Spotify destroys SSDs with data thrashing bug


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sinetheo

Spotify has a SQL-Lite bug which it uses to store media files and playlists that constantly re-compresses. Spotify claims to have fixed it with an update but other readers found it still trashing gigs of data to their SSDs/HDs an hour. A reader pointed out anyone with a large playlist can go over the 60 TB limit easily in just 4 days for those who have over 1,000 songs stored.

 

Arstechnica has the scoop here

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Danielx64
6 minutes ago, sinetheo said:

can go over the 60 TB limit

What do you mean?

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sinetheo
5 minutes ago, Danielx64 said:

What do you mean?

Solid State drives have endurance limits before they fail or get corrupted data writes. As the data thrashes at full force at many gigybytes an hour for those who a large collection it can write up to 40 to 60 terabytes in several days/weeks. 

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xendrome
41 minutes ago, sinetheo said:

Solid State drives have endurance limits before they fail or get corrupted data writes. As the data thrashes at full force at many gigybytes an hour for those who a large collection it can write up to 40 to 60 terabytes in several days/weeks. 

Right but there exactly did you pull/make up a 60TB limit at? It's not in the original article, and each SSD/MFG is different.

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Jim K

Very interesting.  

 

Please note at the bottom of the ArsTechnica where they updated their article with a response from Spotify.

 

Quote

We've seen some questions in our community around the amount of written data using the Spotify client on desktop. These have been reviewed and any potential concerns have now been addressed in version 1.0.42, currently rolling out to all users.

 

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Danielx64
1 minute ago, xendrome said:

Right but there exactly did you pull/make up a 60TB limit at? It's not in the original article, and each SSD/MFG is different.

Thank you for pointing that out, I was wondering that myself. Being honest I never owned an SSD so I don't have hand on experience with then.

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Farchord
1 minute ago, xendrome said:

Right but there exactly did you pull/make up a 60TB limit at? It's not in the original article, and each SSD/MFG is different.

 

I believe they were quoting their own specific test subject's limit (Their own SSD's limit)

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