British voters evenly split ahead of EU referendum - YouGov poll


 Share

Recommended Posts

Quote

 

British voters evenly split ahead of EU referendum - YouGov poll

 

?m=02&d=20160525&t=2&i=1138583762&w=644&

 

Britons are evenly split on whether the country should remain or leave the European Union, a YouGov poll showed on Wednesday, as the In campaign struggles with poor voter support for its leader Prime Minister David Cameron.

 

A YouGov poll for the Times newspaper put support for the Remain campaign at 41 percent, down 3 percentage points since last week, with support for Leave up 1 point on 41 percent.

 

Four percent of respondents said they would not vote while 13 percent still did not know which way they would go with less than a month until polling day.

 

The polls, which are being closely watched by financial markets for their ability to move the value of sterling, have been close in the run-up to the referendum, but the Remain camp had appeared to take a lead in the last 10 days.

 

An ICM poll released on Tuesday, however, showed the rival sides tied, and YouGov on Wednesday said the referendum was damaging trust in Cameron, after he warned about the risks to Britain's economy and security if it votes to leave.

 

Asked who they trusted over Europe and the referendum, just 18 percent said they trusted Cameron, down 2 percent since YouGov asked the same question in early March.

 

The person most trusted was Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London who is leading the campaign to take Britain out of the 28-member bloc, who was trusted by 31 percent of respondents.

 

Britons will vote on June 23 in a historic referendum on whether to stay in the group the country joined in 1973. YouGov said its poll took place on May 23-24 but did not give any further details.

 

Source

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard most people saying they would like to remain in. Whilst they do have reasons if they were to vote out, the reasons to stay in are higher at this point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally I believe we should stay in the EU

But I've seen how much 'food product' we import, I won't go into details as I'm not a tin foil hat kinda guy

 

(also, that's not the only reason)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, The Evil Overlord said:

Personally I believe we should stay in the EU

But I've seen how much 'food product' we import, I won't go into details as I'm not a tin foil hat kinda guy

 

(also, that's not the only reason)

*passes tin foil hat*

 

You were saying? :rofl:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

Personally I believe we should stay in the EU

But I've seen how much 'food product' we import, I won't go into details as I'm not a tin foil hat kinda guy

 

(also, that's not the only reason)

You guys would be giving up your pound which is stronger than the Euro and giving up sovereignty as the UK nation. But, as an American.. I'll just sit back and let the chips fall as they lie. I just hope the brits don't live to regret their choice to stay in. I see Greece, and soon Spain and Portugal next.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, chrisj1968 said:

You guys would be giving up your pound which is stronger than the Euro and giving up sovereignty as the UK nation. But, as an American.. I'll just sit back and let the chips fall as they lie. I just hope the brits don't live to regret their choice to stay in. I see Greece, and soon Spain and Portugal next.

Pound is here to stay. If I remember correctly, it was part of the renegotiations that took place, where all EU members agreed to it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Jack W said:

*passes tin foil hat*

 

You were saying? :rofl:

lol

Wincanton, Grocontinental, MRCT, GIST, Tesco, 2 Sisters Food Group, All have food storage and processing depots dotted all over the country, with trucks arriving daily from the EU with bought in food for processing, I've worked as a shunter and as a driver in my career and something tells me the that there will be more red tape and taxes on those items once we're not covered by the 'shared blanket' of the EU

And that's just one aspect

 

edit

 

one aspect I felt I had sufficient knowledge to talk about

there could be dozens, or even hundreds of other aspects I'm not aware about

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Jack W said:

Pound is here to stay. If I remember correctly, it was part of the renegotiations that took place, where all EU members agreed to it.

well then, that's good news. the issue I have is a bunch of bureaucrats in Belgium trying to say what will/will not happen with the UK. I happen to like Nigel Farrage while  I know many don't. But what I like about him is, he isn't afraid to tell it like it is. He has oft times complained at how the EU has ruined the European continent. but this is strictly a personal opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

well then, that's good news. the issue I have is a bunch of bureaucrats in Belgium trying to say what will/will not happen with the UK. I happen to like Nigel Farrage while  I know many don't. But what I like about him is, he isn't afraid to tell it like it is. He has oft times complained at how the EU has ruined the European continent. but this is strictly a personal opinion.

Nigel is someone who should never be given power. Someone being able to tell it how it is, is cool and all that, but also a recipe for disaster, and volatile.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Jack W said:

Nigel is someone who should never be given power. Someone being able to tell it how it is, is cool and all that, but also a recipe for disaster, and volatile.

I heard someone tried to off him on the freeway in some country, I forget where. but he was able to get out of his car. they had loosened the tires on his car. so yeah speaking your mind does have its drawbacks. ;) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, The Evil Overlord said:

My sympathies

well he did jump on the stupidity of the EU president. He stated that he is an unelected official who, along with the rest of the EU plays mafia tactics by siphoning a countries wealth out, as in the case of Greece. the EU by way of Germany wanted Greece or the EU to steal peoples money out of their bank accounts to offset the debt. that is unacceptable. I wouldn't want your money to be stolen like that through austerity measures. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

well he did jump on the stupidity of the EU president. He stated that he is an unelected official who, along with the rest of the EU plays mafia tactics by siphoning a countries wealth out, as in the case of Greece. the EU by way of Germany wanted Greece or the EU to steal peoples money out of their bank accounts to offset the debt. that is unacceptable. I wouldn't want your money to be stolen like that through austerity measures. 

All I'll say is this: take whatever rubble Farage spits out with a fine, fine grain of salt. The salt intake is probably better for your health than Farage anyways.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

well he did jump on the stupidity of the EU president. He stated that he is an unelected official who, along with the rest of the EU plays mafia tactics by siphoning a countries wealth out, as in the case of Greece. the EU by way of Germany wanted Greece or the EU to steal peoples money out of their bank accounts to offset the debt. that is unacceptable. I wouldn't want your money to be stolen like that through austerity measures. 

I honestly believe the austerity will be more severe if we left, the lesser of the 2 evils would be to stay put, the Greece situation is stupidity, no argument from me there, but I'm not a megabank or some other global influence power, so at best I'll have uneducated guesses as to why that happened, so I won't bother.

I've seen some of Angela Merkel's 'proposals' on tv and although I'm not 100 convinced, I was less convinced by the opposition

but that's just me

 

(unless you were talking about Joachim Gauck, in which case I'm not up to speed <know zilch> about his policies)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd take Farrage over Cameron anyday. From the article, seems like Cameron is liked even less. which parties do they purport to support?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

I'd take Farrage over Cameron anyday. From the article, seems like Cameron is liked even less. which parties do they purport to support?

 

 

Of course people will like Cameron less. It is the same with everyone who becomes prime minister. Why? Because they make changes, people hate change, so they cry. But the fact is - those same people liked him enough to vote him in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

I'd take Farrage over Cameron anyday. From the article, seems like Cameron is liked even less. which parties do they purport to support?

 

 

again, my sympathies

I don't like Cameron much but I happened to agree with him, Farrage, like Nick Griffin, have one agenda.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, The Evil Overlord said:

I honestly believe the austerity will be more severe if we left, the lesser of the 2 evils would be to stay put, the Greece situation is stupidity, no argument from me there, but I'm not a megabank or some other global influence power, so at best I'll have uneducated guesses as to why that happened, so I won't bother.

I've seen some of Angela Merkel's 'proposals' on tv and although I'm not 100 convinced, I was less convinced by the opposition

but that's just me

the big problem is Germany wields to much power. I remember Helmut Kohl was the one who paid for the setup of the European union. So Germany thinks it'll strong arm other nations into acquiescing to bring the UK to its knees over money. I recall the Rothschild family did just that to the UK by forcing a post war tax on the UK. If memory serves, he had news sent that the UK lost the battle of waterloo so the stocks dropped to pence on the pound, he bought most of the market. when the news came back the UK won the battle, he owned most of the stocks and walked away a VERY rich man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

well he did jump on the stupidity of the EU president. He stated that he is an unelected official who, along with the rest of the EU plays mafia tactics by siphoning a countries wealth out, as in the case of Greece. the EU by way of Germany wanted Greece or the EU to steal peoples money out of their bank accounts to offset the debt. that is unacceptable. I wouldn't want your money to be stolen like that through austerity measures. 

Not only that. Deutsche Bank managed to dump a lot of bad derivates onto the Greek economy. Greece as it once was doesn't exist anymore .. it is merely a vessel now. Everything that could be bought up has been by the big EU players. This wasn't the first country in the EU that went through this process.

 

24 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

lol

Wincanton, Grocontinental, MRCT, GIST, Tesco, 2 Sisters Food Group, All have food storage and processing depots dotted all over the country, with trucks arriving daily from the EU with bought in food for processing, I've worked as a shunter and as a driver in my career and something tells me the that there will be more red tape and taxes on those items once we're not covered by the 'shared blanket' of the EU

And that's just one aspect

 

edit

 

one aspect I felt I had sufficient knowledge to talk about

there could be dozens, or even hundreds of other aspects I'm not aware about

Wouldn't the internal agricultural economy rise if Britain was to leave the EU? As far as I understood the southern EU market prices are making it difficult for the local producers to compete. Maybe leaving could lead to a restructuring of this industry. It might benefit this sector as a whole. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Jack W said:

More sunshine? I think. I've noticed more sun than rain recently... could just be me.

Sun always rises in the EAST. Too BAD! :shiftyninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, FunkyMike said:

 

 

Wouldn't the internal agricultural economy rise if Britain was to leave the EU? As far as I understood the southern EU market prices are making it difficult for the local producers to compete. Maybe leaving could lead to a restructuring of this industry. It might benefit this sector as a whole. 

the Mediterranean nations benefit more since winters aren't as harsh as they are in the northern nations. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, FunkyMike said:

Wouldn't the internal agricultural economy rise if Britain was to leave the EU? As far as I understood the southern EU market prices are making it difficult for the local producers to compete. Maybe leaving could lead to a restructuring of this industry. It might benefit this sector as a whole. 

Rise, yes, but not in the numbers to sustain the population, probably not even enough to even register, we're talking about 1000's on tons of food product, daily, current reserves are ok, but even they'll run out, not to mention panic buying and other behaviour..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not voting. Simply I don't know enough to want to leave. What would happen to families who have setup a life and family in the UK? Those with mixed British\European children? No one has explained the consequences in those terms, but have only spoken about the economic issues.

 

On the same token, I do think we would be better off leaving in terms of red tape. We would be free to trade how we wish with who we wish without the barriers the EU put up. We could easily setup our own trade deals with other countries.

 

So, as I have too many unknowns on each side, it would be wrong for me to vote either way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Most devices, including iPhones, could soon be forced to use USB-C charging
      by Usama Jawad

      Image via Google The European Commission (EC) has put forward a new proposal according to which all hardware manufacturers will be forced to use USB-C as the charging port for most devices. The motivation behind the proposed standard is that it will aid in reducing e-waste since consumers will be able to utilize charging cables from their old devices instead of purchasing new ones. The EC has also suggested that manufacturers drop chargers from their packaging altogether, something that several OEMs are already doing.

      The proposal covers the use of USB-C charging in smartphones, tablets, cameras, headphones, portable speakers, and handheld consoles. Meanwhile, smartwatches, earbuds, and fitness trackers are exempt. EC executive vice-president Margarethe Vestager had the following to say about the proposal:

      In totality, the EC has stated that USB-C with a unified fast charging technology implementation should become the standard. While the charger should be unbundled by OEMs, they are required to be more transparent towards consumers in terms of informing them about charging performance and support for fast charging, so that users can judge if their existing chargers fulfill respective criteria.

      In terms of next steps, the legislation will need to go through a vote in the European Parliament today, and if successful, it will become law. Should that happen, hardware manufacturers will have up to two years to adopt USB-C as the standard. The legislation is most likely to affect Apple devices such as iPhones the most, as they still come with proprietary Lightning ports and cables. Should the proposal become law, Apple will be forced to substitute Lightning connectivity with USB-C ports across its device portfolio - where applicable - within the next two years.

    • By zikalify
      Three UK announces the re-introduction of roaming fees in the EU
      by Paul Hill



      Following the lead of EE and Vodafone, Three has announced that it’s going to be re-introducing roaming charges within the European Union. The charges will start on May 23, 2022, and will affect those who took out a contract or upgraded with Three from October 1, 2021.

      The new charge will see customers pay £2 per day while roaming inside the EU and £5 a day when roaming without. Pay as you go customers or customers that have taken out a contract before October 1, 2021, will be unaffected by these changes. There will also be no roaming fee to pay when you visit the Republic of Ireland.

      Explaining the decision to bring back roaming, Three said:

      Three said that by re-introducing roaming fees it’ll be able to continue offering ‘cost-effective deals’ to customers. It said that the new pricing is simple and affordable and by only charging roamers, its other customers will not have to absorb the costs.

    • By zikalify
      Ireland fines WhatsApp €225 million over violations of GDPR
      by Paul Hill



      Ireland’s Data Protection Commission (DPC) has announced that it’s fining WhatsApp €225 million due to violations of GDPR which came into force across the European Union several years ago. Today’s decision is the end of an investigation that began on December 10, 2018, and took several twists and turns in the period since.

      The investigation set out to seek whether WhatsApp had met its transparency obligations under GDPR which require it to supply requested information to both users and non-users of its service.

      Following a comprehensive investigation, the DPC provided its draft report to all Concerned Supervisory Authorities (CSAs) in December 2020 where objections were received from eight of the CSAs. The DPC and the CSAs were unable to come to a consensus on the issue which triggered a dispute resolution process on June 3, 2021.

      At the end of July, the European Data Protection Board told DPC to reassess and increase its proposed fine; the new fine WhatsApp will now face is €225 million. The DPC has also ordered WhatsApp to bring its data processing into compliance with GDPR rules.

      The latest fine from Europe should act as a reminder to companies that they must strictly adhere to GDPR rules when operating in EU countries. At the time of writing, Facebook’s stock price had fallen 0.77%.

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Google protests €500M fine imposed in France over row with news agencies
      by Usama Jawad



      Back in July, French regulatory authorities slapped Google with a €500 million ($592 million) fine for failing to reach an agreement with news publishers in the country. Essentially, the French Competition Authority had mandated that Google should hold talks with a publisher within three months after a request is made. These meetings were to be conducted in order to decide how much news outlets should be paid to have their content displayed on Google News. The hefty fine was imposed because many major news agencies claimed that the talks held by Google were not in good faith and that they were not fairly compensated.

      Previous court documents indicated that Google agreed to pay 121 news publishers a sum of €64 million ($76 million) over a period of three years to put an end to the case, but this offer was clearly not enough for French agencies.

      As reported by Reuters, Google France's head Sebastien Missoffe has protested the decision today, stating that:

      The appeal will be formally ruled on by the Paris' court of appeal, but according to the French Competition Authority, Google will have to pay the fine regardless.

      When it imposed the penalty on July 13, the French watchdog also stipulated that Google is required to present proposals about compensation plans for news agencies within the next two months, or face up to €900,000 ($1.07 million) per day once this deadline expires. It will be interesting to see how the tech giant proceeds given that the odds seem stacked against it.

    • By zikalify
      Vodafone re-introduces EU roaming charges because Brexit allows them to do it
      by Paul Hill



      In December last year, Vodafone, EE, O2, and Three all assured the public that they had no plans to bring back roaming charges when travelling around the European Union after they were scrapped several years ago. EE was the first to reveal it was going back on its word in June but now Vodafone has announced it’s doing the same.

      According to the firm, nothing is free and has to be paid for by someone. It also said that most of its customers do not travel and don't need free roaming so they shouldn’t have to subsidise this feature for those who do need it. Therefore, it will remove this feature from some of its plans and make those who need the feature pay more.

      While this is definitely bad news for people who travel to Europe often, the company does say that the changes will only affect new and upgrading customers. Additionally, the new terms will come in on August 11 but the actual roaming charges won’t need to be paid until January 6, 2022. For those who don’t want to pay for roaming, you will be able to acquire one of Vodafone’s Xtra plans which include roaming in 83 worldwide destinations. If you don’t need an entire plan, eight and 15-day passes can be purchased for just £1 a day.

      One exception to the changes will be the Republic of Ireland. Any roaming charges in the country will remain inclusive for all customers.

      One of the big complaints with roaming charges before, was that people were being lumped with massive bills that were too expensive. Going forward, Vodafone says there will be no unexpectedly high bills and that you’ll be able to set a spending limit on your data usage. While the firm claims that roaming fees will be transparent, we won’t really know if this is true until it’s implemented and people start being billed for roaming.