please convince me to stay on windows phone


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DConnell

 I love Windows Phone/Windows Mobile, but that's not relevant to your needs. Ultimately you need to use what gets the job done for you. Not what is popular, what others recommend or what your favorite company puts out.

 

For me that's Windows. I don't like Apple, and the Android devices I've used were less than exceptional. Meanwhile I've had nothing but rock solid experiences with Windows Phone 7, 8 and 8.1. They've had the apps I personally need, great battery life, great performance and stability. WM10 is a little less great at the moment, but it's getting there. But it's no worse than the Android phone and tablets I had, so I can live with it, and worst case at the moment is I roll the 1520 back to 8.1.

 

But that's my experience. Ultimately you need to decide what matters most - app selection, stability, battery life, etc. and see what phone and OS matches your needs.

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Nick Sheldon

I have been with Windows phone for eight years and have been a staunch supporter. From the Lumia 800 > 820 > 920 > 930.

I aren't that bothered about the app-gap. The big selling points for me were the camera and the HERE maps. Well... Microsoft have ######ed both of them over when they bought Nokia. Camera has gone total ###### after 930 and the HERE maps will stop after June..

Now, there is no reason to buy a Windows Phone..

Cheers Microsoft, you have well and truly ###### me off.

I'm gradually moving away. Bought a PS4, next phone I don't know what it will be, but it won't be windows. Sticking with Win8.1 on my laptops and Win7 on my desktop.

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game_over
On 20 January 2016 at 1:03 PM, subcld said:

if you are going to feel bad for switching to android here is another New Microsoft app for Android yeah for android NOT windows phone this company does not care about its own OS

 

 

 

This would basically tell me everything I need to know.


I wouldn't be willing to support something it's own company is barely doing.

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Nick Sheldon
On 10/04/2016 at 10:26 PM, Nick Sheldon said:

I have been with Windows phone for eight years and have been a staunch supporter. From the Lumia 800 > 820 > 920 > 930.

I aren't that bothered about the app-gap. The big selling points for me were the camera and the HERE maps. Well... Microsoft have ######ed both of them over when they bought Nokia. Camera has gone total ###### after 930 and the HERE maps will stop after June..

Now, there is no reason to buy a Windows Phone..

Cheers Microsoft, you have well and truly ###### me off.

I'm gradually moving away. Bought a PS4, next phone I don't know what it will be, but it won't be windows. Sticking with Win8.1 on my laptops and Win7 on my desktop.

Right... I have come on here to put things straight.

 

For the last two weeks I have been checking out various phone reviews etc and I have finally bit the bullet and bought a new one.

 

You might be surprised after the rant above but I went for the Microsoft Lumia 950.

Why?

Biggest selling point for me is the camera. Now I don't know who has spread the fud about the camera being rubbish on the new lumia, but whoever it is is totally and utterly wrong. The phtographs / videos capable with this hardware is astonishing. Microsoft have done a briliant job with the pureview.

Windows 10 has matured very well on the mobile. It's 100x different than the experience I was getting on an old 920 (I know this phone isn't supported now). The apps I use are working fine except for the facebook app which in all honesty is complete pants. It's very slow. But they are actively working on this and I use touch.facebook.com more anyway.

 

Reason for not going Android

Way too intrusive with all the google apps installing themselves all the time. The OS always slows down after a bit, and I just don't trust google. The Nexus 7 tablet I have at home is next to useless after the updates. I understand buying a flagship android phone is the way to go, but they are lacking in the camera department when up against the 950.

 

Reason for not going Apple..

 

It's apple

 

So, I hope I have put things right and there is a better balanced view now that I am actually using the phone.

 

Cheers

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Xahid

Ditch the Windows Phone for good & Enjoy the freedom of Android.

 

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Jack W
24 minutes ago, Nick Sheldon said:

Right... I have come on here to put things straight.

 

For the last two weeks I have been checking out various phone reviews etc and I have finally bit the bullet and bought a new one.

 

You might be surprised after the rant above but I went for the Microsoft Lumia 950.

Why?

Biggest selling point for me is the camera. Now I don't know who has spread the fud about the camera being rubbish on the new lumia, but whoever it is is totally and utterly wrong. The phtographs / videos capable with this hardware is astonishing. Microsoft have done a briliant job with the pureview.

Windows 10 has matured very well on the mobile. It's 100x different than the experience I was getting on an old 920 (I know this phone isn't supported now). The apps I use are working fine except for the facebook app which in all honesty is complete pants. It's very slow. But they are actively working on this and I use touch.facebook.com more anyway.

 

Reason for not going Android

Way too intrusive with all the google apps installing themselves all the time. The OS always slows down after a bit, and I just don't trust google. The Nexus 7 tablet I have at home is next to useless after the updates. I understand buying a flagship android phone is the way to go, but they are lacking in the camera department when up against the 950.

 

Reason for not going Apple..

 

It's apple

 

So, I hope I have put things right and there is a better balanced view now that I am actually using the phone.

 

Cheers

100% agree about the camera. I've got the 950XL and the camera is amazing - best quality photos I've ever taken, and everyone says so.

3 minutes ago, Xahid said:

Ditch the Windows Phone for good & Enjoy the freedom of Android.

 

The freedom of Android where you're unlikely to ever get an upgrade? :p

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what
25 minutes ago, Nick Sheldon said:

Reason for not going Apple..

 

It's apple

 

So, I hope I have put things right and there is a better balanced view now 

 

...

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  • 4 weeks later...
ACTIONpack

I have own Windows Phone since 2011. I do like the platform design over Android and iOS. The problem with Windows 10 Mobile is the app gap. It may not be important if you are on Windows but when you switch to Android or iOS its very to be able to download a parking app or a flight company app and use it.

 

I own 2 Lumia 950 (one broken) and I can tell you that the OS locks up all the time. I'm an insider which you have to if you want a feature OS.

 

Got to remember Microsoft is only keeping the Windows 10 Mobile because its part of Windows platform and its a way to test user experience when having a platform. You will need to understand its no longer an OS that will be supported by 3rd parties that long. Microsoft is trying to find the next new thing. They lost the Mobile OS space.

 

Reason I'm still using it because I like the user experience over android and iOS but I will have to jump ship in time which I will be sad but will need to be done. I don't see Microsoft releasing new hardware until late 2017.

 

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