND the DHE.

 

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freak180

Why couldn't they?  Other than licensing METHOD, there is exactly zero difference between MAK SKUs and their retail counterparts, and, except for Enterprise (which didn't go retail until 8), they are identical otherwise.

Just a lot of people saying it wasnt possible so I had to try it out for myself

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Noir Angel

Doesn't anyone do clean installs anymore? What ever happened to that when a new Windows version came out it was time to start fresh, backup your data, format, and reinstall your apps? My desktop machine had ran Windows 7 (which I bought) so I qualified for the free upgrade but I bought the full version of Windows Home for it anyway on launch day. A problem free new install and will have no issues transferring it over to the new PC I will be building at the end of the year. I will still have my old product key so this box will go back to Windows 7.

All the stories of people struggling with upgrading their computers is painful to watch. Free is nice but $119 is a small price to pay for convenience with no questions about one's licensing status. It helps I never bothered with Windows 8 so it's been like 6 years since had to pay for Windows.  

I upgraded mine first to take advantage of the free activation, but I have since carried out a clean install.

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JonathanVP

I did an upgrade to Windows 10 RTM to all the computer in my house: 4 desktops and 2 laptops ranging from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 without any problems.

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DConnell

I'm sort of my families IT person and in the last couple days I've done

3 Desktop towers

2 All=in-ones

2 tablets

 

What have you done?

I've got my test laptop running the Insider Preview still. No other machines yet, as I'm not thrilled with the changes.

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oldtimefighter

I'm not the one acting innocent and wondering why people are rude.

 

Knowing full well you threatened me with physical violence in the past; I'll probably never warm up to you.  Don't ask me to prove it, it was deleted by a moderator.

Yeah, after you were making personal attacks toward me. All I said is you wouldn't ever say that to my face cause you know what would happen to you. Don't twist it around...

Please get your last words in as I am done.

 

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oldtimefighter

Because installing (or reinstalling) old software is a real PITA, especially when it's gigabytes of 7-era or older software.  I went through it once when I upgraded the refurb (that Mom's AIO replaced) from 7 HP x32 to 7 HP x64 (crossgrade - not upgrade), and, given that OS upgrades are far less fraught than they were with XP and earlier, doing an in-place upgrade is far easier; in fact, with Windows 10, for the first time really ever, upgrades - not clean installs - are the default.If you are running 7 or later, unless your hardware is extremely out of date, or the OS itself is horribly configured, upgrades - even from 7 - make WAY too much sense.

 

Installing Windows 10 was a good time to take an inventory of my applications and install fresh the ones I wanted to keep and were compatibility. Sorry, a fresh OS install is always going to be better then a upgrade (but may be fine for a regular user). Upgrades are far less fraught now? Did you just get back from vacation or something? There has been literally 100's of comments on Neowin alone with upgrade issues. Once again, I did say it had been six years since my last OS install on that machine so doing a new install is no problem.

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BoondockSaint

I've done my Surface Pro 3 and my Intel NUC based media center PC, both are working great.

I am holding off on doing the upgrade on my desktop as I have far too many work tools installed to risk running into an issue right now - too many projects open for clients. I also do gaming on this machine, so I would rather wait until nVidia drivers have a few more releases under their belt and game devs push patches through Steam for any issues.

I would like to have 8 on the desktop, but not willing to risk losing time if something doesn't work correctly while I am in the middle of work for clients.

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+warwagon
HDD - the choice is platter or SSD; which depends on your budget.  Regardless of which way you go, it will almost certainly firewall your SATA port; therefore budget - not size - is the choice-determinant.

Every single machine listed in that list has an SSD in it. In fact I only recently did an upgrade on a spinning drive and it was for a customer.

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JustGeorge

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

As can Win7 Refurbished keys

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techbeck

So, just upgraded a DEll e6410 laptop.  Only a few drivers were not found.  Had to use Windows update to find the NVIDIA drivers as the generic drivers were installed.  USH Drivers were not installed but the Windows 7 driver worked.  Same for the STMicroelectonics free fall sensor.  Kind of surprised the Win7 drivers worked so something to think about if anyone else has any driver related issues.

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PGHammer

Every single machine listed in that list has an SSD in it. In fact I only recently did an upgrade on a spinning drive and it was for a customer.

The Insider PCS (one desktop and two notebooks) and Mom's AIO - which is all the PCs in the house that are eligible.  Not one problem with any of them; not even the oldest notebook.

Followup - I'll be either upgrading or clean-installing any eligible PC that the owner gives consent to due ENTIRELY to the success with my own PCs and Mom's AIO - none of my PCs has an SSD; Mom's AIO has Intel RST (but also has a platter drive).  HP's Windows 10 Upgrade Checklist - yes; there is one - specifically pointed to a required upgrade to RST prior to upgrading.

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PGHammer

So, just upgraded a DEll e6410 laptop.  Only a few drivers were not found.  Had to use Windows update to find the NVIDIA drivers as the generic drivers were installed.  USH Drivers were not installed but the Windows 7 driver worked.  Same for the STMicroelectonics free fall sensor.  Kind of surprised the Win7 drivers worked so something to think about if anyone else has any driver related issues.

7 and later divers are fine; it's Vista-era drivers and older that are problematical - far too many are based on XP drivers.  Driver hacks are also a problem (my oldest notebook requires a hack to use the display's proper resolution due to the GPU's age).

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DavidM

Zero, One got "upgraded" but was quickly restored to it's original 7 and all the other machines got their updates cancelled.

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      Battery life on this laptop is phenomenal too. I can easily get over a dozen hours of battery life on here, with the battery slider on one notch above battery saver and the screen on about 25% brightness. Dell has been making some bold battery life claims, and it's nice seeing it deliver.

      For benchmarks, I used PCMark 8, PCMark 10, Geekbench, and Cinebench.

      Latitude 7320
      Core i7-1185G7 Latitude 7310
      Core i7-10610U XPS 13
      Core i7-1065G7 PCMark 8: Home 4,478 3,639 3,899 PCMark 8: Creative 4,655 3,693 4,253 PCMark 8: Work 4,099 3,845 3,797 PCMark 10 4,743 4,253 4,402 Geekbench 1,540 / 5,181 Cinebench 1,230 / 4,428
      As you can see, there's a big improvement over the last generation.

      Conclusion
      While all of the changes that Dell made on this generation seem small, they're meaningful changes. I love that there are charging ports on either side for convenience, and of course, the FHD webcam is a must in 2021. Seriously, the amount of companies that have ignored that just baffles me.



      My biggest complaint is that it doesn't have a 4K option again. This is something that's competing with the EliteBook 800 and ThinkPad T-series of the world, just like the Latitude 9000 should be competing with EliteBook 1000 and ThinkPad X1. A 4K option would be nice.

      Of course, that would affect the sweet, sweet battery life that I'm getting from this thing. Seriously, it's wild. It's hard to not look at the Dell Latitude 7320 and call it the ultimate working from home PC, because it checks those boxes. It has the proper webcam, which is a rarity, and it's also light and small. It's easy to work from anywhere in your home, whether that's at a desk or on the couch.

      This really is just such a good PC, and this year's improvements are really meaningful. If you want to check it out on Dell.com, you can find it here.

    • By Sszecret
      Microsoft Weekly: New Surface devices, April Patch Tuesday, and game updates
      by Florin Bodnarescu



      In the last seven days, Microsoft unveiled its latest Surface Laptop (and a number of other peripherals), acquired Nuance Communications for a cool $19.7 billion, and even pushed out a number of updates for Windows and first-party games. You can find info about that, as well as much more below, in your Microsoft digest for the week of April 11 - 17.

      New Surface devices


      After a number of leaks, and even a teaser video from Microsoft itself, the fourth iteration of the Surface Laptop was unveiled earlier this week.

      Swapping out the Cobalt Blue variant for an Ice Blue color, the Laptop 4 now also includes AMD CPUs for both its 13.5 and 15-inch models (namely the Ryzen 4000 generation), as well as 11th-gen Intel Core CPUs. The device starts at $999, and has begun shipping since April 15, and in case you want to check out the full range of options available, have a look here.

      The company also unveiled a number of peripherals, including the Surface Headphones 2+ for business (priced at $299 and available later this month), and the Modern USB Headset and Modern Wireless Headset, priced at $49.99 and $99.99 – arriving in June. Also arriving in June are the Modern USB-C Speaker ($99.99) and the Modern Webcam, the latter of which supports 1080p 30FPS video output, has a 78-degree FOV, and is priced at $69.99.

      Last but not least, the Surface Duo was also mentioned, with Microsoft confirming that it’s headed for more European markets. Specifically, it’ll be available in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland, though only for business and education customers.

      April Patch Tuesday


      Since this week was the second Tuesday of the month, Microsoft pushed out its by now traditional set of Patch Tuesday updates. If you’re on Windows 10, these are:

      May 2020 Update / October 2020 Update (2004, 20H2): KB5001330, builds 19041.928 / 19042.928 – contains updates that improve basic Windows operation secuirity, as well as enhance security when using input devices like mice, keyboards, or pens. November 2019 Update (1909): KB5001337, build 18363.1500 – changelog is identical to the version above. October 2018 Update (1809): KB5001342, build 17763.1879 – supported for Enterprise, Education SKUs. April 2018 Update (1803): KB5001339, build 17134.2145 – supported for Enterprise, Education SKUs. Anniversary Update (1607): KB5001347, build 14393.4350 – supported in the Long-Term Servicing Channel. Windows 10 RTM (1507): KB5001340, build 10240.18906 - supported in the Long-Term Servicing Channel. Windows 8.1 and 7 aren’t forgotten either, with the former still in extended support until 2023, and the latter being kept alive in the business environment via Extended Security Updates. As such, here’s what folks running those operating systems need to be on the lookout for:

      Windows 8.1: KB5001382, KB5001393 (security-only) – this monthly rollup includes some time zone and security enhancements, while still containing the now traditional Cluster Shared Volume error „STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)” in terms of known issues. Windows 7: KB5001335, KB5001392 (security-only) – contains similar time zone and security enhancements to Windows 8.1, and has the identical known issue. Naturally, beyond the regular updates, Insiders in the Dev channel also got a new build to play with, namely 21359. Beyond its laundry list of fixes, it introduces a brand new option in the Power menu, which allows the system to restart your apps after signing in. Essentially, this works in a similar way to the ability to recover the last session in browsers, only this one applies to open apps at the time of restarting the system.

      For fans of Timeline - the feature in Windows 10 that allows you to view your activity history (more or less a giant “recent files” screen -, there is some bad news. While the capability will remain functional for local activity, cross-device syncing is being removed.

      Finally, in case the rumored Sun Valley UI refresh has piqued your interest, check out this concept which brings File Explorer a little more in-line with the Redmond giant’s vision. Sure, Windows 10 may never look like this, but it’s a fun little bit of speculation if you will, at least until Sun Valley arrives via 21H2 later in the year (assuming there’s no delays).

      Game updates
      This week was all about game updates on the Microsoft side.



      On one hand, World Update IV dropped for Flight Simulator, featuring enhancements to the scenery in Western Europe. Included in the update are enhancements to regions in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg, covering cities, airports, landmarks, and much more.

      Sea of Thieves players were also greeted by the start of Season Two, adding Trade Routes, the ability to purchase resources directly from outposts, the addition of 100 more unlockable items to the free battle pass, and so much more.

      For folks eagerly awaiting the Caves & Cliffs update that’s coming to Minecraft, there’s some interesting news. Mojang Studios has decided to split the update in two, with the mobs, items, and blocks arriving in the summer (the original target of the bigger update), and the world generation upgrades landing during the holiday season.

      Those who enjoyed InXile’s latest release, Wasteland 3, will be happy to hear that the game is in fact getting its first expansion, The Battle of Steeltown. Adding a new location, new mechanics, more enemies, weapons, armor, combat and gear scaling and more, the expansion drops June 3 across Steam, GOG, Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and (now) current-gen consoles for $13.99. Game Pass subscribers get at 10% discount when purchasing the expansion.

      And while we’re on the subject of Game Pass and deals, you are now able to download Game Pass games using Amazon Alexa, while the ever-present Deals with Gold are yet again out in full force with The Division, ABZU, Apex Legends, Battlefield 1, and more receiving respectable discounts.

      Last, but most certainly not least, if you’re an Xbox Live Gold subscriber, Uprising and Truck Racing Championship are now free to claim, with Vikings: Wolves of Midgard still being available to grab as well, at least until April 30.

      Dev channel
      Edge is set to get a new Workspaces feature, now available in the Canary channel. Additionally, Edge Dev build 91.0.852.0 is now out, adding Password Monitor for everybody, while the stable channel has gotten version 90, and the Canary variant on Android has received an update too. Chat bubble support is planned for Teams, as is support for electronically-signed approvals. All major Microsoft services will exclusively use SHA-2 starting next month. PowerToys pre-release v0.36 is now out, with a video conference mute tool. The Remote Desktop app has been updated with support for Apple Silicon devices. Logging off
      We end the column with some Exchange, acquisition, and podcast news.



      We’ll begin with Exchange, as Microsoft has released yet another set of security updates for the ever-unfolding Exchange Server vulnerabilities. This latest round of patches comes as a result of an NSA report and, for those not aware, is meant to further protect against the state-sponsored group attacks on on-prem Exchange Server instances, which started surfacing last month.

      Moving on to acquisition news, Microsoft was rumored to be in talks with Nuance Communications, the company behind the underlying technology for Apple’s Siri digital assistant for a buyout. The firm's speech recognition system, Dragon, is used in a number of fields including healthcare, legal, law enforcement, and financial services.

      While the initial rumor pinned the sum of the buyout at $16 billion, the Redmond giant came out not long after to confirm that it was indeed acquiring Nuance, but for $19.7 billion. This is because it’s also taking on the firm’s debt.

      Last but not least, feel free to check out the latest episode of the Neowin Podcast, in which Rich and Joao discuss the shuttering of LG’s phone business, what’s next for Windows 10, and indeed what’s next for Rich Woods, as he will be leaving Neowin. You can check out the podcast at this link.

      Missed any of the previous columns? Be sure to have a look right here.



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