Nasa Curiosity Probe finds life on Mars!


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+Anarkii

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IF YOU really want something, you can just will it into existence.

That seems to be the strategy of alien hunters who are convinced that the latest photos from NASA’s Curiosity rover show proof of alien life forms on the red planet.

Conspiracy theorists on UFO Sightings Daily have drawn people’s attention to a photo captured by the robotic explorer which they claim has visual anomalies that could prove the existence of “complex life on mars”.

However, they might have a loose interpretation of “complex life”, as they don’t really seem to be exhibiting it themselves. Seemingly clutching at straws, the post asserts that the photo shows a cloaked woman about 8-10 centimetres in height.

“The woman seems to have breasts ... indicated by the shadow on its chest. We also see two arms that are lighter in colour and what looks like a head with long hair. Its hard to tell if this is a living being, or a statue of a being from long ago,” wrote Scott C. Waring on the UFO dedicated website.

“This looks real. And it should concern every country in the world.”

Along with the woman, the site claims a dark, square-shaped image on the left of the photo “may” or “may not be” a building or an alien dwelling.

Despite the rather dubious nature of the speculation, the internet loves nothing more than the idea of an alien sighting.

Sauce: 

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/alien-hunters-are-certain-latest-curiosity-rover-photos-show-veiled-woman-on-mars/story-fnjwlcze-1227475453841

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+virtorio

It was Earth all along.

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DConnell

The structure on the left is clearly a manhole cover, allowing access to the advanced underground city the Martians have hidden from us for centuries. All the while preparing to launch their invasion fleet.

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FloatingFatMan

maybe it's just a ghost?

Or perhaps it's just a rock or shadow...

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HighwayGlider

They are saying that the woman has a height of 8-10cm? I got that right? Looks pretty much like cinderella with dirty clothes. Anyways, my pixels interpreting skills is saying that the structure on the left is clearly a tank. Maybe the game WoT is actually taking place real-time on mars? 

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DConnell

 

Or perhaps it's just a rock or shadow...

Now that's just crazy talk! :laugh:

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Arachno 1D

The artefact on the left is clearly an underground vent for the swamp gas and the other is a weathered miniature of the venus de milo

 

aphrodite-backside.jpg

 

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Kierax2016

Proof Celine Dion is a martian alien, the square looking building is the control room for incoming information from Earths photocopiers detailing our research into goldfish.

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DConnell

Proof Celine Dion is a martian alien, the square looking building is the control room for incoming information from Earths photocopiers detailing our research into goldfish.

I don't know what you're smoking, but you need to share. :laugh:

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+RNDM_STRNGR

I don't know what you're smoking, but you need to share. :laugh:

you know EXACTLY what he is smoking :p

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