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Russia facing calls for all-out Rio ban

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DocM    12,644

http://us.afpmobile.com/pl/svt/si/afp/po/opnoram/sc/afp_en_internat/dk/afpmobile.07-22-2016.1649/ms/cSpSfSE1nh1/r/1469165581/pa/300796/uid/

 

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Russia was facing calls to be kicked out of the Olympics on Thursday after their highly-regarded track and field squad lost their appeal over being banned from Rio for state-sponsored doping.


The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruling on the athletics team is seen as a key indicator as the International Olympic Committee (IOC) debates whether to order a blanket ban on Russia from the Rio Games that start August 5.

The IOC executive board is to hold more talks on Sunday and a decision on a ban could be announced after, an Olympic spokesperson said.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) asked that the IOC "consider its responsibilities."

WADA said they were "satisfied" with the CAS decision, claiming it helps ensure a "level" playing field at next month's Games.

"It is now up to other international federations to consider their responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code as it relates to their Russian national federations and up to the International Olympic Committee... to consider its responsibilities under the Olympic Charter," the WADA statement said.

Fourteen national anti-doping agencies, including the United States, Canada and Germany, sent a joint letter to IOC President Thomas Bach on Thursday calling on him to ban Russia from Rio.

Citing the "short amount of time remaining" before the Games, "we believe it is appropriate and necessary for the IOC to take decisive action to uphold the Olympic Charter and the integrity of the Rio Olympic Games," said the letter, posted on the website of the anti-doping Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport.

The agencies also called for the establishment of a "task force" to "apply a uniform set of criteria to determine whether individual Russian athletes should be permitted to participate in the Rio Olympic Games under a neutral flag."

The other anti-doping agencies that signed the letter represent Austria, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland
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+Mirumir    5,157

That's a typical example of double standards and an extension of the West's conflict with Russia into the sphere of entertainment and sports.

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Torolol    926

I'm still looking for said adverse/negative/harmful side-effect of said mildronate/meldonium usages that make them an actual ban-worthy,

considering that newly banned meldonium has been manufactured since 70s, why no reports of its harmful side-effects for so long?

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techbeck    4,979

Russian Doctor Explains How He Helped Beat Doping Tests at the Sochi Olympics

 

Grigory Rodchenkov, the antidoping laboratory director, said that each night a sports official sent him a list of athletes whose samples needed to be swapped.

 

Athletes also sent photos of their doping control forms to help identify which urine sample were theirs.

 

Upon receiving a signal, usually after midnight, Dr. Rodchenkov went to Room 124. The room was officially a storage space, but he and his team had converted it into a laboratory.

 

Room 124 was next to the official sample collection room where the bottles of urine were kept.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/05/13/sports/russia-doping-sochi-olympics-2014.html

 

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+Zagadka    1,758

I don't blame them, I wouldn't want to go to Rio in its current state. 

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DocM    12,644
9 hours ago, Torolol said:

I'm still looking for said adverse/negative/harmful side-effect of said mildronate/meldonium usages that make them an actual ban-worthy,

considering that newly banned meldonium has been manufactured since 70s, why no reports of its harmful side-effects for so long?

It's not that it's necessarily harmful. It's a performance enhancing drug and those have been banned for ages. It dialates (makes larger in diameter) blood vessels, artificially  increasing blood flow to the muscles. In general; more flow, more endurance etc.

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+Mirumir    5,157
6 hours ago, DocM said:

It's not that it's necessarily harmful. It's a performance enhancing drug and those have been banned for ages...

Nope. It's an anti-ischemia medication and it's just recently been banned. Athletes use it in order to speed up muscle recovery time after training.

 

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Since 1 January 2016, it has been on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) list of substances banned from use by athletes. ... It is currently unscheduled in the US.

And then they retroactively applied the new ban to the Russian athletes and their samples from the past. Hence, the double standards, not to mention that the substance can be detected in the system several months after the last usage and the russian athletes simply didn't have enough time to clean their system in the period between the ban was first announced and became effective.

 

 

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DocM    12,644
Just now, Mirumir said:

Nope. It's an anti-ischemia medication and it's just recently been banned. Athletes use it in order to speed up muscle recovery time after training.

Ischemia is a reduction in blood flow. Mildronate increases blood flow, which while it can treat ischemia also improves performance during competition.

 

This kind of deflection and parsing is what got Russia in trouble.

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Melfster    484

Yep Russia really deserves to get banned for this.

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+Mirumir    5,157
1 minute ago, DocM said:

Ischemia is a reduction in blood flow. Mildronate increases blood flow, which while it can treat ischemia also improves performance during competition.

 

This kind of deflection and parsing is what got Russia in trouble.

Why was it banned just recently if it had been known since the 1970's?

 

Why did IAAF amend their rules shortly before making the final decision on Russia?

 

 

 

 

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DocM    12,644

It was already on the 2015 WADA list of drugs to be monitored then 13 of the medalists, and athletes in 15 of the 21 sports, at the 2015 Baku games had it in their system.

 

That's what set off the alarms.

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+Mirumir    5,157
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It was on the 2015 WADA list of drugs to be monitored

Most Russian athletes were unaware of this.

 

After the Baku, it was announced it would be banned on Jan 1. 2016 - an insufficient period of time required to rid the system of the substance. 

 

Then you have IAAF amending their rules in order to suit the anti-Russian agenda days before making the decision on Russia.

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Open Minded    939
17 hours ago, Mirumir said:

That's a typical example of double standards and an extension of the West's conflict with Russia into the sphere of entertainment and sports.

So "The West" told Russians to cheat?  That's weird.  And I thought the Olympics were international.

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+Mirumir    5,157
Just now, Open Minded said:

So "The West" told Russians to cheat?  That's weird.  And I thought the Olympics were international.

 

I'm sure common sense will prevail and clean Russian athletes will compete in the games. A blanket ban on the whole team is reminiscent of nazism.

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techbeck    4,979
Just now, Open Minded said:

So "The West" told Russians to cheat?  That's weird.  And I thought the Olympics were international.

Wasnt just Russia who used the drug and faced consequences.  They just used it the most.  Banned or not, the drug was abused and says a lot about the "athletes" who use the drug in order to compete. 

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DocM    12,644
9 hours ago, Mirumir said:

Most Russian athletes were unaware of this.

It's the job or the Russian Olympic Committee to inform them of this. They dropped the ball.

 

As for clearing, adding it to the watch list in 2015 didn't happen overnight - there had been discussions of that step going back even further. Russia knew it was heading for the watch list far enough ahead to preemptively stop using it. They just figured they could skate or bully their way out of it being enforced.

 

Oops.

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+Gary7    7,368

Rio is infested with that Zika virus, I would not go anywhere near that country.

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+FloatingFatMan    13,182
16 hours ago, Gary7 said:

Rio is infested with that Zika virus, I would not go anywhere near that country.

This. I'm surprised that all the female athletes at least, haven't dropped out. Who wants to take the risk of a damaged baby sometime in the future?

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+Mirumir    5,157
49 minutes ago, FloatingFatMan said:

This. I'm surprised that all the female athletes at least, haven't dropped out. Who wants to take the risk of a damaged baby sometime in the future?

Let's file it under the conspiracy to facilitate and speed up the spreading of Zika worldwide :D 

 

The pharma companies (and their shareholders) are already eagerly awaiting the next epidemic.

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+Gary7    7,368
6 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

This. I'm surprised that all the female athletes at least, haven't dropped out. Who wants to take the risk of a damaged baby sometime in the future?

Some Male Pro Golfers dropped out as well.

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+Mirumir    5,157

IOC washed their hands off the responsibility and delegated Team Russia's faith to sports federations.

 

A blanket ban is unlikely to happen at this point.

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+FloatingFatMan    13,182
35 minutes ago, Mirumir said:

IOC washed their hands off the responsibility and delegated Team Russia's faith to sports federations.

 

A blanket ban is unlikely to happen at this point.

This was the only sensible and fair option.

 

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The IOC also confirmed it will not allow whistleblower Yulia Stepanova to compete as a neutral athlete in Rio.

 

I think we can see what was going on here, no political shenanigans necessary... This person was clearly trying to throw attention off them and sneak in as an independent under the IOC flag.  

 

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PGHammer    207
On 7/22/2016 at 6:34 PM, DocM said:

It's not that it's necessarily harmful. It's a performance enhancing drug and those have been banned for ages. It dialates (makes larger in diameter) blood vessels, artificially  increasing blood flow to the muscles. In general; more flow, more endurance etc.

It is the same reason that blood thinners that are prescribed both for people and animals (such as Lasix) are banned in animals used in downstream consumption - not merely human consumption; some states and countries ban these same drugs from animals that compete in sport as well (Lasix is banned for use by horses that compete in international equestrian events - including the Olympics)

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LaP    1,707

I personally think it's stupid to ban all athletes because their leaders are corrupt.

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DocM    12,644

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2016/07/24/sport/russia-ioc-olympics-ban/

 

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No blanket ban on Russian athletes, IOC says

 

(CNN)-The International Olympic Committee will not issue a blanket ban on Russian athletes hoping to compete in the 2016 Olympic Games and will instead leave the decision on competitors' eligibility up to their respective sporting federations, the IOC said in a statement Sunday.
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However, Sunday's announcement means Russian athletes "will be accepted by the IOC" to compete in Rio if they can meet strict anti-doping criteria, have no doping history and are given the green light by their own sports governing body.
>

 

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