Can boot into linux cause of windows boot manager


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Sonyboyj

So i got Win8.1 i got uefi disabled secureboot turned off and fast boot off . yet when using unetbootin to boot into linux from the C: drive it dont work. it propmts me to boot into windows or unetbootin. i choose unet but then get a screen saying windows start up disk has issues. guessing cause win boot manager only accepts windows OS's. how do i get linux to boot . without usb or dvd

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Barney T.

Moved to the Linux / Unix Subforum

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Mindovermaster

Change your boot order in BIOS to the USB drive as first device. If that doesn't work, then you didn't install uNetbbotin correctly. This happened several times to me, just remake the USB flash drive.

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Farchord

UEFI or MBR?

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Mindovermaster
1 hour ago, Sonyboyj said:

So i got Win8.1 i got uefi disabled

 

34 minutes ago, Farchord said:

UEFI or MBR?

 

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Sonyboyj

i didnt put linux on a usb i told unet to put it and boot from C: drive. ive done it with win7 before

 

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chrisj1968

correct me if I'm wrong but, wouldn't be beneficial to install Linux first?

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Barney T.
13 minutes ago, chrisj1968 said:

correct me if I'm wrong but, wouldn't be beneficial to install Linux first?

When installing a dual-boot system, Windows is usually installed first. This is because Linux does a much better job with GRUB in setting up the bootloader. If you do it the other way, you have to manually reset Windows in the bootloader, which is not hard, but another step that isn't necessary if you install Windows first.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/214571/how-to-dual-boot-linux-on-your-pc/

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Haggis

use unetbootin to put it on a usb or hell burn it to a CD/DVD :)

 

should work fine from there

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Radium

It's easier to handle multi boot in UEFI since bootloaders can coexist. Each operating system install their bootloader and saves an entry in the UEFI's NVRAM which will show up as a boot entry when you press the boot menu key. The Linux kernel can be booted directly as well so a bootloader is not mandatory.

If you install distributions from Canonical or Redhat then you can keep secure boot on since their keys are trusted on modern machines. You can also sign UEFI-binaries yourself if your distribution doesn't come with a signed bootloader.

 

Sometimes, Windows will change the boot order on UEFI systems and some firmware allows you to make the boot order list write protected.

 

Linux works fine in UEFI. I have signed the GRUB UEFI binary with my own key and it allows me to have full system encryption (kernel & initramfs included) and secure boot on my laptop. Only a 5 MB signed binary is unencrypted.

 

If Windows was installed and booted with UEFI then turning off UEFI actually just enabled a compatibility systems modules that makes UEFI emulate a BIOS and Windows won't boot.

 

Remember, UEFI motherboards emulate BIOS, they don't have dual firmware.

 

I recommend that you use UEFI which allows you to use GPT which supports much larges drives and it has two copies of the partition table.

 

If you want to keep Windows then use UEFI if Windows was installed in UEFI mode. This will avoid having to switch between UEFI and CSM which only makes the boot process slower and adds unnecessary complexity.

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