(Rumor) - 3D TV going the way of the Dodo Bird.


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Raa
2 minutes ago, TAZMINATOR said:

No. I caught your original post before you edited.

 

I edited mine because auto-correct...   I changed from resurrection to resurrect.   Stupid auto-correct system.

Yeah I can see where you quoted me, but that's not what I originally posted (or at least intended to post), hence my ????

 

Anyway, no need to derail the thread now. :)

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PGHammer
On 2/19/2016 at 10:20 AM, jjkusaf said:

yep, curved TVs should be the next thing to die.

 

I'm also waiting for a straight up OLED TV to eventually replace my Pioneer Elite plasma.  I just want equal to ... or better than ... display quality that this 7 year old plasma gives me without all the gimmicks.  

Curved HDTVs have their place - so does 4K; Samsung, for example, makes both curved and flat versions of their UHD and SUHD (4K) Smart TVs in every series; only the 6250 curved 4K model went away (currently closing out at Walmart.com and local Wal-Marts).  I'm looking at the flat (UN40KU6300) because it will replace another flat TV - one of the candidates for replacing is on a wall, and will use the same mount.

The sick-making part is that 4K (especially flat) is not merely the same price as non-4K, it can be, in fact, cheaper than non-4K was within the last five years - the Sony BX450 (one of the candidates for replacement) is two years old; yet the Samsung is cheaper now than the Sony was then.  (The SmartHub is, in fact, icing; the 4K support/HDR support/upscaling engine are the selling points.)

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Yogurth
21 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

Curved HDTVs have their place - so does 4K; Samsung, for example, makes both curved and flat versions of their UHD and SUHD (4K) Smart TVs in every series; only the 6250 curved 4K model went away (currently closing out at Walmart.com and local Wal-Marts).  I'm looking at the flat (UN40KU6300) because it will replace another flat TV - one of the candidates for replacing is on a wall, and will use the same mount.

The sick-making part is that 4K (especially flat) is not merely the same price as non-4K, it can be, in fact, cheaper than non-4K was within the last five years - the Sony BX450 (one of the candidates for replacement) is two years old; yet the Samsung is cheaper now than the Sony was then.  (The SmartHub is, in fact, icing; the 4K support/HDR support/upscaling engine are the selling points.)

IMHO curved TV's make sense if You are watching TV alone and centered. For every other situation "Straight" screens will do better.

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PGHammer
5 hours ago, Yogurth said:

IMHO curved TV's make sense if You are watching TV alone and centered. For every other situation "Straight" screens will do better.

Agreed - that mirrors my own thinking. (It is also why I'm NOT looking at curved for my bedroom; curved TVs require different sorts of mounts than their flat relations.  Flat TVs (as long as they are not too large for the wall) can use standard VESA mounts; therefore, you need not replace the mount when you upgrade the TV - and especially NOT a TV the same size as the one being replaced/passed down.

 

Also, given that I have a tablet, notebooks, and a desktop PC that I can stream content to, a "smart" TV is in no way a "gotta have" feature in an upgrade.  I won't say no if the price makes sense otherwise; however, that in and of itself is NOT a decision-driver (nor would I think it would be for most folks).

 

Lastly, there has also been a change in what is behind the "smart" functionality - Sony, for instance, now uses Android in more of their own "smart" HDTVs (in fact, all except the cheapest such TVs), and the gap between those without Android TV (Sony's branding for the feature) and those that do is less than $100 in the 40" and 43" classes - and that is SRP vs. SRP.

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