How to remove/detach stand of LG LED monitor


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S. Jeferson

I need to remove the stand of my LG LED monitor. I have removed the base by unscrewing the screw, but just couldn't detach the stand. There is no screws and the stand is somehow locked with the monitor. I really need to detach them. Please somebody help me...

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Mindovermaster

What model is it?

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Circaflex

maybe here will help, 

 

Also, check underneath for a screw that a coin would fit into, it is possible you need to loosen that piece, but without the model number it is all a guessing game.

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S. Jeferson
On 11/22/2016 at 7:49 PM, Mindovermaster said:

What model is it?

Well, It's LG monitor, Model:24MP55VQ. But i believe most of the monitors of LG has stand with same mechanism regardless the model.....

Edited by S. Jeferson
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Mindovermaster
11 minutes ago, S. Jeferson said:

Well, It's LG monitor, Model:24MP55VQ. But i believe most of the monitors of LG has stand with same mechanism regardless the model.....

 

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The Evil Overlord

A quick google search reveals it is one of those mounts that either are screwed into the underside of the monitor, or non screw type fixing.

Check the back of your monitor at the bottom of it to see if there are any screws relating to the position of the stand riser.

If no screws are present, and the image I've attached, is correct to your model, try using force to pull the riser from the back of the monitor.

lg-24mp55vq.png

(My samsungs are similar, but they were bottom mounted, and required a large amount of force to remove the stands once fitted.)

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S. Jeferson
On 11/22/2016 at 9:24 PM, Circaflex said:

maybe here will help, 

 

Also, check underneath for a screw that a coin would fit into, it is possible you need to loosen that piece, but without the model number it is all a guessing game.

I got a screw at the base and unscrewed it. But did not find any between the monitor and stand.

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S. Jeferson
40 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

[VIDEO]

Actually that's not the thing i really want to do. I just want to detach the three parts (plate, stand and monitor). I have to put them in the box and carry them to another place for some reason. Thanks for your suggestion...

Edited by S. Jeferson
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S. Jeferson
26 minutes ago, The Evil Overlord said:

A quick google search reveals it is one of those mounts that either are screwed into the underside of the monitor, or non screw type fixing.

Check the back of your monitor at the bottom of it to see if there are any screws relating to the position of the stand riser.

If no screws are present, and the image I've attached, is correct to your model, try using force to pull the riser from the back of the monitor.

lg-24mp55vq.png

(My samsungs are similar, but they were bottom mounted, and required a large amount of force to remove the stands once fitted.)

I really applied enough force to pull the stand out. Might be there is something I have to try in other way...

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S. Jeferson

Yes !!!! Finally I've done this. Its really not so complicated. Got a video and it made my job done. Thanks "Mindovermaster"

for referring Youtube. It's really so easy guys, have a look...

 

 

Edited by S. Jeferson
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  • 2 months later...
S. Jeferson
On 11/24/2016 at 1:42 PM, S. Jeferson said:

Yes !!!! Finally I've done this. Its really not so complicated. Got a video and it made my job done. Thanks "Mindovermaster"

for referring Youtube. It's really so easy guys, have a look...

LG stand removal

 

 

 

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