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Miscellaneous Launches and Payloads (updates)

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Draggendrop    5,748

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,748

Launch Schedule...busy 2 days...

 

Quote

Dec. 18   Falcon 9 • GPS 3-01

Launch window: 1411-1435 GMT (9:11-9:35 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. Delayed from May 3 and late 2017. Switched from a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket. The second GPS 3-series satellite will now launch on a Delta 4. Delayed from September and October. Delayed from Dec. 15. [Nov. 21]

 

Dec. 18   Soyuz • CSO 1

Launch time: 1637:14 GMT (11:37:14 a.m. EST)
Launch site: ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana

An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS20, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry into polar orbit the first Composante Spatiale Optique military reconnaissance satellite for CNES and DGA, the French defense procurement agency. The CSO 1 satellite is the first of three new-generation high-resolution optical imaging satellites for the French military, replacing the Helios 2 spy satellite series. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. [Dec. 13]

 

Dec. 18/19   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: 0157 GMT on 19th (8:57 p.m. EST; 5:57 p.m. PST on 18th)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. [Dec. 13]

 

Dec. 19   GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 7A

Launch time: Approx. 1030 GMT (5:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), designated GSLV-F11, will launch the GSAT 7A communications satellite for the Indian Air Force. Delayed from Dec. 14. [Dec. 13]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

and Blue Origin...which posted their schedule too late for this listing...

 

 

 

---------------------------------------------------------

 

SOYUZ FLIGHT VS20 with CSO-1

 

Quote

For its 11th and final launch of the year – and the third with the Soyuz medium launcher — Arianespace will send the CSO-1 Earth observation satellite, intended for defense and security applications, into Sun-synchronous orbit for the French CNES (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales) space agency and the DGA (Direction générale de l’armement) defense procurement agency on behalf of the French Ministry of Defense.

 

This also will be the 20th mission carried out by Soyuz since it began operating at the Guiana Space Center (CSG) in October 2011.

 

With this latest launch at the service of France’s defense requirements, as well as for the capacity needs of several partner countries, Arianespace once again guarantees French and European autonomous access to space – a strategic priority, and a key element for sovereignty.

 

cso-1-1024x807.png

CSO-1

 

Quote

CSO-1 is the first satellite of the Optical Space Component (CSO – Composante Spatiale Optique) program, a constellation of three satellites dedicated to Earth observation for defense and security. They will be placed into polar orbit at different altitudes, and will carry out two different missions: reconnaissance for CSO-1 and CSO-3, and identification for CSO-2.

 

The French CNES space agency is delegated as the contracting authority for the Optical Space Component (CSO) program and its mission ground segment, as well as being the overall system co-architect. CNES also is responsible for orbital positioning, in-orbit acceptance testing and satellite operation. France’s DGA defense procurement agency is contracting authority for the construction and through-life maintenance of the user ground segment, and will serve as the interface between the sensors deployed in space and the operators. The French armed forces headquarters is the operating authority for CSO.

 

The successor to the Helios 1 and 2 systems, CSO will address France and Europe’s operational needs for global intelligence and strategic surveillance, knowledge of the geographic environment and support for operational deployments.

VS-20 press kit for CSO-1

 

more info at the link...

http://www.arianespace.com/mission/ariane-flight-vs20/

 

----------------------------------------------------

ISRO

 

 

 

 

 

ISRO mission site for Gsat7A

 

great payload images at the above link...😎

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Draggendrop    5,748

 

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,748
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Flight #VS20: #Soyuz with CSO-1 > 24-hour delay due to weather conditions. Read the press release:

https://twitter.com/Arianespace/status/1075020170127728640

 

-----------------------

 

Quote

Due to unfavorable high-altitude wind conditions above the Guiana Space Center, Arianespace’s VS20 mission – initially scheduled for today, December 18 – has been postponed by 24 hours.

 

The Soyuz launch vehicle and its CSO-1 spacecraft payload are in a stable and safe condition.

 

The new targeted launch date is December 19 at exactly:

 

11:37:14 a.m., in Washington, D.C.

13:37:14 p.m., in Kourou, French Guiana

16:37:14, Universal Time (UTC)

17:37:14 p.m., in Paris

19:37:14 p.m., in Moscou

01:37:14 a.m., in Tokyo on December 20, 2018.

http://www.arianespace.com/press-release/flight-vs20-soyuz-with-cso-1-24-hour-delay-due-to-weather-conditions/

 

--------------------------------------

 

Quote

New T-0 of 9:34 EST, 14:34 UTC, to account for upper level winds. Launch webcast will go live about 15 minutes before liftoff → http://spacex.com/webcast

https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1075020725545689088

 

With the time change, Blue Origin launches first by a few minutes...if no holds...and they have usually had holds...

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Beittil    584

And since then Soyuz and New Shepard postponed to tomorrow 😛

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Draggendrop    5,748

 

I'll have to clean the launch order mess later tonoght when it clears up with confirmations of launch dates...

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Draggendrop    5,748
Quote

Dec. 18/19   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: 0157 GMT on 19th (8:57 p.m. EST; 5:57 p.m. PST on 18th)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. [Dec. 13]

 

Dec. 19   GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 7A

Launch time: 1040 GMT (5:40 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), designated GSLV-F11, will launch the GSAT 7A communications satellite for the Indian Air Force. Delayed from Dec. 14. [Dec. 18]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,748

Now that Tuesday turned into launch day from wally world....

 

Next schedule...tomorrow...

 

Quote

Dec. 19   GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 7A

Launch time: 1040 GMT (5:40 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), designated GSLV-F11, will launch the GSAT 7A communications satellite for the Indian Air Force. Delayed from Dec. 14. [Dec. 18]

 

Dec. 19   Falcon 9 • GPS 3 SV01

Launch window: 1407-1433 GMT (9:07-9:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. Delayed from May 3 and late 2017. Switched from a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket. The second GPS 3-series satellite will now launch on a Delta 4. Delayed from September and October. Delayed from Dec. 15. Scrubbed on Dec. 18. [Dec. 18]

 

Dec. 19   Soyuz • CSO 1

Launch time: 1637:14 GMT (11:37:14 a.m. EST)
Launch site: ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana

An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS20, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry into polar orbit the first Composante Spatiale Optique military reconnaissance satellite for CNES and DGA, the French defense procurement agency. The CSO 1 satellite is the first of three new-generation high-resolution optical imaging satellites for the French military, replacing the Helios 2 spy satellite series. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Scrubbed on Dec. 18 by unfavorable high-altitude winds. [Dec. 18]

 

Dec. 19/20   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: 0144 GMT on 20th (8:44 p.m. EST; 5:44 p.m. PST on 19th)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. Scrubbed on Dec. 18 by high ground winds. [Dec. 18]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

Note: I have not seen SpaceX or DOD issue any info for a GPS launch tomorrow...but some appear to be assuming this....don't be disappointed if not tomorrow.

 

 

 

For the ISS...

Quote

Wednesday, Dec. 19, 4:45 p.m.: Expedition 57 crew farewell at International Space Station and Soyuz spacecraft hatch closure. Hatch closure is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. EST.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 19, 7:45 p.m.: Undocking of the Soyuz spacecraft with the International Space Station Expedition 57 crew. Undocking is scheduled at 8:42 p.m. EST.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 19, 10:45 p.m.: Coverage of Soyuz deorbit burn and landing with the Expedition 57 crew. Deorbit burn scheduled at 11:09 p.m. EST with landing scheduled at 12:03 a.m. EST, Dec. 20.

watch at the link...NASA youtube channel...

https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive 

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DocM    16,895

 

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Draggendrop    5,748

Busy New years...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then for the launch schedule...

 

Quote

NET Jan. 6   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: Approx. 2150 GMT (4:50 p.m. EST; 1:50 p.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. Scrubbed on Dec. 18 by high ground winds. Scrubbed Dec. 19 after the detection of elevated hydrogen in one of the rocket’s engine compartments. Delayed from Dec. 30. [Dec. 28]

 

Jan. 7   Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 66-75

Launch time: 1553 GMT (10:53 a.m. EST; 7:53 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from October, November and Dec. 30. [Dec. 7]

subject to last minute changes...

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

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Draggendrop    5,748

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jim K    15,726

...and China has just landed Chang'e-4 on the far side of the moon.

 

 

Very cool.  

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Jim K    15,726
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Iran satellite in US row fails to reach orbit

 

Iran launched a satellite criticised by the United States as a breach of a UN resolution on Tuesday but it failed to reach orbit, the telecommunications minister said.

 

Iran's arch foe Israel swiftly condemned the launch, which it charged was cover for the testing of the first stage of an intercontinental ballistic missile.

 

"The Payam satellite was successfully launched this morning with the Safir satellite carrier," Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi told state television.

"But the satellite unfortunately failed to be placed in orbit in the final stage."

 

//snip

 

Phys.org

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DocM    16,895

https://spacenews.com/house-spending-bill-fires-warning-shot-at-jwst/

 

Quote

House spending bill fires warning shot at JWST

 

WASHINGTON — A new appropriations bill the House plans to vote on next week would provide $21.5 billion for NASA in 2019 but warns that any further problems with the James Webb Space Telescope could lead to its cancellation.
>
That bill includes the full $304.6 million requested for JWST in 2019, but the report accompanying the bill offered harsh language, and a warning, regarding the space telescope given the cost overruns and schedule delays announced last year.

"There is profound disappointment with both NASA and its contractors regarding mismanagement, complete lack of careful oversight, and overall poor basic workmanship on JWST," the report states. "NASA and its commercial partners seem to believe that congressional funding for this project and other development efforts is an entitlement, unaffected by failures to stay on schedule or within budget."
>

 

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Unobscured Vision    2,691

Not one bit surprised. We've been talking about this for years.

 

They've spent so much money on it that it's (at this point) like SLS/Orion -- too much money and time invested to cancel without suing the Contractor(s) responsible for the fiasco(s). Milking "Bessie" is gonna bite them in their collective butts, I promise you.

 

Problem with doing that is these Contractors have the best Legal Teams that money can buy ... it'd drag on for years.

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Jim K    15,726

Hayabusa just "touched" down on the Ryugu asteroid....for about a second before returning to a safe distance.  It also fired a projectile at the asteroid to produce fragments which will be brought back to earth in 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

201902212202.thumb.jpg.65c11c59e95dd84dfafd6e15ccfd2820.jpg

 

Can't wait to see the actual touchdown image...

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Beittil    584

Awesome how Tory is casually tweeting around moments before launch 😛

 

 

 

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Jim K    15,726

...and delayed (not so much a shock).  It still has to "complete a final set of extremely difficult environmental tests" ... so who knows.  Hopefully we are *finally* in the home stretch of this telescope getting blasted into space.

Quote

NASA Announces New James Webb Space Telescope Target Launch Date

 

NASA now is targeting Oct. 31, 2021, for the launch of the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope from French Guiana, due to impacts from the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, as well as technical challenges.

 

This decision is based on a recently completed schedule risk assessment of the remaining integration and test activities prior to launch. Previously, Webb was targeted to launch in March 2021.

 

“The perseverance and innovation of the entire Webb Telescope team has enabled us to work through challenging situations we could not have foreseen on our path to launch this unprecedented mission,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Webb is the world’s most complex space observatory, and our top science priority, and we’ve worked hard to keep progress moving during the pandemic. The team continues to be focused on reaching milestones and arriving at the technical solutions that will see us through to this new launch date next year.”

 

Testing of the observatory continues to go well at Northrop Grumman, the mission’s main industry partner, in Redondo Beach, California, despite the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic. Prior to the pandemic’s associated delays, the team made significant progress in achieving important milestones to prepare for launch in 2021.

 

As schedule margins grew tighter last fall, the agency planned to assess the progress of the project in April. This assessment was postponed due to the pandemic and was completed this week. The factors contributing to the decision to move the launch date include the impacts of augmented safety precautions, reduced on-site personnel, disruption to shift work, and other technical challenges. Webb will use existing program funding to stay within its $8.8 billion development cost cap.

 

“Based on current projections, the program expects to complete the remaining work within the new schedule without requiring additional funds,” said Gregory Robinson, NASA Webb program director at the agency’s headquarters. “Although efficiency has been affected and there are challenges ahead, we have retired significant risk through the achievements and good schedule performance over the past year. After resuming full operations to prepare for upcoming final observatory system-level environmental testing this summer, major progress continues towards preparing this highly complex observatory for launch.”

 

The project team will continue to complete a final set of extremely difficult environmental tests of the full observatory before it will be shipped to the launch site in Kourou, French Guiana, situated on the northeastern coast of South America.

 

This week, the project successfully completed electrical testing of the observatory. The test highlighted a major milestone in preparation for the upcoming acoustics and vibration environmental tests of the full observatory that are scheduled to start in August. In addition to ongoing deployments, ground system testing of the fully integrated observatory has followed immediately afterwards. Ensuring that every element of Webb functions properly before it gets to space is critical to its success.

 

The design of a very large space telescope and highly sophisticated instruments was required to enable Webb to answer fundamental questions about our cosmic origins outlined in the National Academy of Sciences 2000 Decadal Survey.

 

“Webb is designed to build upon the incredible legacies of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, by observing the infrared universe and exploring every phase of cosmic history,” said Eric Smith, NASA Webb’s program scientist at the agency’s headquarters. “The observatory will detect light from the first generation of galaxies that formed in the early universe after the big bang and study the atmospheres of nearby exoplanets for possible signs of habitability.”

 

//snip

 

NASA

 

 

 

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DocM    16,895

I'll believe it when it goes vertical 🤪

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