China National Space Administration CNSA (updates)


Recommended Posts

Draggendrop

Next Launch...

 

Quote

Nov. 20   Long March 3C • Tianlian 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site: Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket will launch China’s fourth Tianlian 1 data relay satellite. [Nov. 10]

http://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

----------------------

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote

[] Shenzhou 11 spacecraft will return to Earth on November 18. # Shenzhou11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote

[Xichang Satellite Launch Center / XSLC] CZ-3C II launcher. To be launched

 

 

--------------------------

 

China’s Shenzhou-11 crew set to return to Earth this week after record stay in space

 

Quote

China’s Shenzhou-11 mission astronauts Jing Haipeng and Chen Dong are set to return to Earth this week as their national record month-long stay aboard Tiangong-2 comes to an end.
 
Jing, who spent his 50th birthday in orbit, and Chen, 37, have spent almost four weeks aboard the Tiangong-2 space lab, which is a test bed for larger modules of the planned Chinese space station.
 
Aboard the country’s second space lab the pair have been carrying out a range of science experiments and tested out technology required for a large, permanently crewed space station, including a robotic arm for repair and maintenance.
 
Though China’s space authorities have not yet revealed the schedule for return, statements on the mission duration, coupled with clues from previous missions and orbital trajectories suggest the crew will return to their Shenzhou-11 spacecraft on Friday morning Beijing time. 

 

Quote

According to this time line, after undocking from Tiangong-2, the Shenzhou return capsule would then be used for re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere and a landing at the grasslands Siziwang Banner in Inner Mongolia on Saturday, where they will be met by recovery teams.
 
Conversely, rumours among amateur followers of the Chinese space programme in China suggest that the crew could return on November 18.

Shenzhou-11 launched on a Long March 2F rocket from Jiuquan on October 17 and docked two days later with the Tiangong-2 space lab, launched a month earlier, at an altitude of 390 kilometres.
 
The two previous Shenzhou missions, to Tiangong-1 in 2012 and 2013, had crews of three. Shenzhou-11 featured just two in order to extend the mission time to around 33 days and allow China to perform its first medium-term stay human spaceflight mission and collect valuable data for the future.

 

Quote

Special suits have allowed the astronauts to track the status and changes in their physical and cardiovascular condition.
 
Chinese state media report also that the range of foods and beverages had been greatly increased to over 100 for the extended mission.
 
Shenzhou-11 is China’s sixth human spaceflight mission, and the first since 2013. The next, Shenzhou-12, is not expected until after the CSS core module is in orbit sometime in 2018.

 

While Tiangong-2 will be vacated and unlikely to be visited again by astronauts, it will next year be part of another mission crucial for China’s space station plans.
 
In order to refuel and supply the CSS, China has developed a Tianzhou cargo vessel. Tianzhou-1 will be launched in April on a Long March 7 from Wenchang, before docking with Tiangong-2 and testing refuelling techniques required in order for the future CSS to maintain its orbit.
 
Tianzhou-1 will also carry its own science payloads, including a cell bioreactor for differentiation of mammal stem cells in microgravity, a two-phase fluid instrument for spacecraft fluid management, and an electrostatic levitation accelerometer.
 
Tiangong-2, which could remain in orbit for five years or more, will also continue a range of science missions. These include a thale cress experiment to study seed-to-seed growth in microgravity, and the international POLAR gamma-ray burst detector.

http://gbtimes.com/china/chinas-shenzhou-11-crew-set-return-earth-week-after-record-stay-space

 

------------------

 

From Tiangong-1

 

tiangong-1-shenzhou-10-docking.gif

Above: Shenzhou-10 docking with Tiangong-1 in June 2013.

 

 

shenzhou-10-return-wang-yaping-landing_3.jpg

Above: Wang Yaping after landing in the Shenzhou-10 return capsule.

 

--------------------------

 

Found this while going through articles...

 

 

:(

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

1479284088139656.jpg

Shenzhou spacecraft on the 11th will be held November 18 13: 33-14: 13 return to Earth.

 

https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/manned-spacecraft/SZ11-launch.html

 

---------------------------------

 

 

 

Quote

Technology + fashion multifunctional space suit into the Templehttps://goo.gl/6LZ2dV 

 

------------------------------

 

Will update when more info available on the re-entry.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

Landing in about 1 hour.....will update later.

 

 

China's Manned Spacecraft Detaches from Tiangong-2 Space Lab

video is 1:28 min.

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese Astronauts in Tiangong-2 Prepare for Return to Earth

video is 2:01 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Watch live: Chinese astronauts heading back to Earth

 

Quote

Two Chinese astronauts will close out a month in space Friday with a planned parachute-assisted landing in northern China’s remote Inner Mongolia region, a day after the crew departed the Tiangong 2 space lab to begin the trip home.

 

The two-man team finished their experiments this week, a slate of tests and investigations aimed at a range of scientific and engineering disciplines, and cleaned up the Tiangong 2 module before closing hatches leading to their Shenzhou 11 space capsule, the ship they flew into space Oct. 16 atop a Long March 2F rocket.

 

Shenzhou 11 detached from the Tiangong 2 space lab at 0441 GMT Thursday (11:41 p.m. EST Wednesday). China has not officially disclosed the mission’s landing time, but airspace closure notices point to a touchdown some time between 0533 GMT (12:33 a.m. EST) and 0613 GMT (1:13 a.m. EST) Friday.

 

Jing Haipeng, the mission commander, is wrapping up his third mission after setting the record for the most cumulative time in space by a Chinese citizen. Crewmate Chen Dong is concluding his first spaceflight.

 

Both are Chinese Air Force pilots selected for the country’s astronaut corps.

 

The astronauts are coming back to Earth after completing China’s longest piloted space mission to date, more than doubling the country’s previous mark.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/11/18/shenzhou-11-landing/

 

 

 

Also live at...

http://english.cctv.com/live/index.shtml

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-out comm phase over in a few minutes....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Two Chinese astronauts back on Earth

 

135840494_14794763064911n.jpg

China’s spacecraft recovery team works around the Shenzhou 11 landing capsule Friday after its touchdown in Inner Mongolia. Credit: Xinhua

 

Quote

Two Chinese astronauts closed out a month in space Friday with a parachute-assisted landing in northern China’s remote Inner Mongolia territory, a day after the crew departed the Tiangong 2 space lab to begin the trip home.

 

The two-man team finished their experiments this week, a slate of tests and investigations aimed at a range of scientific and engineering disciplines, and cleaned up the Tiangong 2 module before closing hatches leading to their Shenzhou 11 space capsule, the ship they flew into space Oct. 16 atop a Long March 2F rocket.

 

Shenzhou 11 detached from the Tiangong 2 space lab at 0441 GMT Thursday (11:41 p.m. EST Wednesday), then headed for landing in Inner Mongolia’s Siziwang Banner region.

 

The capsule touched down at 0559 GMT (12:59 a.m. EST; 1:59 p.m. Beijing time) Friday, according to China’s state-run Xinhua news agency.

“Shenzhou 11 has landed successfully, and the two astronauts are all in good shape, and I would like to declare the mission of Tiangong 2 and Shenzhou 11 has achieved a complete success,” said General Zhang Youxia, chief commander of China’s human spaceflight program.

 

In remarks at Beijing mission control, Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli hailed the success of Shenzhou 11, saying it “showed our capability in cutting edge space technology.”

 

Jing Haipeng, the mission commander, wrapped up his third mission after setting the record for the most cumulative time in space by a Chinese citizen with 47 days. Crewmate Chen Dong concluded his first spaceflight.

 

Both are Chinese Air Force pilots selected for the country’s astronaut corps.

 

Quote

The 32-day flight helped set the stage for China’s planned space station, which could have its centerpiece module launched as soon as 2018, with part-time astronauts visits beginning soon after. The final pieces of the research complex, which will include the core module, two science labs and ports to receive robotic cargo ships and crew capsules, should be in orbit by 2022.

 

Once fully operational, the station will be able to host three astronauts for up to six months at a time, and perhaps six crew members for shorter durations.

 

China’s Shenzhou spaceships are similar in design to Russian Soyuz spacecraft, with three major sections: a descent module housing the crew couches and cockpit controls, a habitation module containing living space, and a propulsion and commodities section with solar panels, rocket thrusters, and tanks for fuel, water and gases.

 

But the Chinese ship is slightly larger than the Soyuz, stretching about 30 feet (9 meters) long with a solar array wingspan of 55 feet (17 meters).

 

sz11_capsulesep.jpg

The Shenzhou 11 landing capsule is seen separating from the spacecraft’s propulsion module in this on-board camera view. Credit: CCTV

 

Quote

Before leaving Tiangong 2, Jing and Chen cleaned up the research lab and readied it for standalone operations.

 

“We need to sweep Tiangong clean before leaving and take away items that should be taken away; this is very important. Some trash, if left aboard Tiangong, will be dangerous,” Jing told Xinhua in this week’s interview from aboard Tiangong 2. “To make Tiangong’s follow-up tasks possible, they must be taken away. Residual food waste, sanitary product waste, and some trash created during in-orbit experiments, including batteries and electrodes, will be packed and placed in the orbital compartment.”

 

“Setting up the conditions before departure is similar to turning off the water and electricity before leaving a house for a long time,” Chen said.

 

“Tiangong 2 will be used in the long-term and dock with space cargo ships. We have to make sure that electricity, water, gas and communications are set up properly. In total there are 40-50 conditions to set up.”

 

Tiangong 2 should continue its mission for at least two years, and Chinese engineers are preparing to send the country’s first automated cargo craft to the space lab in April. The Tianzhou 1 supply ship, similar to Russia’s Progress cargo freighters, will demonstrate refueling and resupply procedures to show that China can support and service a permanently-occupied space station.

 

There are also more research experiments aboard Tiangong 2, including a payload named POLAR built to detect gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful explosions in the universe.

 

Developed by scientists in China, Switzerland and Poland, the detector weighs about 70 pounds (30 kilograms) and will help astrophysicists resolve the origin of bright gamma-ray flashes emanating from distant galaxies. Scientists believe most gamma-ray bursts, which can vary in length from milliseconds to hours, occur during supernovas, when stars explode and leave behind a super-dense neutron star or black hole.

 

“We hope to obtain accurate polarization information of the gamma-ray bursts for the first time ever to better understand the process of how the violent explosions happen,” said Zhang Shuangnan, principal investigator on the POLAR project and a chief scientist at the High Energy Physics Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in a report published by Xinhua.

 

The schedule for China’s next human spaceflight mission has not been announced, but Chinese astronauts could start flying to the core module of the country’s next-generation space station by 2019. Other piloted Shenzhou missions could fly before then.

 

China has announced its space station will be “fully open” for international cooperation, and officials from the European Space Agency and Russia have expressed interest in flying their astronauts on the Chinese outpost, which could ramp up to full capacity just as the International Space Station is decommissioned in the mid-2020s.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/11/18/shenzhou-11-landing/

 

Shenzhou-11 astronauts land safely in Inner Mongolia

video is 1:08 min.

 

 

 

 

Video: Highlights of Shenzhou-11 spacecraft’s re-entry

video is 4:48 min.

 

 

 

-------------------------------------

 

 

 

CHINA'S DEEP SPACECRAFT WILL BE GUIDED BY X-RAY PULSES FROM DISTANT STARS

 

Quote

To support its big plans for deep space exploration, including a manned Lunar mission and the Martian lander, China just launched the world's first x-ray navigation system. The X-ray Pulsar Navigation 1 (XPNAV 1) satellite, which the country launched on Nov. 10 aboard a solid-fueled Long March 11 rocket from the Jiuquan Space Launch Center in the Gobi Desert, is the world's first x-ray navigation system to go in orbit, beating out NASA's Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT), which is scheduled to be installed on the ISS next year.

 

Quote

The navigation system relies on x-ray pulsars found in systems with two stars. Essentially a dense neutron star's strong magnetic field pulls in gas from the other star, and when the gas impacts the neutron star, it generates a strong X-ray hotspot. If the neutron star's spin axis and magnetic axis are not aligned, as the neutron star rotates, pulses will be generated as the X-ray hotspots move in and out of the observer's view. This turns out to be a useful tool for navigation.


Millisecond pulsars generate x-ray pulses at such short intervals, that by measuring the time differential from multiple known pulsars (like a GPS using pulsars instead of satellites), a spacecraft can determine its location in the solar system within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles), which is pretty good for deep space. The trick is to find pulsars that provide pulses at a consistent pace; x-ray pulsars often speed up or slow down the frequency of their bursts.

 

xpnav_1.jpg

XPNAV-1
The XPNAV-1's five- to ten-year mission has two purposes: to gather data on 26 x-ray pulsars for use in x-ray navigation and to use that data to independently verify XPNAV-1's orbit.   China Academy of Satellite Technology

 

Quote

If all goes as planned, the XPNAV 1 will both gather data to build the pulsar x-ray database and then be able to use that data to independently verify its location. The 529-pound satellite has two detectors to measure x-rays generated by pulsars. Over the next five to ten years, XPNAV 1 will build a database of x-rays from 26 pulsars, measuring their frequencies against other electromagnetic activity in space. It will also measure the accuracy and consistency of pulsar x-rays against background space noise, without having to worry about atmospheric interference. It will verify the usability of the data by testing the data to see if the data can predict the satellite's location, independent of other navigation aids.

 

Quote

The advantages of x-ray navigation include greater accuracy and reliability; spacecraft wouldn't need to rely on radio signals that take longer to travel into deep space and lose signal fidelity. X-ray navigation is also cheaper, because the spacecraft would no longer need large, expensive ground-based radio antennae for navigation signals. Additionally, the spacecraft would be more autonomous, saving bandwidth for the transmission of scientific data back to earth. The success of XPNAV 1 would mean that not only has China achieved a major milestone in space technology, but it could also allow Chinese taikonauts and robotic probes to travel more freely beyond orbit.

http://www.popsci.com/chinas-launches-first-x-ray-navigation-system

 

-------------------------------------

 

China to select new astronauts in 2017

 

Quote

BEIJING, Nov. 18 (Xinhua) -- China will start a third round of astronaut selection in 2017, an official from the Astronaut Center of China said Friday.

 

Huang Weifen, deputy chief designer of the astronaut system with the center, made the announcement at a press conference after the Tiangong-2 and Shenzhou-11 mission came to completion on Friday afternoon.

 

In preparation for the manned space station program, the new selection process will pick candidates from air force pilots, space engineers and technical staff in aerospace-related fields.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-11/18/c_135841116.htm

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision

That was some fairly obnoxious music. :laugh:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Next Launch...

 

Quote

Nov. 22   Long March 3C • Tianlian 1
Launch window: Approx. 1530 GMT (10:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket will launch China’s fourth Tianlian 1 data relay satellite. [Nov. 19]

http://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

---------------------------

 

 

Quote

November 20, the return capsule returned to Beijing Aerospace Science and Technology of the five branches (the CAST) 

 

 

------------------------------

 

 

Quote

[Xichang Satellite Launch Center / XSLC] Long March III (CZ-3C) rocket ready to go. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

---------------------------------

 

 

 

 

China launches world’s longest quantum communication line

 

Quote

China today launched a 712-km quantum communication line, stated to be the world’s longest secure telecommunications network, which boasts of ultra-high security making it impossible to wiretap, intercept or crack the information transmitted through them.

 

The new quantum communication line links Hefei, capital of Anhui province, to Shanghai, the country’s financial hub.

 

It is part of a 2,000-km quantum communication line connecting Beijing and Shanghai, according to Chen Yu’ao, professor at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei and chief engineer of the Beijing-Shanghai quantum communication line.

 

The 712-km line has 11 stations and it took three years of construction, Mr. Chen said.

 

Quantum communication lines boasts ultra-high security.

 

It is impossible to wiretap, intercept or crack the information transmitted through them.

 

Experts from 18 countries witnessed a secure remote video meeting between Hefei and Shanghai via the quantum line at a recent international conference on quantum technology.

 

The Beijing-Shanghai quantum communication line is expected to be completed at the end of this year.

 

In August, China successfully launched the world’s first quantum satellite. It was nicknamed “Micius” after a fifth century BC Chinese philosopher and scientist.

 

The Beijing-Shanghai quantum communication line will be connected to the satellite through the line’s station in Beijing, enabling the space-to-Earth quantum communication network.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/china-launches-worlds-longest-quantum-communication-line/article9367306.ece

 

-----------------------------

 

In Southwest China, A 'Very Large Eyeball' Peers Into Deep Space

 

2387587-kuhn-199-edit_custom-91b459e535cc11ade788f91f8a03816fa207c055-s800-c85.jpg

The world's largest radio telescope is nestled among the jagged, green mountains of southwest China's Guizhou Province.
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

 

Quote

In the year 1054, Chinese astronomers of the Song Dynasty recorded a star in the sky so bright that it was visible to the naked eye even during daytime for several weeks.

 

China was the world's leading scientific power at that time. But its people also saw astronomical events as omens of earthly affairs. And so the astronomers carefully recorded the location of the star and the time it was visible.

 

Now fast-forward to the present day. China has just built the world's largest radio telescope. Known as the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, or FAST, it looks like a giant silver dish, nestled among the jagged, green mountains of southwest China's Guizhou Province.

 

The exploding star or supernova seen in 1054 has become another kind of star, a pulsar, which emits not light but radio waves that are picked up by China's new telescope. China is investing heavily in huge projects like the telescope to reclaim the leading position in science that it held throughout much of history.

 

"Accurate records of astronomical observations may still be useful a thousand years later," says the telescope project's lead scientist, Zhu Ming, who hopes to leave similar records for posterity.

 

"I expect that we will discover many new things," he says. Among them, Zhu says, the telescope will help discover thousands of new galaxies and will observe the hydrogen clouds from which stars and planets are born.

 

That's awhile off. For now, Zhu and his team must perform thousands of tests to calibrate and focus the telescope to maximize its sensitivity.

 

Quote

Zhu showed me the telescope, which cost a reported $180 million to build, on a recent visit.

 

"The circular beam we're looking at is a support structure," he said, as we stood on the rim of the huge dish. "It supports a network of more than 2,000 cables. The cables are covered with more than 4,450 panels. The cables can be pulled to adjust the shape of the dish."

 

This allows the telescope to focus on an object and track it across the sky for up to six hours, as the earth turns.

 

Scientists used satellites to scour the country for just the right location for the dish, Zhu says.

 

"You've got a town just two or three miles from here," Zhu explains, "and the signals from the cell phones, microwave ovens, cars, cameras and digital devices there would all be too great, if not for these mountains."

 

In other words, the province's karst mountains serve as a sort of natural egg cup, surrounding the telescope and blocking out interference — which Zhu points out is thousands of times stronger than the faint radio signals coming from the far reaches of the universe.

 

Next, we drive down a spiraling road that leads to the bottom of the dish, where there is a receiver module, suspended by cables above the dish to pick up signals. Then it's lowered to the bottom for maintenance.

 

The dish's aluminum panels are full of holes. When the wind blows through them, it generates an eerie, buzzing roar that seems straight out of a sci-fi soundtrack.

 

Not far from the dish is its control center. Here, clusters of supercomputers surrounding the main control room process the data – millions of gigabytes each day, representing the radio traffic of the universe that is picked up by the telescope.

 

2387587-kuhn-113-edit_custom-253cea8d09a13582c3d3353f8a644cdbb7073f11-s1200.jpg

The telescope is made up of 2,000-plus cables covered with more than 4,450 panels. "The cables can be pulled to adjust the shape of the dish," lead scientist Zhu Ming says.
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

 

 

2387587-kuhn-305-edit_custom-0dff00942cf1a647f551a24f4f246c523a1002b5-s800-c85.jpg

Lead scientist Zhu Ming sits in the telescope's control center. Clusters of supercomputers process millions of gigabytes of data each day, representing the radio traffic of the universe that is picked up by the telescope.
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

 

Quote

"We're looking out into space about nine or 10 billion years back into the history of the universe," says Peter Quinn, Director of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research at the University of Western Australia, which helped build the telescope's receivers and data processing systems.

 

As the universe is about 13.7 billion years old, that means the telescope will be able to see back almost to the universe's beginnings. "It's obviously a very large eyeball," Quinn says.

 

He and other foreign scientists will have access to some of the project's data.

 

Quinn says telescope-building has recently entered a golden age, producing tools that are many times more powerful than those of a generation or so ago. But he adds that making scientific breakthroughs requires more than just technology. It also takes human curiosity and a good bit of luck.

 

"The most enduring characteristic of telescopes, over the history of people building telescopes, seems to be that they always find things we don't expect," he says.

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/11/16/501619343/in-southwest-china-a-very-large-eyeball-peers-into-deep-space

 

----------------------------------

 

CHINA MAKES BREAKTHROUGH WITH "ARTIFICIAL SUN"

 

gettyimages-614675294.jpg

Photo Credit: Getty Images

 

Quote

In China, have been able to obtain high-confinement plasma for a record length of time. This will promote the research of international thermonuclear fusion.

 

The experiment was conducted using China’s Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) which is an experimental thermonuclear fusion reactor that replicates the sun's energy-generating process.

 

The experiment was able to demonstrate the sustainability of plasma in the H-mode confinement regime for over a minute.

 

This will be key to the success of the largest international program for this type of experiment, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). It will also be a major step for fusion studies, according to People.cn.

 

This is not the first time this has happened, as in 2012, a similar experiment lasted 32 seconds, breaking the world record. Since then, they have been updating it.

 

The study was run by the Institute of Plasma Physics in Hefei, which is aiming for plasma pulses that will last up to 1,000 seconds.

http://www.i4u.com/2016/11/117048/china-makes-breakthrough-artificial-sun

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Material and plant samples retrieved from space experiments

 

Quote

Samples from space material and plant growth experiments carried out on China's space lab Tiangong-2 are in good condition and have been delivered to scientists for further research, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) said Saturday.

 

The material and plant samples were retrieved after the successful landing of the Shenzhou-11 spacecraft's reentry module Friday.

 

According to CAS, 12 out of 18 material samples sent to space via Tiangong-2 in September, including semiconductor, nano and thin film materials, were taken back for study, while the other six will remain in space to test their physical and chemical features in zero gravity for future development of material processing techniques.

 

Seeds of thale cress, a kind of flowering plant, have grown into pods after 48 days of cultivation in space, said CAS, adding that scientists will continue to grow the pods in the laboratory.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Material_and_plant_samples_retrieved_from_space_experiments_999.html

 

 

 

-------------------------------------

 

Launched...

 

Quote

Nov. 22   Long March 3C • Tianlian 1
Launch window: Approx. 1530 GMT (10:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket will launch China’s fourth Tianlian 1 data relay satellite. [Nov. 19]

http://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

 

China's fourth launch of November puts 4th Tianlian-1 tracking and relay sat in orbit

 

Quote

China on Tuesday launched its Tianlian-1 (04) data tracking and relay communications satellite from Xichang, marking its fourth mission of the month and a national record-equalling 19th launch for the calendar year so far.

 

Tianlian-1 (04) was launched on a Long March 3C rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in Sichuan province at 23:24 local time (15:24 UTC) towards a geostationary orbit.

 

Chinese media announced the launch was a success a little under an hour after liftoff. 

 

The satellite is the fourth in the Chinese series tracking and data relay satellites which, from geosynchronous orbit, provide close to real-time communications between the ground and spacecraft, and are used in particular for Shenzhou human spaceflight missions.

 

Tianlian-1 (04) is a replacement for the first in the series, which was launched in 2008. The satellites are developed by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST), with further spacecraft details at Nasaspaceflight.com.

 

After a period of live Chinese mission launches and events - including the Tiangong-2 space lab, Shenzhou-11 crewed flight and the docking of the two craft, the Long March 5 debut and Shenzhou-11 landing - followers had to resort to indirect methods of tracking events in Xichang, with the first indication of launch coming from startled lcoals on social media.

 

Quote

China's orbital launches in 2016

01. Belintersat-1 for Belarus
02. Beidou-21 navigation satellite
03. Beidou-22 navigation satellite
04. Shijian-10 retrievable space science satellite
05. Yaogan Weixing-30 remote sensing satellite
06. Ziyuan-3 remote sensing satellite and Aleph-1
07. Beidou-23 navigation satellite
08. Long March 7 debut flight, with new scale crew return capsule
09. Shijian-16 satellite
10. Tiantong-1-01 communications satellite
11. Gaofen-3 Earth observation satellite
12. Quantum Science Satellite (QUESS)
13. Gaofen-10 Earth observation satellite (launch failure)
14. Tiangong-2 space lab
15. Shenzhou-11
16. Long March 5 heavy-lift rocket debut, carrying Shijian-17
17. XPNAV-1 pulsar navigation test satellite
18. Yunhai-1 weather satellite
19. Tianlian-1 (04)

http://gbtimes.com/china/chinas-fourth-launch-november-puts-4th-tianlian-1-tracking-and-relay-sat-orbit

 

 

Chinese Long March 3C launches fourth Tianlian Data Relay Satellite

 

001825efr6esuejxp11x1x.jpg

Photo: 9ifly.cn

 

Quote

China launched its fourth Tianlian-1 tracking and data relay satellite on Tuesday atop a Long March 3C rocket blasting off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center at 15:24 UTC on a half-hour climb to a highly elliptical transfer orbit.

 

China’s Tianlian System, in its design and functionality, is very similar to the American Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System, comprised of satellites in Geostationary Orbit that are tasked with locking onto the uplink of lower-orbiting satellites and relaying different types of communication to ground stations and vice versa with telecommands sent from the ground to the relay satellite and then to the target spacecraft.

 

Tianlian, like the American TDRSS and Russian Luch, enables real-time communications between orbiting spacecraft and the ground which is crucial for human spaceflight operations as well as satellite missions, e.g. obtaining reconnaissance images or weather data within minutes of acquisition

indepth analysis...

http://spaceflight101.com/long-march-3c-launches-tianlian-1-4/

 

and ...

 

Long March 3C launches fourth Tianlian-1 spacecraft

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/11/long-march-3c-launches-tianlian-1/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote

100th Xichang launch day chain 04 Star One

 

 

 

 

Quote

gif action figure

 

 

 

 

Quote

One day chain 01 Star launch in 2008, the design life of six years, has been extended service more than two years in orbit. 04 Star Relay Satellite System is the first generation of backup star, 01 star main alternative to ensure Relay Satellite System smooth transition from the second generation of the first generation. After the launch day chain 01 Star II.

 

:)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Draggendrop

Bits and Bytes....

 

China to launch satellite to monitor earthquakes from space

 

Quote

China will launch a satellite this year to gather electromagnetic data that may be used in monitoring and forecasting earthquakes, the country’s first space-based platform for monitoring tremors.

 

According to China’s earthquake administrative agencies, the satellite will be launched in the latter half of this year.

 

Movements of the Earth’s crust generate electromagnetic radiation which can be observed from space. By collecting data on the Earth’s electromagnetic field, ionosphere plasma and high-energy particles, the satellite will be used in real-time monitoring of earthquakes and possible seismic precursors in China and neighbouring regions.

 

The satellite will be China’s first space-based platform for earthquake monitoring, providing a new approach for research, state-run Xinhua news agency reported today.

 

According to Shen Xuhui, deputy chief of the mission, it is designed to remain in orbit for five years and record the electromagnetic situation of earthquakes above 6 magnitude in China and quakes above 7 magnitude all over the world.

 

Scientists are expecting to find common factors that may be used to develop earthquake forecasting technology, Shen said.

 

The satellite may also serve aerospace and navigation communication purposes, the report said.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/china-to-launch-satellite-to-monitor-earthquakes-from-space/story-HktlNOLuNcarP5FyacSJqJ.html

 

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-01/17/c_135990563.htm

 

----------------------------------

 

China receives imagery from high-resolution remote sensing satellites

 

Quote

BEIJING, Jan. 11 (Xinhua) -- China has received images from a pair of 0.5-meter high-resolution remote sensing satellites launched in late December last year, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) said Wednesday.

 

Tourists were seen visiting the Potala Palace in Tibet Autonomous Region in the captured images.

 

The satellites, SuperView-1 01/02, on the back of a Long March 2D rocket lifted off from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province .

 

The two are operating at an altitude of 500 kilometers, with a panchromatic resolution of 0.5 meters and multispectral resolution of two meters, said Zhang Xiaomin, vice general manager of the Dongfanghong Satellite Co., Ltd under the CASC.

 

The China Siwei Surveying and Mapping Technology Co. Ltd, which is also under the CASC, is in charge of commercial operation of the satellites.

 

Xu Wen, general manager of China Siwei, said the satellites will provide services in a number of fields from environmental monitoring to disaster mitigation.

 

In China, there is a huge demand on remote sensing data, which, until now, came from foreign sources.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-01/11/c_135974337.htm

 

--------------------------------

 

China preparing 2017 Moon sample return mission with Chang'e-5

 

change5-progress-jan2-cctv-7.png

Scientists work on China's Chang'e-5 landing and ascent vehicles. (Photo: Framegrab/CCTV)

 

Quote

Scientists in China are engaged in intense preparations for the launch of the Chang'e-5 lunar probe in the second half of 2017, state media report.
 
The complex mission will involve a number of stages and components that will combine to land on and collect samples from the Moon, before ascending, a docking in lunar orbit, and heading home.
 
A new report by China Central Television (CCTV) shows work on the lander, ascent stage and re-entry vehicle needed for a successful mission.
 
“The lander and ascender form a combination that will land on the moon to conduct unmanned sample collection mission,” Ruan Jianhua, deputy chief designer of Chang’e-5, told CCTV, with the samples taken back to Earth by the re-entry capsule.

 

change5-progress-jan2-cctv-6_0.png

Above: The Chang'e-5 reentry capsule (Framegrab/CCTV).

 

Quote

After landing at Siziwang Banner, Inner Mongolia - the same area where China's crewed Shenzhou missions touch down - the samples will be taken to laboratories. 

 

"Once the samples are back, we can begin our analysis right away." Ouyang Ziyuan, a cosmochemist and chief scientist of China's Lunar Exploration Project (CLEP), told press in October.


'Orbit, land, return'

 

Chang’e-5 marks the third phase of a Chinese project to first orbit, then land and rove, and finally retrieve samples from the surface of the Moon.

 

Chang'e-1 and -2 first orbited and mapped the Moon in 2007 and 2010 respectively, before the Chang'e-3 soft landed in December 2013, setting a lander and the Yutu, or Jade Rabbit, rover on the surface.

 

Quote

The mission will be the first to collect samples from the Moon since the early 1970s, when US crewed and Soviet Union robotic missions gathered and returned lunar materials.
 
While marking the culmination of China’s first lunar exploration project, Chang’e-5 will, as well as testing necessary techniques for potential future crewed missions, provide experience for missions beyond the Earth-Moon system.
 
“We will later conduct research of Mars and other asteroids. We expect to go further in the exploration of deep space,” Ruan says.
 
Chinese robotic activity on the Moon will not end with Chang’e-5, however. In 2018 China will attempt the first ever landing on the lunar far side with Chang’e-4, using the back-up lander and rover for the ongoing Chang’e-3 mission, and a relay satellite positioned beyond the Moon to facilitate communications.

 

Quote

Renewed focus on the Moon

 

China is not the only country interested in exploring our celestial neighbour. India is developing its first landing and roving mission, Chandrayaan-2, while Japan's JAXA could launch two missions before the end of the decade.

 

NASA is working on a range of missions to launch in the coming years, including Lunar Flashlight, a cubesat orbiter to investigate ice deposits, along with three other small Moon-bound payloads as part of the first test of the Space Launch System.
 
A host of private entities are also competing for the $30 million Lunar XPrize, sponsored by Google, with four teams from Israel (SpaceIL), the US (Moon Express), India (Team Indus) and an international consortium (Synergy Moon) earning launch contracts for 2017 in a race to operate a rover on the Moon.

more at the link...

http://gbtimes.com/china/china-preparing-2017-moon-sample-return-mission-change-5

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

China’s Quantum Communications Trailblazer declared Operational after Stellar Performance

 

135994394_14847828719931n-512x343.jpg

Quantum Communications Session with a Quantum Ground Station near Xinglong in north China’s Hebei Province – Photo: Xinhua/Jin Liwang

 

Quote

China’s Quantum Science Satellite was declared operational this week after five months of in-orbit testing, now set for a busy two-year mission demonstrating hack-proof communications by means of entangled photons as a trailblazer for what is widely considered the communications technology of the future.

 

The Quantum Science Satellite, nicknamed Mozi, was launched into orbit on August 15, 2016 as the world’s first dedicated quantum communications testbed, embarking on an ambitious mission dedicated to validating the principles of quantum communications across vast distances of open space.

 

Within two weeks of its successful launch, the 640-Kilogram satellite conducted its first communication tests, demonstrating that it is capable of engaging in quantum communications by creating entangled photon pairs over great distances.

 

135994394_14847828720081n-512x364.jpg

Photo: Xinhua/Jin Liwang (Tibet Ground Station)

 

Quote

Long exposure photos of the communication tests with the satellite were nothing short of spectacular with the satellite streaking across the sky, sending down a green laser beam, while the ground station beams up a red targeting beacon that ensures the 20-centimeter telescope on the satellite can remain locked on the ground station and vice versa, ensuring a continuous link while the satellite passes overhead.

 

The China Academy of Science announced on Wednesday that the Quantum Communications Satellite was officially declared operational after a complete testing program of the satellite’s payload and the space-to-ground links with different ground stations. According to CAS, everything aboard the satellite is working to specification and initial tests suggest that the performance of the quantum payload is much better than anticipated prior to launch.

more at the link...

http://spaceflight101.com/quantum-science-satellite-declared-operational/

 

‘Much better than expected’: Chinese ‘hack-proof’ quantum communication satellite put into service

https://www.rt.com/news/374167-china-quantum-satellite-operational/

 

-----------------------------

 

Beijing's space program soars in 2016

 

Quote

In 2016, the Chinese government launched a whole array of major space-related projects which proved to be successful, Russian military expert Vasily Kashin told Sputnik China.

 

In 2016, China started tests of its first heavy-lift Long March-5 rocket. The successful completion of the launch vehicle will pave the way for the construction of a Chinese space station, Kashin told Sputnik China. He also cited tests of the country's solid-propellant rockets.

 

Earlier this year, China was the first to launch a quantum communication satellite into orbit, as well as a satellite for conducting EmDrive engine tests, according to Kashin. 2016 also saw a manned mission on board the Chinese orbital module Tiangong-2, where a cold atom interferometer was installed for possible scientific purposes, including those related to detecting submarines.

 

This year, China ranked second after Russia in terms of its number of successful space launches, while the number of Chinese satellites in orbit outstripped Russia in 2014. Since then, it has been strengthening its positon, Kashin said.

 

In 2016, it was confirmed that China had created its first experimental missile early warning satellite, according to him.

"These satellites are equipped with sensitive infrared sensors to register the missile launches. Presumably, the satellite was launched in late 2015," Kashin said. He also cited China's efforts to put new types of reconnaissance satellites into orbit and test new anti-satellite weapons and the regular testing of such systems. According to the US, statements are expected in the near future.

 

"So it's safe to say that 2016 proved to be a successful year for the Chinese space industry, which will be developed further, in 2017," Kashin pointed out.

 

Next year may see the launch of a lunar mission of the Chinese automatic station Chang'e-5 and the first automatic cargo ship Tianzhou, as well as the continuation of construction of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the expansion of the network of Chinese reconnaissance satellites, he said.

 

"The Chinese space program gradually comes to the fore in the world. China's shift to new generations of rockets will help reduce the use of a toxic rocket fuel called heptyl. It should be noted in this context that the second stage of the Long March-5 rocket uses an innovative and environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel, Kashin said.

more at the link...

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Chinese_Rockets_Beijings_Space_Program_Soars_Into_the_Air_in_2016_999.html

 

---------------------------

 

China's first cargo spacecraft to leave factory

 

cargo-spacecraft-tianzhou-1-lg.jpg

The take-off weight of Tianzhou-1 is 13 tonnes and it can ship material of up to six tonnes.

 

Quote

China's first cargo spacecraft will leave the factory, according to the website of China's manned space mission.

 

A review meeting was convened last Thursday, during which officials and experts unanimously concluded that the Tianzhou-1 cargo spacecraft had met all the requirements to leave the factory.

 

The take-off weight of Tianzhou-1 is 13 tonnes and it can ship material of up to six tonnes.

 

The spacecraft, which is scheduled to be launched in April from the southern province of Hainan, will dock with the Tiangong-2 space lab and refuel it.

 

It will be a crucial step for China in building a space station by 2020, as cargo spacecraft are required to ship necessities for astronauts aboard the space station.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Chinas_first_cargo_spacecraft_to_leave_factory_999.html

 

---------------------------

 

Russia, China Work on Joint High-Precision Satellite Navigation System

 

glonass-navigation-satellite-600-lg.jpg

File image

 

Quote

Russia and China are in the process of setting up a joint Differential Corrections and Monitoring (SDCM) high-precision satellite navigation system, China National Space Administration (CNSA) chief representative in Russia Zhang Yuan said Tuesday.

 

"We are not in the process of implementing [the system]," Zhang told RIA Novosti in response to a question on the time frame for building the system's first six ground stations. Plans for the system were first mentioned in 2015.

 

In September, the Russian Space Systems (RSS) company said talks were ongoing. RSS deputy head engineer Grigory Stupak said that high precision would be achieved by expanding the two countries' network of SDCM system stations working with the Russian Glonass and Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation systems.

 

The system, intended for use by the BRICS group of countries and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, is planned to have a positioning accuracy of around 1 meter (3.3 feet) and will start with the creation of three Russian stations in China and three Chinese stations in Russia. Further 46 SDCM ground stations are planned to be constructed in Russia and eight more on its neighboring countries' territories.

 

The Glonass project, which was launched in 1993, is operated by the Russian Aerospace Forces and consists of 27 satellites, 24 of which are operational. The system allows real-time positioning and speed data for surface, sea and airborne objects around the world.

 

BeiDou currently provides navigation services within China and the neighboring regions. After completion, the project would become an equivalent of GPS, Glonass and Europe's Galileo. In May last year, China and Russia signed the BeiDou-Glonass system compatibility and interoperability cooperation agreement, marking a new stage of navigation cooperation between the two countries.

http://www.gpsdaily.com/reports/Russia_China_Work_on_Joint_High_Precision_Satellite_Navigation_System_999.html

 

----------------------------

 

Russia-China Joint Space Studies Center May Be Created in Southeastern Russia

 

Quote

A joint-working space center of Russian and Chinese specialists could be built in Russia's southeastern Zabaikalsky Territory, the press service of the region's head said Monday in a statement.

 

A center for joint work of Russian and Chinese specialists in the sphere of space studies could be built in Russia's southeastern Zabaikalsky Territory as a part of the comprehensive plan of the region's social and economic development, the press service of the region's head said Monday in a statement.

 

"An idea, mentioned in the region's development plan, on the establishment of the regional aerospace industry center to provide support to the Vostochny cosmodrome was supported.

 

Moreover, the idea to create a center of Russian-Chinese cooperation in the field of space research was raised," the press service said.

 

The plan envisaging the region's development until 2030 is set to be approved by the Russian government by May. According to the press service, the region's Deputy Prime Minister Sergey Novichenko, who is also the regional economic development minister, has already discussed the draft plan with representatives of the expert community.

 

The plan envisages two phases of development: already existing projects are expected to be implemented in 2017-2021, laying the base for further development, then the new economy of the Zabaikalsky Territory will be formed by 2030.

 

The local authorities said that the experts discussed the possibility of aerospace industry development in the region, as well as development of small and medium-size businesses, increasing the capacities of the Zabaikalsky railway.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_China_Joint_Space_Studies_Center_May_Be_Created_in_Southeastern_Russia_999.html

 

-------------------------------

 

China Establishes Technological Cooperation with 158 Countries, Regions

 

Quote

China has established cooperation ties in science and technology with 158 countries and regions in the world, according to the Ministry of Science and Technology Friday.

 

The ministry said that a total of 111 intergovernmental agreements on science and technology cooperation had been signed, and the nation had taken part in more than 200 intergovernmental organizations devoted to boosting such cooperation.

 

A stable intergovernmental cooperation mechanism, which covers major countries, regions and international organizations, has taken shape, contributing to the improvement of the nation's capability in science and technology cooperation, according to the ministry.

 

Statistics from the ministry also showed that some 70 offices of science and technology had been set up in Chinese embassies, consulates and diplomatic missions in 47 countries, regions, international organizations and multilateral mechanisms, with 146 diplomats. (Xinhua)

http://english.cas.cn/newsroom/china_research/201701/t20170116_173413.shtml

 

-----------------------------

 

China releases four outer space probe plans

 

Quote

Beijing, China - Dec 27, 2016 

 

China has published four outer space probe plans for the near future on Tuesday, and made public a plan for developing heavy lift carrier rockets, said Wu Yanhua, deputy director of China National Space Administration.

 

He made the statement at a press conference on Tuesday on the occasion of the release of a white paper on China space activities in 2016 and major tasks for the next five years, titled "China's Space Activities in 2016." 

 

"Our future deep space probe projects consist of four major tasks. First, we will launch our first Mars probe around 2020. Based on that, we will plan for a second probe mission on Mars, bringing back samples from Mars, and carrying out scientific analysis and researches on the structure, material content, the environment on Mars. And, for the other two tasks, we will carry out an asteroid exploration and an exploration to Jupiter and another planet," said Wu. 

 

The deputy director said China is working on the research and development of the next generation of heavy-lift carrier rocket, which is planned to be named as "Changzheng-9" or "Long March-9." Work on tackling problems in key areas is underway. 

 

"There is an old saying in aerospace industry, 'If you want to develop space industry, you need to work on space rockets first; and if you want to develop space rockets, you need to work on its engines first'. So now we need to make progress in the heavy-lift carrier rocket's engine first, to create conditions for the whole project. It is planned that the heavy-lift carrier rocket's maiden flight will be heldt around 2030," he said. 

 

In addition, China will begin the construction of an information network system which covers the globe, and will make communication transmission possible in any place across the world.

emphasis mine....

link...

http://www.cctvplus.com/news/20161227/8039556.shtml#!language=1

 

China’s Space Activities in 2016

The State Council Information Office of the People’s Republic of China

(white paper...detailed)

http://www.cnsa.gov.cn/n6443408/n6465652/n6465653/c6768527/content.html

 

Space Exploration Plans Unveiled

 

Quote

The Chinese Academy of Sciences' National Space Science Center has officially unveiled five space exploration plans to be accomplished during the 13th Five Year Plan period (2016-20).

 

These include an Einstein Probe satellite that will carry two X-ray telescopes of differing sensitivities to search for black holes, gravitational waves, gamma-ray bursts and other phenomena;

 

an Advanced Space-based Solar Observatory to study the relationships between solar magnetic fields, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections;

 

a Water Cycle Observation Mission to improve scientists' understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of the water cycle and related physical processes, as well as how the water cycle responds to global changes;

 

the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling Small Satellite Constellation Exploration Plan, comprised of four small satellites in different orbits that will traverse the polar regions at the same time but at different altitudes, in order to study the outflow of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere;

 

and the Solar Wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer, a joint project between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and European Space Agency to study the interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, while simultaneously monitoring the magnetosphere's plasma environment.

 

The National Space Science Center also began soliciting research ideas from all space science-related institutes across China on Thursday. Researchers have until the end of December to make a submission.

 

After the first round of expert review, the ideas with the best prospects will receive grants from the center for up to six months of in-depth study to draw up detailed research plans. Some of these could then be chosen as candidates for the country's 14th Five Year Plan (2021-25) or 15 Five Year Plan (2026-30) on space exploration.

http://english.nssc.cas.cn/ns/headline/201612/t20161205_171613.html

 

-----------------------------------

 

China to attempt Moon sample return mission in November

 

Quote

China has announced that its Chang'e-5 automated Moon surface sampling and return mission will launch in late November 2017.

 

The 8.2-tonne probe will launch on a Long March 5 rocket from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Centre on Hainan island, and attempt the first lunar sample return since the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission in 1976.

 

The mission will be complex, with some of the key technologies and techniques involved will also be applicable for a Chinese Mars sample return mission, planned for around 2030, as well as future crewed journeys to the lunar surface.

 

"The lunar probe is comprised of four parts: an orbiter, a return module, an ascender and a lander," state media Xinhua quoted Ye Peijian, one of China's leading aerospace experts, as saying.

 

Having soft-landed on the Moon and drilled for and collected samples, an ascent module will perform an automated docking with an orbiter in a lunar orbit 380,000 km away from Earth.

http://gbtimes.com/china/china-attempt-moon-sample-return-mission-november

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Just a bit more info on the sample return mission...

 

China's Moon-Sampling Mission Targeted for November

 

chang-e-5-moon.jpg?interpolation=lanczos

Artist's concept of China's Chang'e 5 lunar sample-return mission, which the nation aims to launch in November 2017.

Credit: CNSA

 

Quote

China is working to launch a sample-return mission to the moon before the end of 2017.

 

The mission, known as Chang'e 5, will be the first to bring lunar material to Earth since the Soviet Union's Luna 24 spacecraft did so in 1976.

 

Liftoff of Chang'e 5 is scheduled to occur at the end of November, according to China's state-run Xinhua news agency. The robotic craft will ride atop China's Long March-5 booster, departing from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in southern China's Hainan Province. 

 

Four-part probe

According to Chinese news services, the over-8-ton Chang'e 5 is comprised of four parts: an orbiter, a lander, an ascender and a "returner" (an Earth re-entry module).

 

The mission will be China's first automated moon surface sampling probe. After touching down, the lander will place lunar samples into a vessel in the ascender. Then the ascender will take off from the lunar surface to dock with the orbiter and the returner, which will be circling the moon together, and transfer the samples to the returner.

 

The orbiter and returner will then head back to Earth. The two craft will separate from each other far from Earth, with the returner module eventually re-entering and parachuting down to the planet's surface solo.

 

Quote

A history of lunar sample-return

If successful, the Chang'e 5 mission would be the first lunar sample return to Earth in more than 40 years.

 

The former Soviet Union successfully executed three robotic sample-return missions in the 1970s: Luna 16 returned a small sample (101 grams, or 3.6 oz.) from Mare Fecunditatis in September of 1970; in February 1972, Luna 20 returned 55 grams (1.9 oz.) of soil from the Apollonius highlands region; and Luna 24 retrieved 170.1 grams (6 oz.) of lunar samples from the moon's Mare Crisium (Sea of Crisis) for return to Earth in August 1976.

 

And NASA's Apollo astronauts brought more than 800 lbs. (360 kilograms) of lunar material to Earth over the course of six landed moon missions from 1969 to 1972.

 

Relay station

China plans to fulfill three strategic steps with the launch of Chang'e 5: "orbiting, landing and returning."

 

The first spacecraft of China's ambitious moon program, the Chang'e 1 lunar orbiter, was launched in 2007, and Chang'e 2 followed in 2010. Chang'e 3, which included a lander and a rover, was launched in December 2013 and successfully landed softly on the moon.

 

Also on the country's moon exploration schedule is the launch of the Chang'e 4 lunar probe around 2018.

 

Chang'e 4 is designed to make the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon. (The mission was originally scheduled to launch in 2015 but was delayed, in case you were wondering why it's lifting off after Chang'e 5.) China also plans to launch a robotic probe to a gravitationally stable location beyond the lunar far side known as the Earth-moon Lagrange Point 2, to relay communications from Chang'e 4 back to Earth, according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA).

 

"The country plans to send robots to explore both lunar poles," CNSA vice director Wu Yanhua said late last year, adding that plans to send astronauts to the moon were also being discussed, Xinhua reported.

http://www.space.com/35472-china-moon-sample-return-mission-november.html?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Twitter&utm_campaign=socialtwitterspc&cmpid=social_spc_514648

 

China schedules Chang'e-5 lunar probe launch

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/China_schedules_Change_5_lunar_probe_launch_999.html

 

These are a few years old but portray the general idea....

 

China plans to land Chang'e-4 probe on dark side of the moon in 2018

video is 1:27 min.

 

 

 

 

Chang'e 5 lunar landing

video is 0:42 min.

 

 

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

China unveils top names for Mars spacecraft

 

Quote

BEIJING, Jan. 29 (Xinhua) -- China has released a short list of eight names for the country's first Mars spacecraft, which is scheduled to launch by 2020.

 

The eight names-- "Fenghuang" (phoenix), "Tianwen" (questions for heaven), "Huoxing" (Mars), "Tenglong" (soaring dragon), "Qilin" (Kylin), "Zhuque" (rose finch), "Zhuimeng" (chasing dreams) and "Fengxiang" (flying phoenix), were the top names chosen from over 14,500 choices submitted through more than 35,900 proposals entered by people worldwide.

 

China plans to launch its first Mars spacecraft by 2020, which will orbit, land and explore the Red Planet.

 

Proposals were accepted from August last year.

 

The eight names were selected via a jury review and online polls.

 

The final choice will be announced around Space Day, April 24, according to a moon probe and space program center under the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence, which solicited the proposals.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-01/29/c_136019570.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

China looks to Mars, Jupiter exploration

 

Quote

BEIJING, Jan. 30 (Xinhua) -- China's plans for deep-space exploration included two Mars missions and one Jupiter probe.

 

China plans its first Mars probe by 2020, said Wu Yanhua, vice director of the China National Space Administration.

 

A second Mars probe will bring back samples and conduct research on the planet's structure, composition and environment, Wu said.

 

Also on the agenda are an asteroid exploration, and a fly-by of the Jupiter system.

 

China aims to become a space power around 2030 with an advanced and open aerospace industry and space infrastructure.

 

Key aerospace projects currently planned by around 2020 include manned space programs, lunar probes, the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Gaofen (High Resolution) observation satellite program, according to a white paper on space activities released late last year.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-01/30/c_136020957.htm

 

-----------------------

 

Spring Festival space update: Satellite tracking, Chang'e mission updates and deep space rehash

 

satellite-tracking-kashgar-xian-scc-spring-festival-2017-cctv.jpg

The Kashgar satellite monitoring station on January 29, 2017. (Photo: CCTV/framegrab)

 

Quote

While China is currently celebrating its week-long Lunar New Year festival, teams at tracking stations are still at work, monitoring the country's various constellations of satellites. At the same time there is, somewhat fittingly, Chinese activity around the Moon.

 

While families were reuniting following over a billion journeys as part of the world's largest human migration, Chinese satellites continued to orbit above, travelling at a speed of several kilometres per second.

 

The Kashgar station is the first for establishing sky-ground contact when Chinese spacecraft enter space above China, and part of the Xi'an Satellite Control Centre and China Satellite Telemetry, Tracking and Control Network.

 

Yang Shengzhong, an engineer at the Kashgar Satellite Control Station, told state media that he and his his colleagues are tracking and controlling more than 100 satellites made and sent to orbit the Earth by China.

 

China had 181 operational satellites in orbit as of the end of June 2016, ranging from a few hundred kilometres in altitude in low Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbits 35,786 kilometres above the Earth.

 

The United States, far in the lead, had 586 operational satellites, with Russia trailing with 140.

Those in lower Earth orbits being tracked at Kashgar include Gaofen high-resolution Earth observation satellites, Fengyun weather probes, Beidou navigation and positioning satellites and the QUESS Quantum science satellite and DAMPE dark matter-hunting missions.


Chang'e moon mission updates

 

Further out, the service module of the Chang'e 5-T1 test mission launched in 2014 is still active and in orbit around the Moon, according to ChinaSpaceFlight twitter account, with closely tracks Chinese space activities.

 

The Chang'e 5-T1 mission was primarily designed to test re-entry of a capsule travelling at around 11 km per second from the Moon to Earth in preparation for China's Chang'e-5 lunar sample return mission, due to launch in November.

 

While 330kg 'little flyer' capsule successfully performed a 'skip' re-entry into Earth's atmosphere, the service module continued with other interesting objectives, including entering a halo orbit at the gravitationally balanced second Earth-Moon Lagrange point, giving the first indication that China could be considering a mission to the lunar far side, which was later confirmed with the 2018 Chang'e-4 mission.

 

ce5t023_0.jpg

Above: The far side of the Moon and distant Earth, imaged by Chang'e-5T1 service module in 2014 (Chinese Academy of Sciences).

 

Quote

The service module was also used to image the Moon to help to select a near side landing site for the Chang'e-5 sample return mission. Images of the selected site have been released, but no coordinates. One potential site is understood to be Oceanus Procellarum ("Ocean of Storms") on the western edge of the near side of the Moon.

http://gbtimes.com/china/spring-festival-space-update-satellite-tracking-change-mission-updates-and-deep-space-rehash

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision

Good on them and I wish them well ... but ... to be honest China is still figuring things out. Very ambitious. I'm going to take a "wait and see" approach, and hope that safety is their primary rule without cutting corners.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

The last couple of years has shown that China is more than willing to work with others. A few articles, above in this thread demonstrate this and they are moving in earnest. North American MSM does nobody a favor by the way Russia and China are portrayed, but that is my opinion...others have opposite views.

 

Lets put this into context. China is/have...

 

The second largest number of satellites in orbit.

 

The second largest lifter in the world today.

 

In the top 3, in number of launches, for several years, for 2017, China may be #1

 

Only Russia and China launch astronauts to LEO.

 

China has 18 active launchers and numerous small payload launchers, some with quick launch capabilities.

 

China has one space station on it's way down, a new one already up and an international one being built now.

 

China has been one of the few exploring the moon and still are.

 

China will be a part of a moon village.

 

China is preparing for a Mars sample return mission as well as gas giant probes. 

 

and this list is cut short, or I'll be here for awhile....

 

---------

 

The gist of the above article mentioned that China, within talks at the UN, have portrayed themselves to be a competitive resource such as ISRO, who do presently get "lift" contracts and China would like to be a part of that. Competition...Who wins....the customer.

 

All Space agencies are in learning mode, constantly. China is as well, and they are a space superpower now and will continue to grow with their long range plans. I look forward to their success and international involvement in scientific endeavors, as many of us here do.

 

:)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision

I wish them well.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

Just my opinion, but to me, it's all about the science and exploration.

 

I may appear to be blunt at times but this is due to not allowing politics or religion, even regional conflicts, to influence science.

 

If one puts out a concerted effort to science and exploration, I'll be the first to give kudo's, to any country with a science effort.

 

This is the reason that I have an interest in everyone's work, and am glad most here also enjoy  science.

 

Frankly I'm surprised anyone reads this thread, but once in a while, I hope that someone will read a post and say..."that is actually interesting"

 

:)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision

No bud, it's interesting and I enjoy reading it. :yes: Anything having to do with space and I'm there. I would like to see China able to participate in the ISS and get "more international", but they're awfully paranoid and I just don't see it happening ... and maybe they're worried about NK getting their hands on the gear (which I can see their point on that) and that's why their policies are the way they are. 

 

Your threads are always chock full of good stuff. Please continue!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

----------------------------

 

 

Quote

February 8, Deputy Minister of Land and satellite Cao emphasized effectively speed up the application of satellite remote sensing system construction, better services, and promote the "three deep-soil" scientific and technological innovation strategy. By 2020, the field of land and resources transmit 21 operational satellites, six research satellites.

 

 

------------------------------

 

Long March 5 development team: ten years into the front end of the casting arrow boost aerospace dream

 

1577983.jpg

China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation on the 5th team development team, the average age of less than 33 years, which lasted for ten years, the Chinese rocket among the world-class. The successful maiden flight of the Long March V rocket marks the realization of upgrading and carrying capacity of China's carrier rockets into the international advanced ranks, which is a key step for aerospace power to become a powerful space power.

 

Good article on the Long March 5 development...

http://zhuanti.spacechina.com/n1577188/c1577496/content.html

 

-----------------------------------

 

Chang'e V: will be the end of November 2017 from Wenchang from the Long March V launch vehicle launch.

 

Quote

time: 2017-02-10Category: Chang E V


January 23, 2017, lunar exploration project in the Office of the Office of Space City Exhibition Center held a lunar exploration phase III of the Chang'e V detector development report. From the test coverage, mechanical testing, special validation test, engine test, sample transfer process, the separation of surface fire products, software / FPGA evaluation, review review, on-site security and other content were discussed.

 

In January 15, 2017, the national defense science and technology bureau in Beijing organization lunar exploration project three and the Long March 5 launch vehicle engineering task headquarters fifth meeting. A comprehensive summary of the Long March V rocket project development and first flight task, to listen to the Long March V rocket second mission and the lunar exploration phase three Chang'e five tasks of the system 2017 work plan report, validation task two development overall arrangement.

 

       Tian Yulong: China's lunar exploration is not the end of the future may also be on the moon's north and south poles to detect, and consider the construction of the lunar expedition, etc., in order to achieve manned lunar landing technical reserves. He stressed that Mars exploration and lunar exploration, will be China's space power symbol and drive engineering.

https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/satellite/Deepspace/CE-5/CE5-launch.html

 

-------------------------

 

Beijing Blue Arrow signed the first single domestic private space: the first quarter of 2018 is expected to launch

 

1484325630121039.jpg

 

Quote

Beijing Blue Arrow signed the first single domestic private space

Blue Arrow Space Science and Technology

 

Private enterprises in the field of commercial space development made new breakthroughs. January 13, 2017, Beijing Blue Arrow Space Technology Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as "Beijing Blue Arrow") and Denmark Gomspace company in Hangzhou, rocket launch service agreement, it is understood that this is the domestic private commercial aerospace enterprises to undertake the first Orders for commercial rocket launch services in international markets.

 

Beijing Blue Arrow CEO Zhang Changwu said in an interview, the company through more than a year of technology development and market development, has been in the blue arrow series launch vehicle development has made rapid progress for technology and a series of launch services, A high degree of recognition of the contracting parties. The signing of the agreement, which marks the Chinese private rocket launch companies to participate in international competition in the market has taken a substantial step forward.

 

Quote

Private commercial space is the first step

 

It is understood that the Beijing Blue Arrow as the first to enter the development of private enterprises launch vehicle, the company is committed to becoming a first-class carrier rocket enterprises, is also currently serving the international launch service market, the first private commercial launch vehicle provider . The company has developed the overall system development capabilities of the rocket, including the rocket body structure, control system, separation system and the design of the system stand-alone equipment core capabilities. At the same time, through the upstream and downstream industry chain, with the final assembly of the rocket, the total test conditions and ability to research and development.

 

GomSpace is a Danish aerospace company with a strong market network, partners in Europe and the world, has repeatedly for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide micro-satellite systems and related services. It has developed micro and nano satellites, cubic star development and production capacity, the development of micro-nano-satellite-related innovative products and system mission concept for the new micro-satellite systems to provide technical validation for small satellite and micro-satellite subsystem R & D Overall solution.

 

According to the agreement , Beijing Blue Arrow will use the LandSpace-1 launch vehicle in 2018 to launch GomSpace's cube satellite cluster.

 "Prior to this, the domestic private commercial aerospace companies do not have any commercial rocket launch case, so the foreign concern is the blue arrow technology and products, especially rockets can adapt to the satellite load demand, including orbital inclination, stability Sexual and a series of core issues, and ultimately to ensure that the actual performance of the ability to wait for all aspects of the details. "Zhang Changwu said.

The two sides from the initial contact to the site inspection, technical feasibility studies to the final contract, the entire negotiations lasted 9 months. In the negotiation process, the foreign company has sent three batches of business and technical experts, including the team, from all aspects of the Beijing Blue Arrow of the technical programs and comprehensive strength assessment, and ultimately determine the launch of cooperation with Beijing.

https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/rocket/Landspace/GomSpace.html

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's a glimpse of China's new Tianzhou-1 cargo spacecraft

 

Quote

A state media video report offers rare footage of China's Tianzhou-1 cargo and resupply spacecraft, which will launch in April to test refuelling technology needed for the country's plan for a large space station.

 

The video shows what is China's first such spacecraft undergoing development and testing at the AIT facility in Tianjin, North China, as well as 3D renderings of Tianzhou-1 docking with the Tiangong-2 space lab.

 

The main objective of the Tianzhou-1 mission is to test and verify on-orbit transfer of liquid propellant in microgravity to Tiangong-2, which late last year hosted two astronauts for China’s longest human spaceflight mission so far.

 

The 13-tonne, 9m long and 3.35m diameter Tianzhou vessels will perform a similar role to Russia's expendable Progress cargo spacecraft, used to refuel and resupply the InternationalSpace Station.

 

Tianzhou-1 will be launched by a new Long March 7 rocket and dock soon after with the orbiting Tiangong-2 space lab 390 kilometres above the Earth.

 

Bai Mingsheng, chief designer of Tianzhou-1 at the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), explains that the refuelling of Tiangong-2 with propellant will occur following two months of being docked in orbit.

 

Both Tianzhou-1 and its carrier rocket will soon be shipped from Tianjin to the southern island province of Hainan, which hosts the Wenchang Space Launch Centre.

http://gbtimes.com/china/heres-glimpse-chinas-new-tianzhou-1-cargo-spacecraft

 

China to launch Tianzhou-1 cargo spacecraft in April

video is 1:37 min.

 

 

 

----------------------

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Draggendrop

bits and bytes...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Space: Italy-China agreement

 

Quote

Agreement between the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) for new scientific experiments on board the Chinese space station as part of human flight. The agreement was signed in Beijing by the President of ASI, Roberto Battiston, and the General Manager of CMSA, Wang Zhaoyao, on the occasion of the state visit to China by President of the Republic Sergio Mattarella. Scientific collaboration is to study the long-term missions of astronauts, in particular on aspects of biomedicine and physiology and related technologies.
 
"Space is a new Silk Road without boundaries, and international cooperation is a key element, both from a scientific point of view and from that of technological development," said Roberto Battiston. "With China have for years excellent scientific reports in different sectors - added the President of ASI - This agreement is important for the European and international scientific community in preparation for future missions of human exploration of the solar system. Only a common wealth of knowledge can make us move forward with success in space exploration. "
 
The agreement provides for the creation by the two agencies of a Joint Cooperation Committee which will meet at least once a year to establish the modalities of the partnership, among which there are provided access to scientific data, joint scientific publications, exchange of staff and joint participation in technical reviews on human flight. Potential impact of this agreement is extremely significant, considering, on the one hand, the leadership position that Italy has achieved in the field of human flight as part of the implementation and exploitation of the International Space Station and on the other, the 'important human flight program that China is developing, in particular with the construction of the space station Tiangong-3.

http://www.asi.it/it/news/spazio-accordo-italia-cina

 

-----------------------

 

 

 

India in record satellite launch as Asia's space race heats up

 

Quote

India, China and Japan have all outlined bold space exploration plans for 2017 and beyond. Smaller powers, like South Korea, also want to get in on the act with ambitions of their own.


The increasing competition for space-related power and prestige in Asia has echoes of the Cold War space race of the mid-20th century.
But they're not the only motivations. The pursuit of science and technological advancement plus the economic and commercial benefits they bring also factor highly.


"I've long said that the real race is in Asia," says Joan Johnson-Freese, a professor and space specialist at the US Naval War College.
"Recognition of the multifaceted benefits from space exploration and space technology dates back to the Apollo program. Asian countries have been following that model and seeking those benefits ever since."

 

Quote

China, India's great regional rival for superpower status and the most rapidly accelerating space power, is also gearing up for a busy few years.
It will test its Tianzhou-1 cargo and resupply spacecraft in April -- a key technology needed for country's space station that's expected to be up and running by 2022.


Later in the year, will send a probe to the moon that will collect and return with soil sample.


By the end of the decade, China says it will have also become the first country to land on the far side of the moon and also wants to land a rover on Mars.

more at the link...

http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/13/asia/india-china-asia-space-race/?platform=hootsuite

 

-------------------------

 

 

Quote

[Blue Arrow One] small solid launch vehicle, is expected in March 2018 from Wenchang launch launch.HTTPS: // goo.gl/loLMYc  - this year's first launch should also be in Wenchang. In addition the Danish people played another name Orbital-1, there may be a small satellite in Hainan.

 

 

 

 

China to launch first high-throughput communications satellite in April

 

Quote

BEIJING, Feb. 17 (Xinhua) -- China plans to launch Shijian-13, its first high-throughput communications satellite, in April, the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST) said Friday.

 

The 4.6-tonne satellite, with a message capacity of more than 20 GB, will be carried into orbit by a Long March-3B carrier rocket, according to the CAST.

 

An increase in satellite throughput will provide better access to the Internet on planes and high-speed trains, said Wang Min, deputy head of the CAST's Institute of Telecommunication Satellite.

 

For the first time, a large number of domestic components have been used on a communications satellite with an orbital life of 15 years, Wang said. It is also the first time electric propulsion has been used on a Chinese satellite.

 

Shijian-13 has been transported to the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China's Sichuan Province. After completing in-orbit technical tests, it will be designated as Zhongxing-16.

 

In 2017, China plans to launch six communications satellites, including Shijian-13 and Shijian-18.

 

Shijian-18 will be put into orbit by a Long March-5 carrier rocket in June, and will test the DFH-5 satellite platform, Wang said.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-02/17/c_136065211.htm

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Rocket Lab to launch more BlackSky satellites in new deal
      by Paul Hill



      Rocket Lab has announced that it has signed a deal with BlackSky to launch nine of the latter’s satellites across five Electron missions after the successful launch of a BlackSky satellite by Rocket Lab earlier this week. The satellites will be taken into low Earth orbit where they will help deliver real-time geospatial intelligence and global monitoring services.

      Commenting on the deal, Rocket Lab Founder and CEO Peter Beck said:

      According to the announcement, this deal is the largest number of satellites that BlackSky has committed to a single launch provider. Under the arrangement, eight of BlackSky’s 130kg satellites will be launched on four missions throughout the year and will demonstrate Rocket Lab’s responsive launch capability. The agreement also includes options for two additional launches in the fourth quarter.

      The year is shaping up to be an important one for Rocket Lab. At the start of the month, it announced a merger with Vector Acquisition Corporation which will see the firm become a publicly-traded company and appear as RKLB on the Nasdaq. This year, the company also has a launch lined up for the U.S. Space Force and it will be sending a mission to the Moon for NASA.

    • By zikalify
      OneWeb and SatixFy to bring satellite Wi-Fi to planes
      by Paul Hill



      The satellite company OneWeb, which was acquired by the UK government last July, is working with the multibeam antenna firm SatixFy to develop new In-Flight Connectivity (IFC) terminal technology that will use OneWeb’s satellite constellation to deliver broadband-comparable speeds on aeroplanes.

      According to the announcement put out by OneWeb, the new IFC terminal will work over OneWeb’s constellation as well as on Geostationary (GEO) satellite networks. To help bring IFC terminals to Commercial Aviation Markets, SatixFy has formed a joint venture with Singapore Technology Engineering Ltd that’s known as JetTalk.

      Commenting on the news, Ben Griffin, VP Mobility at OneWeb, said:

      According to the European Space Agency, which has contributed towards SatixFy’s terminal implementation, OneWeb currently operates 110 low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites but in future plans to expand this to around 650. The terminals will use electronically steered multi-beam antenna (ESMA) technology to allow them to operate at the same time between several different satellites.

      None of those involved in the project gave an estimate of when the commercial products will finally make their way into aircraft but the work to develop the technology and commercialise it is well underway.

    • By zikalify
      TWIRL 3: Rocket Lab to attempt launch of delayed mission
      by Paul Hill



      Last week was quite good for SpaceX with it almost successfully landing its Starship rocket during a test, unfortunately, it caught fire and exploded on the pad. Rocket Lab also had to delay its “They Go Up So Fast” mission which we covered in This Week in Rocket Launches #2 but will make another go of it this week.



      Aside from Rocket Lab’s mission to put several satellites into orbit, there will be two SpaceX launches carrying more satellites for the Starlink constellation as well as a Chinese mission carrying an experimental satellite called Xin Jishu Yanzheng 6 which replaces a satellite that was lost last year.

      Rocket Lab’s launch will be performed by one of its Electron rockets, it will carry the Blacksky Global satellite and several CubeSats named Centauri 3, Gunsmoke-J, M2 (A/B), Myriota 7, and Veery Hatchling. Electron rockets are very light, weighing in at just 12,500 kg; this is probably where the inspiration for the name of the mission came from. The launch will be live-streamed on the company’s website on or around Wednesday if the launch goes ahead.



      On Wednesday and Saturday, SpaceX will launch Falcon 9 rockets, both carrying 60 Starlink satellites. Internally, the missions are known as Starlink V1.0-L20 and Starlink V1.0-L21 respectively and the total payload mass weighs in at 15.6 tonnes with each satellite weighing 260 kg. There are 1141 Starlink satellites in orbit but the firm plans to orbit nearer 10,000 satellites eventually before ramping the number up above 30,000 so we’ll see these launches for a long time. To watch these launches, check out SpaceX’s YouTube channel which will carry recordings if you miss the live events.

      Before SpaceX’s second launch, China will send up its Long March CZ-7A carrying the Xin Jishu Yanzheng 6 satellite. The satellite is experimental and a part of a series of demonstration missions being carried out by the Chinese National Space Administration (CNSA). As is typical with Chinese launches, video and photos of the launch will appear online following the launch but there likely will be no live stream.

      There are plenty more rocket launches every week for the remainder of the month so be sure to look out for next week’s This Week in Rocket Launches (TWIRL).

    • By zikalify
      Rocket Lab releases plans for reusable Neutron rocket
      by Paul Hill



      Rocket Lab, one of the many private space firms, has revealed plans for a new reusable rocket called Neutron. The firm said that the 8-ton payload launch vehicle will deploy satellite constellations, go to other planets and take humans into space.

      If you’ve been following Neowin’s new This Week in Rocket Launches (TWIRL) series, you’ll know that Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket already delivers satellites into space. While Electron is limited to launching 300 kg satellites, the new rocket will be able to lift 8,000 kg to low-Earth orbit, 2,000 kg to the Moon, and 1,500 kg to Mars and Venus.

      Speaking about the announcement, Rocket Lab founder and CEO Peter Beck said:

      Much like SpaceX has been doing with its rockets, Neutron’s first of two stages will be designed to land on an ocean platform, this will allow the company to lower costs for customers and get more launches done. Rocket Lab expects to perform Neutron launches from Virginia’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Launching from this facility will eliminate the need for Rocket Lab to build a new pad which will accelerate the time to launch.

      The firm said it expects to begin launches of Neutron rockets from 2024 and is looking for sites across America to build a new factory that will support the manufacture of the Neutron rocket and create hundreds of jobs.

    • By zikalify
      TWIRL 2: SpaceX's Starship SN10 could take flight
      by Paul Hill



      Things are a little quieter this week on the space launch front compared with last week. This week we can expect to see Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket launch a Blacksky Global satellite among others, Iran’s Pars 1 satellite is set to make another launch attempt, and SpaceX is expected to launch the successor to Starship SN9 which exploded several weeks ago.

      The first launch of the week is due on Monday from New Zealand where Rocket Lab will launch an Electron rocket carrying Blacksky Global satellite and several CubeSats dubbed Centauri 3, Gunsmoke-J, M2 (A/B), Myriota 7, and Veery Hatchling. The firm has decided to call the mission “They Go Up So Fast” - something which is actually true thanks to the rocket weighing just 12,500 kg. On the day of launch, Rocket Lab will publish a live stream on its website.

      Next up, again on Monday, is Iran’s Simorgh rocket which will deliver the Pars 1 satellite into orbit. The mission was originally scheduled for last Thursday but it appears to have been pushed back. The rocket will launch from the Imam Khomeini Space Launch Center in Semnan. The satellite is equipped with remote-sensing technologies which will monitor the country’s agricultural lands, forests and lakes, and monitor any damage from fires and floods that may happen in the future.

      Finally, we’ve got SpaceX’s Starship SN10 which is due for a test launch, possibly in the coming days. This is not a launch to space and is just a test so there’s no fixed schedule but it could happen as soon as tomorrow. In this test launch, we will be keenly watching to see whether the company can finally pull off the landing which it has failed to do with SN8 and SN9 which have launched since December. The NASASpaceFlight YouTube channel and SpaceX’s official YouTube channel will cover the event when it finally happens but don’t be surprised if it gets scrubbed several times.

      That’s all for the first week of March but the month ahead is packed with launches every week so be on the lookout for future This Week in Rocket Launches posts over the coming weekends.