I've upgraded 7 machines to Windows 10. How many have you?


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+warwagon

Where's the poll?

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+warwagon

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer 2 monitor workstation

5) All in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement 4 monitor Workstation

Computer i've upgrade just to cash in on the free upgrade but they aren't being used

1) Dell Core 2 Mini PC

2) Dell Inspiron 531S

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) Intel NUC Celeron viewer machine for Secure Cam feed over TV in living room

2) Intel NUC Celeron machine (Spare not being used)

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

6) PC in theater

7) Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

8) 2nd Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

9) 7 Core 2 duo desktop PC's because they are all spare PC's I got from a dentist office and they all have Vista Business stickers :(

Edited by warwagon
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JustGeorge

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer

5) A in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement Workstation

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) VNC viewer machine

2) PC in theater

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

You have a lot of ######, Mr. Wagon.

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DirtyLarry

Zero point Zero.

Never got the notification I could upgrade. I know I can force it to upgrade but really am in no rush. My only Windows PC runs like a well oiled machine and I want to keep it that way.

So I might not even take the plunge whenever I do get the notification it is ready. Really all depends on what type of mood I am in.

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freak180

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

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oldtimefighter
 

People are hung up on your first question, and its why they are answering because from the question it appears you don't understand why others are not doing a clean install.

 

I did question why every single person on Neowin seemed to be doing a update (and half of them bitching it wasn't working) and nobody was doing a new install which is a valid question.

People were being rude (starting with you) in their replies saying I must not know about the reset option even after I said was building another PC so wanted to still be able to use my original Windows 7 license. Once again, just because one can get the update free that doesn't make it the best option in every case.

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adrynalyne

I did question why every single person on Neowin seemed to be doing a update (and half of them bitching it wasn't working) and nobody was doing a new install which is a valid question.

People were being rude (starting with you) in their replies saying I must not know about the reset option even after I said was building another PC so wanted to still be able to use my original Windows 7 license. Once again, just because one can get the update free that doesn't make it the best option in every case.

 

How people react to you probably has a lot to do with how you have treated them in the past.

Now that the question as to why people are upgrading has been answered, we can all move on :)

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oldtimefighter

How people react to you probably has a lot to do with how you have treated them in the past.

Pot calling the kettle black...

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adrynalyne

Pot calling the kettle black...

I'm not the one acting innocent and wondering why people are rude.

 

Knowing full well you threatened me with physical violence in the past; I'll probably never warm up to you.  Don't ask me to prove it, it was deleted by a moderator.

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PGHammer

Doesn't anyone do clean installs anymore? What ever happened to that when a new Windows version came out it was time to start fresh, backup your data, format, and reinstall your apps? My desktop machine had ran Windows 7 (which I bought) so I qualified for the free upgrade but I bought the full version of Windows Home for it anyway on launch day. A problem free new install and will have no issues transferring it over to the new PC I will be building at the end of the year. I will still have my old product key so this box will go back to Windows 7.

All the stories of people struggling with upgrading their computers is painful to watch. Free is nice but $119 is a small price to pay for convenience with no questions about one's licensing status. It helps I never bothered with Windows 8 so it's been like 6 years since had to pay for Windows.  

Because installing (or reinstalling) old software is a real PITA, especially when it's gigabytes of 7-era or older software.  I went through it once when I upgraded the refurb (that Mom's AIO replaced) from 7 HP x32 to 7 HP x64 (crossgrade - not upgrade), and, given that OS upgrades are far less fraught than they were with XP and earlier, doing an in-place upgrade is far easier; in fact, with Windows 10, for the first time really ever, upgrades - not clean installs - are the default.If you are running 7 or later, unless your hardware is extremely out of date, or the OS itself is horribly configured, upgrades - even from 7 - make WAY too much sense.

 

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PGHammer

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

Why couldn't they?  Other than licensing METHOD, there is exactly zero difference between MAK SKUs and their retail counterparts, and, except for Enterprise (which didn't go retail until 8), they are identical otherwise.

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PGHammer

My parents laptop and their iMac 27 inch I gave them

My Computers I've upgraded

1) Nobilis i7 laptop

2) Samsung i5 Laptop

3) Theater PC in living room

4) Couch computer 2 monitor workstation

5) All in one computer on kitchen table

6) W500 Tablet

7) Stream 8 tablet

8) Macbook Pro i7

9) Basement 4 monitor Workstation

Computer i've upgrade just to cash in on the free upgrade but they aren't being used

1) Dell Core 2 Mini PC

2) Dell Inspiron 531S

Computers I don't have it running on.

1) Intel NUC Celeron viewer machine for Secure Cam feed over TV in living room

2) Intel NUC Celeron machine (Spare not being used)

3) Server

4) lenovo Laptop Core 2

5) Quickbooks machine

6) PC in theater

7) Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

8) 2nd Computer on repair bench because it's used for cloning PC's and repairing fixing bad sectors on hard drives and retrieving data off drives.

9) 7 Core 2 duo desktop PC's because they are all spare PC's I got from a dentist office and they all have Vista Business stickers :(

4.  Unless this laptop is running Vista or earlier (and, depending on the GPU, possibly even then), you may want to upgrade if it is currently running 7 - I actually have one Vista-era notebook running 10 Pro with a far-older GPU (it's using the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter driver - the GPU in it is THAT old).

9.  The OS is the ONLY flaw on those (quite possibly literally); Windows 10 runs quite fine on Core 2-era PCs (even those with the AMD equivalents, in terms of age).  Rememberi the two notebooks I have are from the Core 2 era, and the Dead Hardware Express desktop is a dead-stock Q6600; therefore, the CPU is not the issue.  You will have (other than the OS) at worst three possible problems; GPU age, HDD age/size, and RAM capacity.  Fortunately, they are desktops - you won't have the issues you would have with portables of the same age..

GPU - as long as they aren't built-in or AGP-bus, upgrade, upgrade, upgrade.  PCI Express-bus GPUs aren't that hard to find, while suitable PCI-bus upgrades aren't that much harder.

HDD - the choice is platter or SSD; which depends on your budget.  Regardless of which way you go, it will almost certainly firewall your SATA port; therefore budget - not size - is the choice-determinant.

RAM capacity - THE issue in hardware of this age.  DDR2 (not DDR3) is the typical RAM type in desktops of this age; worse, you are mostly limited to two RAM sticks in corporate-stable desktops (Intel's G3x and G4x are the stars of corporate-stable;G3x typically has four RAM slots; however, G41 typically has but two).  Use 2GB of DDR2-800 per RAM slot (regardless of whether two slots or four), PNY is a safe choice here (not pricey, either), and 4 GB is a sensible loadout for any Windows 10 mainstream PC - it's the loadout of the development notebook AND the DHE.

 

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freak180

Why couldn't they?  Other than licensing METHOD, there is exactly zero difference between MAK SKUs and their retail counterparts, and, except for Enterprise (which didn't go retail until 8), they are identical otherwise.

Just a lot of people saying it wasnt possible so I had to try it out for myself

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Noir Angel

Doesn't anyone do clean installs anymore? What ever happened to that when a new Windows version came out it was time to start fresh, backup your data, format, and reinstall your apps? My desktop machine had ran Windows 7 (which I bought) so I qualified for the free upgrade but I bought the full version of Windows Home for it anyway on launch day. A problem free new install and will have no issues transferring it over to the new PC I will be building at the end of the year. I will still have my old product key so this box will go back to Windows 7.

All the stories of people struggling with upgrading their computers is painful to watch. Free is nice but $119 is a small price to pay for convenience with no questions about one's licensing status. It helps I never bothered with Windows 8 so it's been like 6 years since had to pay for Windows.  

I upgraded mine first to take advantage of the free activation, but I have since carried out a clean install.

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JonathanVP

I did an upgrade to Windows 10 RTM to all the computer in my house: 4 desktops and 2 laptops ranging from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 without any problems.

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DConnell

I'm sort of my families IT person and in the last couple days I've done

3 Desktop towers

2 All=in-ones

2 tablets

 

What have you done?

I've got my test laptop running the Insider Preview still. No other machines yet, as I'm not thrilled with the changes.

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oldtimefighter

I'm not the one acting innocent and wondering why people are rude.

 

Knowing full well you threatened me with physical violence in the past; I'll probably never warm up to you.  Don't ask me to prove it, it was deleted by a moderator.

Yeah, after you were making personal attacks toward me. All I said is you wouldn't ever say that to my face cause you know what would happen to you. Don't twist it around...

Please get your last words in as I am done.

 

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oldtimefighter

Because installing (or reinstalling) old software is a real PITA, especially when it's gigabytes of 7-era or older software.  I went through it once when I upgraded the refurb (that Mom's AIO replaced) from 7 HP x32 to 7 HP x64 (crossgrade - not upgrade), and, given that OS upgrades are far less fraught than they were with XP and earlier, doing an in-place upgrade is far easier; in fact, with Windows 10, for the first time really ever, upgrades - not clean installs - are the default.If you are running 7 or later, unless your hardware is extremely out of date, or the OS itself is horribly configured, upgrades - even from 7 - make WAY too much sense.

 

Installing Windows 10 was a good time to take an inventory of my applications and install fresh the ones I wanted to keep and were compatibility. Sorry, a fresh OS install is always going to be better then a upgrade (but may be fine for a regular user). Upgrades are far less fraught now? Did you just get back from vacation or something? There has been literally 100's of comments on Neowin alone with upgrade issues. Once again, I did say it had been six years since my last OS install on that machine so doing a new install is no problem.

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BoondockSaint

I've done my Surface Pro 3 and my Intel NUC based media center PC, both are working great.

I am holding off on doing the upgrade on my desktop as I have far too many work tools installed to risk running into an issue right now - too many projects open for clients. I also do gaming on this machine, so I would rather wait until nVidia drivers have a few more releases under their belt and game devs push patches through Steam for any issues.

I would like to have 8 on the desktop, but not willing to risk losing time if something doesn't work correctly while I am in the middle of work for clients.

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+warwagon
HDD - the choice is platter or SSD; which depends on your budget.  Regardless of which way you go, it will almost certainly firewall your SATA port; therefore budget - not size - is the choice-determinant.

Every single machine listed in that list has an SSD in it. In fact I only recently did an upgrade on a spinning drive and it was for a customer.

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JustGeorge

Btw WIndows 7 pro Mak keys can upgrade to 10

As can Win7 Refurbished keys

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techbeck

So, just upgraded a DEll e6410 laptop.  Only a few drivers were not found.  Had to use Windows update to find the NVIDIA drivers as the generic drivers were installed.  USH Drivers were not installed but the Windows 7 driver worked.  Same for the STMicroelectonics free fall sensor.  Kind of surprised the Win7 drivers worked so something to think about if anyone else has any driver related issues.

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PGHammer

Every single machine listed in that list has an SSD in it. In fact I only recently did an upgrade on a spinning drive and it was for a customer.

The Insider PCS (one desktop and two notebooks) and Mom's AIO - which is all the PCs in the house that are eligible.  Not one problem with any of them; not even the oldest notebook.

Followup - I'll be either upgrading or clean-installing any eligible PC that the owner gives consent to due ENTIRELY to the success with my own PCs and Mom's AIO - none of my PCs has an SSD; Mom's AIO has Intel RST (but also has a platter drive).  HP's Windows 10 Upgrade Checklist - yes; there is one - specifically pointed to a required upgrade to RST prior to upgrading.

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PGHammer

So, just upgraded a DEll e6410 laptop.  Only a few drivers were not found.  Had to use Windows update to find the NVIDIA drivers as the generic drivers were installed.  USH Drivers were not installed but the Windows 7 driver worked.  Same for the STMicroelectonics free fall sensor.  Kind of surprised the Win7 drivers worked so something to think about if anyone else has any driver related issues.

7 and later divers are fine; it's Vista-era drivers and older that are problematical - far too many are based on XP drivers.  Driver hacks are also a problem (my oldest notebook requires a hack to use the display's proper resolution due to the GPU's age).

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DavidM

Zero, One got "upgraded" but was quickly restored to it's original 7 and all the other machines got their updates cancelled.

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