I've upgraded 7 machines to Windows 10. How many have you?


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DefyTheOutcome

Two machines, both clean install

- The Home Desktop at home: the only thing missing is some sort of IR remote control driver I did not even know exist and I really do not care about.

- The workstation at work: still a few things missing but system is operational and I barely see the difference in my daily routine

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madd-hatter

0.

People who adapt new technologies usually get burned. I'm in no rush.

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BoondockSaint

I took the plunge today and upgraded my work/games machine. I had one of those accidental purchases... walking past a computer shop and got tempted into getting a better SSD than my current one. That was as good excuse as any to move that machine over.

Upgraded, then clean installed. So far, everything is running very smoothly. That makes all 3 of my machines upgraded.

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freak180

0.

People who adapt new technologies usually get burned. I'm in no rush.

pfff. Keep on living in fear

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ZakO

Four. No problems with any of them so far, I did a fresh install after upgrade on all but one. 

> New Desktop (z97 - 4790k), old desktop (p45 - Q9550), rMBP, old laptop

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+xrobwx71

3 desktops at work and 1 @ home. No issues to speak of. Upgraded these all on July 30th with the media creation tool.

 

 

 

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PGHammer

Zero, One got "upgraded" but was quickly restored to it's original 7 and all the other machines got their updates cancelled.

Okay - what happened?  Hardware issues, application issues or comfort/user-related issues?  I don't ding or criticize because of user-comfort-related issues - that sort of thing has happened.  I personally reported one hardware ding - on my oldest notebook - however, the ding is not damaging enough to force a rollback.  However, the application/software issues - including incompabilities - need disclosure, so they can be addressed by whoever needs to.

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techbeck

Upgraded a SP1 and SP2.  Was surprised that their were drivers Win10 couldnt install and that Windows Update did not have them either.  Had to DL the Win10 drivers from MS and update them manually.   Also, the SP1 had my works custom software load and Win10 would not upgrade until I set the tablet back to factory defaults.

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adrynalyne

0.

People who adapt new technologies usually get burned. I'm in no rush.

How is that abacus treating you?

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DavidM

Okay - what happened?  Hardware issues, application issues or comfort/user-related issues?  I don't ding or criticize because of user-comfort-related issues - that sort of thing has happened.  I personally reported one hardware ding - on my oldest notebook - however, the ding is not damaging enough to force a rollback.  However, the application/software issues - including incompabilities - need disclosure, so they can be addressed by whoever needs to.

Windows 10 happened, between the privacy issues, forced updates, crappy start menu, p2p updates, the new tos that allows Microsoft to stop me from using any software they decide is "not legal" and their ability to break "unauthorized devices" any time they see fit. I think that's about it... no wait it's freaking ugly, it looks like a bad implementation of the Windows 3.1 theme. That start menu is a joke, so many design failures in such a small space, it boggles my mind. I can't believe that is the best they can do, are they even trying?

I thought they were serious about making the desktop their primary target, but nope, they keep on smashing their tablet ui into the desktop and coming up empty. I know they felt rushed, Win 8/8.1 was not going to be adopted like Win 7 was, and they realized they needed to fix it asap, but Win 10 is not the answer, and is a startling experience for anyone not following the development. Going from Aero to 10's "theme" is a truly harsh experience, my wife thought the install had broke when she saw the desktop finally boot up. She honestly ask, "Is it supposed to look like that?" I just shook my head and said yes.

TLDR; I think Microsoft rushed a product out to try and remove the stain that was Win 8/8.1 and failed.

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madd-hatter

How is that abacus treating you?

Reasonable response.

/s

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adrynalyne

Reasonable response.

/s

Thee is nothing wrong with being a luddite.

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Kudo

1 desktop and 1 laptop.

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sinetheo

0

Sticking with 8.1. I tried to put my main rig on 10 and WOW was it not ready. Very buggy and no placeholders for Onedrive on my limited SSD where I would copy is a no go. I can't change the color of the title bars. Edge is not ready and I am sure I would find other reasons.

I want to type a new one asking "Any holdouts sticking witih 8.1"? But that would get quite ugly here FAST. If it aint broke don't fix it seems to increase as us users get older. I want to try 10 but man I am dissapointed in the QA. Since MS laid off their QA and only focus on feedback and usage scenarios it showed.

I will probably upgrade next year when it is ready. It took XP a few years to be ready for the desktop

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sinetheo

Thee is nothing wrong with being a luddite.

1 desktop and 1 laptop.

How is that abacus treating you?

Funny one of my senior techs at worik has a dad who loves XP as the BEST OS EVER! He won't leave it and will fight and die protecting his Pentium IV with 512 megs of ram from the horrors of 7 and ribbons. What he has works so why should he change?

Oh but but it is out of date?! So what is wrong with an abacus? It works and some users have work to do and do not have time to have a whitish titlebar and unflexible buggy OS that is not finished yet when they have work to get done. Their phones on the other hand is what needs to be new with a higher priority. Face it the PC is now the mainframe in terms of excitement and is old crud and legacy for work. We love operating systems but I see nothing wrong with sticking with 8.1 until the 1st 2 updates are out to put placeholders back in Onedrive, add extensions in Edge, fix grpahical problems in ATI and Nvidia systems, have universal apps ready, colors again in Office 2016, and have all their printers, cams, and other devices ported over, and more importantly JUST WORK!

 

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Mockingbird

I've upgraded 999,999,993 PCs to Windows 10, therefore there must be at least a billion devices running Windows 10.

Is Microsoft going to throw a party?

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