Falcon 9: Eutelsat & ABS dual-manifested commsats (mission thread)


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Unobscured Vision

Yeah, that "Super Hover + Correction" looked quite interesting, but it ran out of LOX and slammed the deck. It was an "almost there" scenario. A "reverse treachery" condition to the ULA near-mishap. :laugh: Not enough LOX ... 

 

We can see the Falcon-9 trying to compensate ... quite remarkable, really. It's a 12-story building trying to balance itself, and did. Just ran outta what it needed to finish the landing. 3 more seconds worth of LOX would have done it.

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Draggendrop

This was an incredible profile, everything, minus the lox shortage, was intentional and executed...don't know what to call this approach, but it was not a hover slam, more like a "slew entry to hover and then to fluffy ASDS leaf blower dusting drop", how about "slewy hover fluffy " (real scientific terminology employed here!). The deceleration happened much higher and the entry appeared to contain more horizontal vector, like a residual  after lifting body entry.

 

Gutsy experimentation and well worth it, this needs to be done. This stage did this after lifting those 2 monster sat's with a small fuel  reserve.

 

I have a feeling, we haven't seen the last of this for awhile...landings are going to be even more exciting.

 

// that would make this a "reverse treachery with slewy hover fluffy".

 

:D

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Draggendrop

This one is not as nice as Doc's stabilized video, but still very impressive...particularly the length of time in controlled hover.

 

I am so stunned by this landing , I must have played these video's a few dozen times now...

 

 

 

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

Yeah, it's almost like they're trying to be nicer to the ASDS's surface now. Those hard landings must be taking a toll. Totally understandable, they need to preserve it. Expensive to repair it everytime they get back into port, and it's more time that they have to potentially wait when it could be out catching S1's.

 

Ooooh. They're gonna have a "stacker boat". Catch an S1, hoist it onto the stacker boat, wait for the next one to land ... :D All they'd need are two ASDS's and a third on-station to catch FH's Core further downrange.

 

That's SpaceX thinking. Instead of a crapload of 'em (big investment), they only have to have a few of 'em, then build a few "stacker boats" to carry the S1's that come in.

 

So, using that logic, all they'd need are 9 ASDS's, 9 Stacker Boats (3 out at any time, then 3 to go out as "Relief", the other 3 are hauling FH Cores), and the usual Bobsey Twins and Escorts for Recovery. :yes: Company isn't spending a pallet of money, and they get jobs done. :D 

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DocM

I'm almost wondering if they're trying to get the minimum thrust below the current 40% so it can hover. The upper stage M1DVac can do 38.5%, but it really needs to be 35% to hover, 30% for a hover with margin.

Edited by DocM
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Unobscured Vision

Ooooh, performance range upgrades. Now we're talkin'. Always testing new things. Even when it looks like they aren't, they are. 

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DocM

Yeah. A major league moving target, they are. Hard on those competitors who aren't so agile.

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Unobscured Vision

Oh yeah. Too busy figuring out which form to fill out and which focus group handles which torque wrench to use for each bolt. Oh, and said torque wrench and bolt each costs $599.95, billed to the taxpayers. And by the time all of that is decided and the disbursements are filled out in triplicate, they send the forms up to middle management for review. And middle management doesn't meet again until .... 

 

Next Quarter.

 

And since a Delta Heavy launched recently, Bruno's on vacay somewhere in the Virgin Islands or something.

 

Meanwhile, SpaceX has already landed Falcon-9's and is prepping Falcon Heavy, LC-39A, and Dragon-2. Oh, and getting simulations-n-stuff finished up for the big conference in September for BFR/BFS's reveal. :yes: 

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Draggendrop

Approximate ETA for Elsbeth III is 0200UTC(Sunday)/2200EDT(Saturday)

 

Go twins arrived.

0DMLs4p.jpg

image link

 

E3 and ASDS position

 

:)

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Draggendrop

bits and bytes....

 

rMGqvqF.png

Jetty park cam

image link

 

Image album "entering port"

Image link

 

deck image...

image link

 

ASDS docked and crane ops have begun.

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Unobscured Vision

Bleowch. Wonder how bad the deck damage is.

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Jim K

Ouch...poor Falcon9 Stage 1.  May you RIP knowing your sacrifice was not in vain.  "Of course I still love you" ... still loves you even though you blew up on her. 

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Unobscured Vision

Well then. :( So far Elon's estimate holds water. We're at the 70~80% recovery margin.

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DocM

For now. F9/M1D get another thrust upgrade later this year.

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  • 6 months later...
Draggendrop

Eutelsat America’s all-electric satellite enters service after seven-month journey 

 

rsz_creation__enquetedecom-879x485.jpg

Eutelsat graphic showing the orbit raising procedure for the all-electric Eutelsat 115 West B. Photo: Eutelsat/EnQuetedeCom 

 

Quote

WASHINGTON — The second of two all-electric satellites fleet operator Eutelsat gained through its acquisition of Satmex began service Jan. 16 after finishing a seven-month journey to its orbital location, Eutelsat announced.

Eutelsat 117 West B launched last June on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with ABS-2A, a similar all-electric satellite Boeing built for Bermuda-based ABS. Both satellites formed the second set in a four-satellite order paired with Falcon 9 dual launches. ABS and Satmex, now Eutelsat Americas, praised the deal as producing substantial cost savings, while accepting the tradeoff that it would take months instead of days for their spacecraft to reach their final orbits.

Despite the hype that surrounded ABS and Satmex’s 2012 group purchase of four all-electric Boeing 702SP satellites, Boeing has yet to close a similar deal.

Satellites using all-electric propulsion can weigh as little has half those equipped with chemical propulsion. Operators can use this mass savings to pack bigger payloads onto a spacecraft platform or, as was the case of Eutelsat and ABS, make due with smaller satellites and save on launch costs.

 

more at the link...

http://spacenews.com/eutelsat-americas-all-electric-satellite-enters-service-after-seven-month-journey/

 

:)

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