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Hmmm .... ;) Let it Rock by Kevin Rudolf? Cause Falcon 9's bring the fire and take it higher? :D 

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Nawwww....The Imperial March from Star Wars!!

 

Florida Today....

 

Quote


SpaceX signs lease with Port Canaveral for booster refurbishing

SpaceX has signed a five-year lease for a warehouse and office facility at Port Canaveral, where it plans to process, refurbish and store rocket boosters for future reuse.

The commercial space company has occupied the 53,360-square-foot former SpaceHab building on the north side of the port since August, under a month-to-month lease, and has been renovating the facility, located at 620 Magellan Road.

Now, with the signed lease agreement, "they can forge ahead" with their plans, Port Canaveral Chief Executive Officer John Murray said.

The company also plans to build an adjacent 44,000-square-foot hangar on the 4-acre parcel.

Canaveral Port Authority commissioners are scheduled to vote Wednesday on the lease, which will take effect April 1.

Under terms of the lease, SpaceX will pay monthly rent to the port of $35,181 in Year 1, increasing to $50,639 a month by Year 5.

"It's a unique opportunity for our port to participate in the space industry," Murray said. "It's just great to be part of it. It's great to be in a strategic location that will be part of making history" for the space program.

SpaceX  formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp.  will be responsible for paying for and completing improvements to the complex. The port agreed to partially reimburse SpaceX for improvements, up to a maximum of $280,000 by deducting up to $10,000 a month in rent for the first 28 months of the lease.

SpaceX will have use of a nearby roadway for transporting SpaceX rocket boosters from a cargo dock to its facility, and will get exclusive use of the road for up to six hours while the rocket booster transport is taking place.

Murray said the port also has had "numerous inquiries from numerous companies" in the space industry interested in leasing at the port.

The agreement between SpaceX and the port includes two options to extend the lease by five years each time.

 

SpaceX_refurb_port_canaveral.thumb.jpg.ae4e42321a7f71e8e3a51ab1dd401a68.jpg

 

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OMG YESS! :yes: 

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By the time Blue arrives the port authority is going to be like 'Sorry boys, we're all rented out... maybe give Elon a call?'

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Music video: SPACEX: Launch You Up

 

 

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misc data...

 

 

 

C7hz5FjXQAAS4FY.jpg

image link

 

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That infographic really illustrates how crappy (expletive/descriptive removed) the current-gen ULA rockets are, and how unimaginative their ambitions down the road are. The only one worth anything will be Vulcan Block-2/ACES, and it'll likely be at 3x the cost/launch of a Falcon Heavy which is more capable by a factor of almost 2 -- before the switchover to the Raptor S2.

 

And the infographic hasn't taken into account a possible "mini-ITS" which is still a possibility (Saturn-V levels of capability -- 105~120T to LEO) or even ITS itself which could be used as a gargantuan SHLV, or even SLS for that matter. Vulcan/Centaur won't even FLY until 2021 at the earliest unless something changes at ULA to speed up the timetable. That line isn't even cutting metal yet, and the BE-4 won't start testing for a few weeks.

 

Nor does the infographic show New Glenn or anything else from Blue Origin; but there's been no stated timetable for Blue's next iteration.

 

Also absent is Orbital's name in the lineup anywhere ... but I don't think we're surprised at all by that little development, are we?

 

SpaceX will already be cutting metal on ITS by 2021 and doing Raptor testing for any sign of various anomalies (acoustic, etc) when adding groups of them together in the arrangements needed for ITS' first stage. :yes: ULA will be way, WAY behind the curve by then if their ambitions are merely on Vulcan/ACES .... and we don't exactly see Space X sitting on their laurels with the Falcon Heavy platform, do we? Expect improvements to that one over time. The best ULA can hope for is Second Place at this point. Once Falcon Heavy debuts, they're hosed. SLS is going to cost waaaaay too much to be allowed to fly often -- much to the annoyance of Shelby and the other OldSpace proponents who seem to think it was a good idea to keep funding it.

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Yup. Falcon 9 alone is giving ULA a migrane, and Falcon Heavy will be murder once EELV and NASA certified.

 

Add New Glenn, both the 2 and 3 stage versions, a mini-ITS cargo vehicle as a potential Falcon replacement, the ITS and New Armstrong and there isn't much left - all markets covered.

 

Some business for Vulcan to be sure, and Antares 300 could also be competitive at the lower mass to orbit end Falcon 9 v-1.0 covered.

 

I think OrbitalATK will abandon their Ares 1/Liberty clone, and Rocket Lab may well be the up and coming dark horse in the mix. 

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Yep. :yes:

 

This time next year we'll be reflecting on how much has gone on in the past 12 months, and what the next 18 months will have in store for us.

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The next 6 months should be more than exciting enough.

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