Grid Autosport for Linux (Steam)


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simplezz
9 hours ago, darth_vader said:

Yes, I am counting FPS, why whould I pay a fortune for a GFX to criple it with linux? I do like linux as a desktop os, but the fact remains that at this time, it is a no go for someone who wants the best from his PC in terms of gaming performance!!

You don't have to pay a fortune for a GFX these days to get decent performance. If you take a look at the part in your video when it changes the settings to 1080p with minimal graphics, the fps is almost the same. The difference is easily explained by the fact that the game was written against Windows then ported to Linux. I highly doubt they spent the same amount of time optimising the performance on opengl. And when you look at the framerates, it's understandable. They're absolutely fine on average, never dropping below 40fps on the highest settings.

 

Graphical performance will also improve as GPU companies like Nvidia and ATI further enhance their GNU/Linux drivers to support SteamOS,  the new disruptor in the console market.

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Ulyses
On 1/10/2016 at 9:28 PM, HawkMan said:

Firstly I don't hate, I don't care if games come out on linux or not. I don't see that it has an economic benefit for the vast majority of developers and the returns will be smaller than the investment.

 

You don't care? How come you're so well informed then?

 

 

Quote

 

However that bolded part if pure fantasy, and either you're living very sheltered and are only looking at steam with the "available on linux" filter on, or your purposely lying for some reason. because only a small fraction of new steam titles are coming on linux. Especially when you, as you did, qualify it with AAA titles. 

 

So, he's either clueless, disconnected fool or straight up devious, is what you're saying? Hmm, no hate then...

 

 

Quote

 

Tomb Raider? RB6 Siege? The Division? Just Cause 3? Fallout 4?  XCom2?

 

Just a handful of new and upcoming games on steam. all pretty major AAA titles that have/are or will be selling big. and...

 

finding games you can play on steam for linux is great for you, but trying to pretend it's something it isn't to sell it and steamOS/Steam machines to others is doing them a great disservice and is quite disloyal. 

 

Yeah, sure, let's compare the open source effort to the money MS throws at it, and let's forget these AAA games will not play well but on high end Windows machines, which somewhat shrinks down the Windows public by a large chunk. Mentioning that would be a great disservice and quite disloyal, would it?

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PGHammer
On 1/11/2016 at 0:01 PM, adrynalyne said:

 

Developer laziness is, in fact, the biggest issue WITH gaming on Linux - and that is coming from the Linux user community itself; not only Phoronix, but pre-Phoronix (on Slashdot).  Why do game developers in particular concentrate on Win32 to such a degree, even today (despite Win64 being more prevalent by a wide margin, just among the hardware base)?  Notice that I'm not talking about Linux game development at all; in fact, Steam saw their first non-beta x64-only game this year (ANNO 2205).  The drag is, in fact, worse on Linux than it is in terms of Win64 game development - and I'm talking about Linux x64 *application* development.  It certainly isn't lack of IDEs (unless you are referring to IDE quality - most Linux distributions DO include development tools, if not full-fledged IDEs); however, how many favorably compare to Visual Studio Code, let alone Visual Studio 2013 OR 2015 Community?  That may, in point of fact, be the biggest obstacle that Linux-based developers of any sort have to overcome - before merely VS Code, the bar was high between "Learning" versions of Visual Studio and Linux IDEs with even crippled VS winning in a near-walkover - now there is VS Code and Visual Studio Community - neither of which cost a thing - raising the quality bar even further. Development on Linux vs. development on ANY version of Windows has become more in favor of Windows than ever - even for garage/free software.  In fact, what exactly ARE indie game developers using in terms of development tools?  How many are using Linux-based development tools for any of it?

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Noir Angel
8 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

Developer laziness is, in fact, the biggest issue WITH gaming on Linux - and that is coming from the Linux user community itself; not only Phoronix, but pre-Phoronix (on Slashdot).  Why do game developers in particular concentrate on Win32 to such a degree, even today (despite Win64 being more prevalent by a wide margin, just among the hardware base)?  Notice that I'm not talking about Linux game development at all; in fact, Steam saw their first non-beta x64-only game this year (ANNO 2205).  The drag is, in fact, worse on Linux than it is in terms of Win64 game development - and I'm talking about Linux x64 *application* development.  It certainly isn't lack of IDEs (unless you are referring to IDE quality - most Linux distributions DO include development tools, if not full-fledged IDEs); however, how many favorably compare to Visual Studio Code, let alone Visual Studio 2013 OR 2015 Community?  That may, in point of fact, be the biggest obstacle that Linux-based developers of any sort have to overcome - before merely VS Code, the bar was high between "Learning" versions of Visual Studio and Linux IDEs with even crippled VS winning in a near-walkover - now there is VS Code and Visual Studio Community - neither of which cost a thing - raising the quality bar even further. Development on Linux vs. development on ANY version of Windows has become more in favor of Windows than ever - even for garage/free software.  In fact, what exactly ARE indie game developers using in terms of development tools?  How many are using Linux-based development tools for any of it?

I'm pretty sure Wolfenstein: The New Order released in may 2014 was x64 only.

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Unobscured Vision
2 hours ago, PGHammer said:

Developer laziness is, in fact, the biggest issue WITH gaming on Linux - and that is coming from the Linux user community itself; not only Phoronix, but pre-Phoronix (on Slashdot).  Why do game developers in particular concentrate on Win32 to such a degree, even today (despite Win64 being more prevalent by a wide margin, just among the hardware base)?  Notice that I'm not talking about Linux game development at all; in fact, Steam saw their first non-beta x64-only game this year (ANNO 2205).  The drag is, in fact, worse on Linux than it is in terms of Win64 game development - and I'm talking about Linux x64 *application* development.  It certainly isn't lack of IDEs (unless you are referring to IDE quality - most Linux distributions DO include development tools, if not full-fledged IDEs); however, how many favorably compare to Visual Studio Code, let alone Visual Studio 2013 OR 2015 Community?  That may, in point of fact, be the biggest obstacle that Linux-based developers of any sort have to overcome - before merely VS Code, the bar was high between "Learning" versions of Visual Studio and Linux IDEs with even crippled VS winning in a near-walkover - now there is VS Code and Visual Studio Community - neither of which cost a thing - raising the quality bar even further. Development on Linux vs. development on ANY version of Windows has become more in favor of Windows than ever - even for garage/free software.  In fact, what exactly ARE indie game developers using in terms of development tools?  How many are using Linux-based development tools for any of it?

Here's the scary part -- I agree with you. 

 

Between Visual Studio Community, Unreal Editor and Blender, that's pretty much everything an Indie Dev needs to create a game. And guess what? They can compile that game for 'Nix using Windows. And all of those tools are free. Unreal Editor has free packs, even -- and they're worth the download. I know, because I've been working on a game on and off for the past year using UE4Editor and Blender, and then VSC came out and I added that to the toolset.

 

All you need at that point is a copy of FLStudio or Reaper ($199 on up) to do the audio work ... and yes, I know, there are FOSS DAW's out there. I've been using FLStudio and Reaper for so long I can't be bothered to learn anything else.

 

My point is that if you're doing dev work, Windows is still the superior platform for ease-of-use and has more tools available. If 'Nix wants to be the go-to dev platform, things need to improve by orders of magnitude.

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