Trouble with Kali


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+xrobwx71

I installed Kali 2016.1 64bit in a dual boot scenario with Win 10 Pro 64bit. It was working great for a few hours as I booted into Kali, I surfed, I executed a few apps, checked out the calculator, etc etc. I chose restart went back to Win 10 and did not have internet, reset net adapter and internet works. Surfed a bit, decided to go back to Kali, booted to Kali fine surfed, etc... this happened about 6 times or so then I got this trying to boot into Kali: kali_issue.jpg

I can boot into WIn 10 just fine. I am new to Linux so...... Thanks!

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Unobscured Vision

Wow. Did you reboot a couple of times and the problem occur each time? If it did, then either GRUB is borked or the drive you installed to is failing.

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+xrobwx71
34 minutes ago, Unobscured Vision said:

Wow. Did you reboot a couple of times and the problem occur each time? If it did, then either GRUB is borked or the drive you installed to is failing.

thanks for the reply.

Yes, I did reboot a couple of times in order to go back and forth between Kali and Win 10. This looks to be do able from my internet research. And as I said, it did work the first few times. Why would GRUB be borked? I didn't do anything but surf and open a few programs in Kali. I didn't even open terminal yet at this point.Is Win 10 doing somthing to GRUB?  The drive is fine as far as I can tell as I am typing this on the Win Pro install from said drive. The drive is only about 5 months old. Yes, I know you can get a "new" bad drive but I've extensively tested this drive with use: Gaming, Gimp, etc for 6+months. 

I have been peeking around at linux for a few years and decided to give it a go. I messed with Ubuntu for a month or so  about 3 years ago. I'm thinking maybe I should just stick with Windows for now.

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Unobscured Vision

Shouldn't be possible for Windows to be doing anything like Hibernating the drive. Should also not be possible for Windows to do anything to GRUB either.

 

Was there any update activity inside Kali before you rebooted, or did you interrupt an in-progress update? That's the only thing aside from something more deliberate or a failure that I can think of that could do this. :( 

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+xrobwx71

Not that I could tell. There was no indication to anything happening. No dialogues ect.  I tried re-installing Kali and GRUB  to the partition and it did the same thing.  By the way, this partition I created on the C:\ drive in which the Windows 10 Pro resides, using gparted. I booted Kali from a USB and installed from there to this partition. It all worked very well through five or 6 reboots (switching between Windows 10 and Kali). 

 

update:

I have since deleted the partition I created and rebuilt the Windows MBR and will start over. I'm going to go over the steps and make sure I didn't miss anything. I  have a great desire to learn Linux at least as well as I know Windows. I have a live version of Kali on USB with persistence and I think I'll stick with that until I learn more.

 

I do sincerely thank you for your time. 

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Unobscured Vision

No worries, it's no trouble at all. I'm keen to find out what the problem is myself. :yes: 

 

Usually Debian-based Distros are quite well-behaved. If it's a deficiency with Kali itself you'll want to make sure to let the Devs know about it. Usually it's something they can fix straightaway and move upstream (with updates). The fact that it was reproducible leads me to believe that it's a flaw in Kali and not something you did. Also, it survived 5 or 6 reboots, so it sounds to me like it's a dodgy update that they've got lurking in their repos somewhere.

 

Anyway. Enough of my mindless drooling. Lemme know if I can be of any further help. :) 

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